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Lens Protection/UV Filter Coatings
Hello,.

Regarding lens protection, I see a lot of folks simply apply a simple UV filter to their lenses, and when searching BH, I notice that there are basic, multi-coated, super-multi-coated, and pro digital versions of the Hoya UV(0) filter... and naturally the price ranges are from low-$20s to mid-$70s..

My first question is: Understanding that lenses themselves are multi-coated, is there something other than a UV filter that I should be using for lens protection that will not negatively alter image quality?.

And secondly: For someone who has tried them, are there noticable/significant differences between, say a basic UV filter and a super-multi coated or pro-digital version (aside from price) - is it worth it to splurge here?.

Thanks!..

Comments (10)

The best protection is a lens hood.....period. I see UV filters as useless with today's modern lens coatings available and the only ones worth getting are circular polarizers and neutral density filters for specific effects, but get the best available if you've got expensive lenses so as not to degrade the image quality..

Http://www.gdanmitchell.com/2007/12/27/uv-filter-or-notRegards,Hank.

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Comment #1

Match the quality of the UV filter to the quality of the lens you put it on. So for a cheap consumer lens, a less expensive coated, but maybe not multicoated, UV filter will do the job. But on that expensive 'L' or 'ED' glass, get the best filter you can afford..

A better filter on the cheap glass will also do the job, but may not be cost effective..

Why use the filter (and do ALWAYS use a lens hood)? Protection of the front element, especially important on that expensive lens..

Dust, grime, fingerprints, water, oils and even salt spray (live near the ocean?) will accumulate on that filter. Easy to clean off on a periodic basis. But sometimes the grime can be abrasive and can scratch the glass during cleaning. Eventually that filter will start to show the wear and tear of what besets it and it will become increasingly difficult to clean properly. When that happens, toss the filter and replace it with a new one..

You cannot replace the front element of your lens, at least not for any price I'd bet you would be willing to pay..

The downside to filters is that they can produce some additional flare and maybe the occasional ghost. The better multicoated filters minimize these effects..

It's your lens and your money. You decide..

The greatest of mankind's criminals are those who delude themselves into thinking they have done 'the right thing.'- Rayna Butler..

Comment #2

GodSpeaks wrote:.

You cannot replace the front element of your lens, at least not forany price I'd bet you would be willing to pay..

I've never heard of them being expensive. What have you paid to get them replaced?..

Comment #3

How does a lens hood protect a lens? Flare yes thats what lens hoods are for, exposing lens coatings to soot, wet, fingerprints, dust, and those exhaust fumes in the photo you provided is a bad idea. Even if you take the UV off to shoot store and carry the lens with it on...

Comment #4

Kinnaird wrote:.

How does a lens hood protect a lens?.

Against acidental stray fingerprints, impacts/contact with any foreign object. Most telephoto hoods are fairly deep.

Flare yes thats what lens hoodsare for, exposing lens coatings to soot, wet, fingerprints, dust, andthose exhaust fumes in the photo you provided is a bad idea..

Yes, in extreme conditions where shooting in a dust/sand storm or in a raging storm a quality clear filter is a viable option.

Even if you take the UV off to shoot store and carry the lens with it on..

That's what lens caps are for.....Regards,Hank.

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Comment #5

Hank3152 wrote:.

Kinnaird wrote:.

How does a lens hood protect a lens?.

Against acidental stray fingerprints, impacts/contact with anyforeign object. Most telephoto hoods are fairly deep.

Flare yes thats what lens hoodsare for, exposing lens coatings to soot, wet, fingerprints, dust, andthose exhaust fumes in the photo you provided is a bad idea..

Yes, in extreme conditions where shooting in a dust/sand storm or ina raging storm a quality clear filter is a viable option.

Even if you take the UV off to shoot store and carry the lens with it on..

That's what lens caps are for.....Regards,Hank.

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I'd just like to add to Hanks good advice. Keep the lens cap on when you're not actively taking a photo. Always use the lens cap and hood. In dusty or wet conditions or salt air use a good filter. If you are going to use a filter get a multicoated UV filter. I don't find the Hoya HMC's satisfactory (IMO) but I would consider that to be the minimum quality required for even a consumer kit lens..

Read over these links and decide.http://www.photofilter.com/B+W/bw_filters.htmhttp://www.photofilter.com/hoya_filter_information_page.htm.

There is a difference between 97% transmission of light and 99.5%. That's the ballpark range between the HMC, and Super HMC or MRC coated filters...

Comment #6

Okay so the odds of a stray pebble breaking my glassis a million to one.Great except if i'm the one in the million.This is like the Canon vs Nikon debate.There is no right answer.Try both ways then you decide.I keep a uv filter on each one of my lens...

Comment #7

Fine, since that's your informed decision. You weighed the options and made the best choice for your circumstance and comfort level..

I hope you use a high end filter + lens cap + lens hood...

Comment #8

In my personal experience lens caps don't stop dust and I hate wiping multi coated lenses. And yes telephoto hoods are deep and wideangle hoods are not...

Comment #9

A lens hood and lens cap and a high end filter is better than a high end filter alone. Also, a high end filter is better than a low end or midrange filter. Name your poison...

Comment #10

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