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Lens / focal length Confusion
I am about to take the plunge from my Fuji S5600 to a DSLR... Can't really decide yet but the specification that is confusing me is the lens, focal length etc....

Most DSLRs have a standard lens kit and I am sure that they are mostly pretty good but DSLRs don't quote an optical zoom figure - I guess this is because if you have to ask etc....

Can someone please explain how it works? My Fuji has what I believe to be an 18-55mm lens or 6.3-63mm focal length (38-380mm equiv) and a 10x optical zoom... I like the 10x zoom and I want to make sure that I get an lens with my DSLR (D40, EOS350 etc) that can achieve the same..Am I missing the point?.

Http://www.flickr.com/photos/tim_norris/..

Comments (44)

You would likely need a 28-300mm lens for an APS-C sized DSLR to achieve a similar range in a one lens solution. Whether you're happy with the optical quality you'll achieve in that scenario is a different question and one you'll need to investigate..

If you're thinking of Canon, their 28-300 is big and expensive but generally of a higher quality than third party lenses. But Sigma and Tamron also offer alternatives with Tamron's being quite compact and includes stabilization. I'm not familiar enough with the Nikon zoom offerings to know if they have one in that range..

I think you'll hear from most people that if you want a one lens only kit on a DSLR then you kind of are missing the point as it starts to sound as if you'll just be using it as a glorified point and shoot. However I think it's at least a starting point and will provide some other useful benefits over a p&s that will still make it fun and worthwhile. Maybe you'll grow into it more and want to expand...

Comment #1

Thanks but I think you are missing the point in my badly worded question....

My camera says 18-55mm lens or 6.3-63mm focal length (38-380mm equivalent)....

A lens kit that come with a DSLR normally says 18-55 - will this give me the same sort of macro - telephoto range that my S5600 has?.

Will it give me an equivalent 10x optical zoom? Does this really matter?.

Http://www.flickr.com/photos/tim_norris/..

Comment #2

ThatBoyTim wrote:.

I am about to take the plunge from my Fuji S5600 to a DSLR... Can'treally decide yet but the specification that is confusing me is thelens, focal length etc....

Most DSLRs have a standard lens kit and I am sure that they aremostly pretty good but DSLRs don't quote an optical zoom figure - Iguess this is because if you have to ask etc....

Can someone please explain how it works? My Fuji has what I believeto be an 18-55mm lens or 6.3-63mm focal length (38-380mm equiv) and a10x optical zoom... I like the 10x zoom and I want to make sure thatI get an lens with my DSLR (D40, EOS350 etc) that can achieve thesame..Am I missing the point?.

The confusion is that "10X" doesn't really tell you as much as "28-280mm." 10X could be 20-200, 30-300, 40-400, etc. You should also note that few DSLR lenses offer that range, the ones that do offer mediocre image quality. Canon's 28-300 doesn't offer wide angle unless you use film or a $$$$ full-frame body. You want something like 18mm on the wide end. The best of the bunch is Nikon's 18-200. If you really want a 10X (actually 11X) lens, you should go for a Nikon and that lens. It's about $650...

Comment #3

Someone tell me "Why do I want a DSLR" again?..

Comment #4

Where are you getting those specs from? (the 18-55mm)..

Comment #5

I too cannot understand where the 18-55 comes from in reltion to your old camera..

Anyway you want a digital SLR because you either want to get very serious about picture taking, and thus want a camera with lots of accessories including sophisticated lighting, plus the ability (using other lenses than the one that comes with the caemra) to shoot under a wider variety of conditions, including lower light..

Or....

You're going nuts because of the delay between when you press the button and when the camera goes off, with your current camera. D-SLR cameras go off almost instantaneously..

As for leneses ....

SEveral manufacturers make an 18-200 mm lens, and this is a 10X lens, from wide angle to telephoto, and reasonably priced..

BAK..

Comment #6

Don't know come to think of it but the lens says 55mm on the front...I think I assumed the 18 bit 'cos I read it everywhere else!!!.

So I should be looking at 6.3-63mm ? .

Image control:Zoom outZoom 100%Zoom inExpand AllOpen in new window..

Comment #7

Ahhh ... the filter threads are 55mm diameter. There's no 18mm. (It's not as confusing as you make it out to be, if you don't make up numbers that aren't there .

So if the camera has 38-380mm equivalent, you can pretty well match that with a Tamron 18-250mm lens. On a 1.5X crop camera (Sony, Nikon, Pentax) that gives you 27-375mm equivalent while on a 1.6X crop camera (Canon) it gives you 29-400mm equivalent. A nice alternative giving you as much telephoto reach, but noticably better wide angle coverage than the lens on the Fuji camera..

- DennisGallery at http://kingofthebeasts.smugmug.com..

Comment #8

ThatBoyTim wrote:.

Someone tell me "Why do I want a DSLR" again?.

Why don't you tell us why you think you might? And, what you plan to use it for...

Comment #9

ThatBoyTim wrote:.

Most DSLRs have a standard lens kit and I am sure that they aremostly pretty good but DSLRs don't quote an optical zoom figure - Iguess this is because if you have to ask etc....

The zoom figure quoted on digicams is purely the relationship between the wide angle focal length and the full zoom focal length. In the camera you have at present it's 6.3mm to 63mm which is a factor of 10 - i.e. 10x zoom - the telephoto end is 10 times the focal length of the wide angle focal length. DSLRs don't quote this as it is a feature of the lens and the camera itself doesn't have a focal length until you attach a lens..

6.3-63mm focal length (38-380mm equiv).

The bench mark measure for focal length comparisons is the 35mm equivalent length - i.e. what focal length/field of view that would be equal to with a 35mm film camera. In your Fuji's case, that's 38mm to 380mm. Slightly wider angle than 'standard' (50mm on a 35mm), to a decent level of telephoto zoom..

Most digicams and lower end DSLRs have a smaller physical sensor than the 25 x 35mm rectangle of a film plane, so the factor of difference in this size is called the crop factor - and you multiply the focal length of the lens by this factor to get the 35mm equivalent focal length. Your digicam must therefore have a x6 crop factor (i.e. it has a tiny little sensor, much smaller than a 35mm film frame) which many compacts do..

DSLRs have bigger sensors and most are in the x1.4 to x2 crop factor range, my Canon 20D is x1.6. So if I buy a lens that's 50mm, it's equivalent to 80mm on a 35mm camera - 1.6 x 50. The higher end DSLRs are often called full frame as the sensors are the same size as a 35mm film frame, so there is no crop factor..

I like the 10x zoom and I want to make sure thatI get an lens with my DSLR (D40, EOS350 etc) that can achieve thesame...

It's not just the '10x' that you need to consider - that's just a factor of multiplication between the widest and longest ends - but the focal lengths and the field of view they offer you. 38 - 380mm equivalent would be something like 25 - 250mm on most DSLRs - so lenses like the Tamron and Sigma 18-250mms would provide a similar visual range of views. I use a Sigma 18-200mm as a general purpose lens - but supplement this with other special purpose lenses for particular tasks. Most kit lenses that come with cameras, if you buy a kit rather than a body and specific lens of choice, are of a rather shorter range of focal lengths, like the 18-55 you cite, which is a 3x zoom with something like a 29 - 88mm 35mm equivalent focal range..

It will all rather depend on your budget v. what you like to shoot as to what lens would be best for you..

So many photos, so little time.http://www.peekaboo.me.uk - general portfolio & tutorialshttp://www.boo-photos.co.uk - live music portfoliohttp://imageevent.com/boophotos/ - most recent images.

Please do not amend and re-post my images unless specifically requested or given permission to do so...

Comment #10

If you have to ask, you probably aren't ready for it yet. No harm in sticking with what you've got until you've wrung everything out of it that you can..

DSLR's are a whole new can of worms from a point and shoot. Much of what point and shoots do for you, you now have to do for yourself with a DSLR - you won't buy a DSLR and take great pictures - you have to learn the system and learn post processing and learn about exposure..

ThatBoyTim wrote:.

Someone tell me "Why do I want a DSLR" again?.

Some cool cats that can use your helphttp://www.wildlife-sanctuary.org.

Even if you can't donate, please help spread the word...

Comment #11

ThatBoyTim wrote:.

I am about to take the plunge from my Fuji S5600 to a DSLR... Can'treally decide yet but the specification that is confusing me is thelens, focal length etc....

Most DSLRs have a standard lens kit and I am sure that they aremostly pretty good but DSLRs don't quote an optical zoom figure - Iguess this is because if you have to ask etc....

Can someone please explain how it works? My Fuji has what I believeto be an 18-55mm lens or 6.3-63mm focal length (38-380mm equiv) and a10x optical zoom... I like the 10x zoom and I want to make sure thatI get an lens with my DSLR (D40, EOS350 etc) that can achieve thesame..Am I missing the point?.

Most dslr users cover that range with 2 lenses and not one. If you're set on one lens then the Nikon 18-200mm would come close or the Tamron that was mentioned. If you don't mind two lenses you could get a bigger range and better image quality from a Nikon 18-70 or 180-135 and 70-300VR..

You might be missing the point a little. A dslr gives you the opportunity to use special purpose lenses but I am sure there are many people who use a dslr and stick with one all-purpose lens..

Http://www.flickr.com/photos/tim_norris/..

Comment #12

ThatBoyTim wrote:.

Someone tell me "Why do I want a DSLR" again?.

Why do you want a camera, if zoom ratio is that important to you? You can get a video cam which will easily get 20-30-40-etc zoom... And it might take still photos, too...

Comment #13

IMac - my question was what we call rhetorical (I expect that is spelt wrong.)....

Also my zoom on my Fuji is great fun - and it seems that you have to pay a lot to have that fun with a DSLR!.

I am ready for the step to DSLR and I know about post processing and those other things you mention - my only question was wtf do all the lens/focal length figures mean and how do I get the same zoom equivalent in a DSLR.....

Comment #14

Good answer Dennis. I have done some research and I know have to decide where to spend my money....

Canon v Nikon....

I have another question which I will research first and that is about the lack of Autofocus on the entry level DSLRs.....

Comment #15

I guess the trade off is as follows:.

My Fuji is a bit of a jack of all trades and a sort of convergence of the best bits from DSLRs. So called bridging cameras and P&S pocket cams have got clever and still remain quite cheap, I have gotten used to that....

And I think I have gotten pretty good at taking photos :http://www.flickr.com/photos/tim_norris/.

Now I want to get more serious and improve the quality of my photos, and when you get more serious there isn't really such a thing as a jack of all trades....

The two (jack of all and serious photography) don't really go hand in hand...

Thanks for you help... Now I need to take the plunge Canon/Nikon, 6mp/8mp/10mp, 400/600/800....

Argh!!!!..

Comment #16

I want to firstly improve the quality of my photos..I want to shoot faster - people, family, life, street...

I want to shoot outdors and landscapes.. Wiltshire is a beautiful place and I want to capture it better...

Take a look at my photo stream on Flickr (ignore some of the recent photoshop fun!) and hopefully you will get an idea of what I like to do and agree with me that I am ready to move on to DSLR....

Http://www.flickr.com/photos/tim_norris/.

Image control:Zoom outZoom 100%Zoom inExpand AllOpen in new window.

Image control:Zoom outZoom 100%Zoom inExpand AllOpen in new window.

Image control:Zoom outZoom 100%Zoom inExpand AllOpen in new window.

Image control:Zoom outZoom 100%Zoom inExpand AllOpen in new window.

Image control:Zoom outZoom 100%Zoom inExpand AllOpen in new window.

Thanks, Tim..

Comment #17

ThatBoyTim wrote:.

I have another question which I will research first and that isabout the lack of Autofocus on the entry level DSLRs....

What on earth makes you think *any* DSLRs don't have autofocus? I'm personally not aware that any on the market lack this fundamental feature..

Some older lenses, when paired with a modern electronic DSLR may not offer AF, as might be the case with some combinations of TCs or extension tubes and lenses, but the vast majority of lenses and bodies will give you AF and MF - usually physically switched between on the lens itself..

So many photos, so little time.http://www.peekaboo.me.uk - general portfolio & tutorialshttp://www.boo-photos.co.uk - live music portfoliohttp://imageevent.com/boophotos/ - most recent images.

Please do not amend and re-post my images unless specifically requested or given permission to do so...

Comment #18

I thought I read that the EOS350/D40 end of the market don't have autofocus and you need to have a lens with auto focus option... (please forgive my ignorance)...

Http://www.flickr.com/photos/tim_norris/..

Comment #19

ThatBoyTim wrote:.

I thought I read that the EOS350/D40 end of the market don't haveautofocus and you need to have a lens with auto focus option...(please forgive my ignorance)...

You're right (more or less) ... though I *think* it's limited to the Nikon D40 & D40x. Nikon (along with Pentax & Minolta) implemented autofocus with a motor in the camera body that turned the lens through a mechanical linkage, while Canon started with in-lens AF motors from the beginning. Nikon has since redesigned many of their lenses to have in-lens motors (and Sony now has 2 such lenses, with at least a couple more announced and Pentax is moving in that direction, too). Cameras by these companies still include in-body AF motors for compatibility with older lenses, but Nikon dropped the AF motor from the D40 & D40x to reduce cost & weight under the assumption that it wouldn't matter much to the "target market" (people who might buy a couple zoom lenses, not an old 28/2.8)..

Definitely something to research better before you make up your mind..

- DennisGallery at http://kingofthebeasts.smugmug.com..

Comment #20

You have some really cool pictures in your gallery. I think you're really going to like a dslr. Good luck...

Comment #21

ThatBoyTim wrote:.

Can someone please explain how it works? My Fuji has what I believeto be an 18-55mm lens or 6.3-63mm focal length (38-380mm equiv) and a10x optical zoom... I like the 10x zoom and I want to make sure thatI get an lens with my DSLR (D40, EOS350 etc) that can achieve thesame...

I read about half way through this thread, to the point where you got frustrated and lost control of it. Let's go back....

Your Fuji does not have an 18-55mm lens. That is a 3X zoom lens (you divide the big # by the little # to get the "zoom RATIO". It DOES have a 6.3-63mm lens...a 10X zoom ratio. Don't try to reproduce this range on a dSLR. A dSLR is a MUCH bigger tool and the equivalent 10X zoom (ie, 38-380mm) does not exist...if it did, it would be huge and expensive..

Am I missing the point?.

Perhaps? At least you were confused by the 18-55mm...where did you get that idea?.

In general, as the sensor gets bigger, the zoom ratio must get smaller. If you violate this "rule", you have to pay with IQ and/or $$..

With a dSLR, a 5X zoom ratio is BIG! You need to plan on two 5X zooms or three 3X zooms with your new dSLR. If that is not acceptable, don't go there!.

Charlie DavisNikon 5700, Sony R1, Nikon D300HomePage: http://www.1derful.infoBridge Blog: http://www.here-ugo.com/BridgeBlog/..

Comment #22

Some of your comments were covered more or less in the posts you skipped. Don't skip looking at his gallery. He is a really good photographer...

Comment #23

Chuxter wrote:.

Don't try to reproduce thisrange on a dSLR. A dSLR is a MUCH bigger tool and the equivalent 10Xzoom (ie, 38-380mm) does not exist...if it did, it would be huge andexpensive..

18-250 on APS-C ? .

Sure, it's a compromise lens, but it's a compromise lens that a heck of a lot of DSLR owners have bought..

Whether that's 'better' than a 10X digicam depends on the reasons for considering a DSLR in the first place..

Edit: just saw that later post in which the OP says he considers his digicam a jack of all trades and wants to improve images ... in which case, I tend to agree with your suggestions..

- DennisGallery at http://kingofthebeasts.smugmug.com..

Comment #24

Hi,.

I can't see anything wrong with these that you might want to improve. What am I missing?.

Regards, David.

ThatBoyTim wrote:.

I want to firstly improve the quality of my photos..I want to shoot faster - people, family, life, street..I want to shoot outdors and landscapes.. Wiltshire is a beautifulplace and I want to capture it better...

Take a look at my photo stream on Flickr (ignore some of the recentphotoshop fun!) and hopefully you will get an idea of what I like todo and agree with me that I am ready to move on to DSLR....

Http://www.flickr.com/photos/tim_norris/.

Thanks, Tim..

Comment #25

ThatBoyTim wrote:.

Now I want to get more serious and improve the quality of my photos,and when you get more serious there isn't really such a thing as ajack of all trades....

The two (jack of all and serious photography) don't really go hand inhand...

Then consider chuxters recent post ... the 18-250 zoom that would match/exceed your 38-380 equivalent is a jack of all trades lens. A DSLR offers responsiveness and a viewing system that some people like, but if you're after image quality and/or opening possibilities (low light, fast shutter speed for action, macro, etc) then you need to consider more specialized lenses..

- DennisGallery at http://kingofthebeasts.smugmug.com..

Comment #26

One of the most important things when going from P&S to DSLR is to get rid of the P&S mindset. Wheras in P&S one tends to think of zoom factor (3x zoom, 5x zoom, etc), in DSLR it's all about mm..

Look at it this way: While your camera may have a 10x zoom, it's still only a 6.3-63mm lens. A given focal length is the same regardless of what camera it is on... Nothing in the world will change that. What will change from camera to camera for a given focal length is the field of view. This is nothing new to digital. A 50mm lens on a 35mm film camera gives a much narrower field of view than a 50mm lens on a medium or large format camera.

The difference being that the image in your camera is severely cropped to give the illusion of using a longer lens. Using a 200mm lens on a DSLR will give you slightly less field of view than your camera at 63mm - but it will resolve more than 3 times the detail..

BTW... looking at the samples you posted, I have to say you have a good eye for composition..

ThatBoyTim wrote:.

IMac - my question was what we call rhetorical (I expect that isspelt wrong.)....

Also my zoom on my Fuji is great fun - and it seems that you have topay a lot to have that fun with a DSLR!.

I am ready for the step to DSLR and I know about post processing andthose other things you mention - my only question was wtf do all thelens/focal length figures mean and how do I get the same zoomequivalent in a DSLR....

Some cool cats that can use your helphttp://www.wildlife-sanctuary.org.

Even if you can't donate, please help spread the word...

Comment #27

ThatBoyTim wrote:.

I want to firstly improve the quality of my photos..I want to shoot faster - people, family, life, street..I want to shoot outdors and landscapes.. Wiltshire is a beautifulplace and I want to capture it better...

First of all, you're doing great with he camera you have..

Here's where I think a DSLR might help you:.

1) Lower light. Between a DSLR's better sensitivity and a lens like a 50mm f/1.8, you could shoot on the street in way lower light..

2) Wide angle. Right now you're starting at 38mm equivalent. An 18mm lens on a DSLR gets you 28mm equiv. Other lenses go wider still. Something like the Canon 10-22mm would be great for very wide angle landscapes. An "all-in-one" lens like an 18-200 would offer a little better wide angle, but not nearly what you get at 10 or 12mm..

3) External flash. Direct flash looks lousy. External units are much more powerful and can be bounced or used with diffusers..

4) DSLR's are much faster..

I don't know what your budget is, but this would be a great setup:Canon 450D (aka XSi) w/18-55 IS lensCanon 10-22 lensCanon 55-250 IS lensCanon 50 f/1.8 lensCanon 430EX flash.

This would be about $2200 US. Of course there are less as well as more expensive options, and there's no need to get it all at once. Nikon and others make great cameras as well..

Keep up the good work!..

Comment #28

Dennis wrote:.

Chuxter wrote:.

Don't try to reproduce thisrange on a dSLR. A dSLR is a MUCH bigger tool and the equivalent 10Xzoom (ie, 38-380mm) does not exist...if it did, it would be huge andexpensive..

18-250 on APS-C ? .

Yes. But I said that a 38-380 lens didn't exist. Mount a 2.0TC with an 18-200mm and you have 36-400. This is pretty close, but I think a good super-zoom DC will beat the IQ of that combo! And it will focus better...think how slow a D80 will focus with an f7.0 - f11.2 lens!!! Heck, it might NEVER find focus?.

Sure, it's a compromise lens, but it's a compromise lens that a heckof a lot of DSLR owners have bought..

Whether that's 'better' than a 10X digicam depends on the reasons forconsidering a DSLR in the first place..

When Japan, Inc. decided around 2004 to stop building true "bridge" DCs and to migrate those customers to entry-level dSLRs, it was inevitable that a big zoom ratio lens would appear..

Edit: just saw that later post in which the OP says he considers hisdigicam a jack of all trades and wants to improve images ... in whichcase, I tend to agree with your suggestions..

Thanks....

Charlie DavisNikon 5700, Sony R1, Nikon D300HomePage: http://www.1derful.infoBridge Blog: http://www.here-ugo.com/BridgeBlog/..

Comment #29

Thanks for you kind comments on my photos - this means a lot...

I had a good look at the EOS400D on Sunday and have all but made up my mind - now I need to decide on an extra lens to give me that 10x zoom - er I mean longer focal length!.

Sigma vs Tamron : 200mm vs 300mm.

How much of the quality will be lost at the 300mm end on these 'budget' lenses?.

Http://www.flickr.com/photos/tim_norris/..

Comment #30

Devnull wrote:.

ThatBoyTim wrote:.

Someone tell me "Why do I want a DSLR" again?.

Why do you want a camera, if zoom ratio is that important to you? Youcan get a video cam which will easily get 20-30-40-etc zoom... And itmight take still photos, too..

Dafted answer on a forum I have ever read - congratulations.....

Comment #31

ThatBoyTim wrote:.

I had a good look at the EOS400D.

That's nice but did you cop a feel too ? The 400D is really unpleasant to hold for many people compared to other entry level DSLRs. When I tried them all at the shop the Pentax K100D, K10D, Olympus e510 and Nikon D80 really felt oh so much better in my hands...

Comment #32

Hi tim, like your flickr....

When you say you're looking at the 200 or 300 mm, that's confusing! if I say I want a 200mm lens that's no zoom at all! that's fixed at 200mm. that's a fixed telephoto. it only has one focal length..

Now if you want "zoom", so you can take a shot of the kids inside from close and a shot of the kids outside from far away, you need a lens with zoom. if you want to do that without changing lenses, you need a lot of zoom. don't confuse zoom with telephoto. you can get a 10-20mm zoom, it's a zoom not because it magnifies things that are far away a wide angle zoom makes things look further away it's a zoom because it has more than one focal length: it goes from 10mm to 20mm..

I suggest you just get your kit lens until you understand this focal length stuff. you'll find it isn't as limiting as you might think because you have old-fashioned zoom! "sneaker zoom". move your feet!.

Many people think they need lots of telephoto and go for the big lenses straight up. but you might find you when you get into it a little, you don't need this reach very often and have other priorities...

Comment #33

ThatBoyTim wrote:.

Thanks for you kind comments on my photos - this means a lot...

I had a good look at the EOS400D on Sunday and have all but made upmy mind - now I need to decide on an extra lens to give me that 10xzoom - er I mean longer focal length!.

"need an extra lens" - This suggests you have a lens, the kit?, whats the focal length?.

Sigma vs Tamron : 200mm vs 300mm.

I agree with Bugzie, your question isn't clear. If you have 18mm-55m then you would need to cover 55-200 or 55-300. But if you have no lens then you'd probably need 18-200 or 18-300. Let us know what lens you have..

How much of the quality will be lost at the 300mm end on these'budget' lenses?.

Http://www.flickr.com/photos/tim_norris/..

Comment #34

Bugzie wrote:.

Hi tim, like your flickr....

When you say you're looking at the 200 or 300 mm, that's confusing!if I say I want a 200mm lens that's no zoom at all! that's fixed at200mm. that's a fixed telephoto. it only has one focal length..

Maybe I am not 'down' with the correct terminology but I meant a 55-200mm or 55-300mm (I guess I can't shorten these things) - these type of lenses are available from Tamron and Sigma at quite a reasonable price...

Are they any good.?.

And yes at this stage I expect to get the 18-55 Kit.http://www.flickr.com/photos/tim_norris/..

Comment #35

ThatBoyTim wrote:.

Dafted answer on a forum I have ever read - congratulations....

That usually would have got you a well thought answer..

But you know what, it's Monday, it's the beginner forum and I am feeling a bit sadistic. So I'll ask you a favor!.

Please, 6 months to a year AFTER you have bought your first SLR and either a good zoom (f2.8) or a prime lens AND you have learned to use them, reread this thread. Check your... questions and my daft answer. And if you'll feel you have something to add, please do..

Good luck!.

/d/n..

Comment #36

IMac, therefore iAm wrote:.

Using a 200mm lens on a DSLR will give you slightly less field of view than yourcamera at 63mm - but it will resolve more than 3 times the detail..

BTW... looking at the samples you posted, I have to say you have agood eye for composition..

Thanks for your comments - I am getting more confused - Time to sit and read properly and carefully......

Comment #37

ThatBoyTim wrote:.

Bugzie wrote:.

Hi tim, like your flickr....

When you say you're looking at the 200 or 300 mm, that's confusing!if I say I want a 200mm lens that's no zoom at all! that's fixed at200mm. that's a fixed telephoto. it only has one focal length..

Maybe I am not 'down' with the correct terminology but I meant a55-200mm or 55-300mm (I guess I can't shorten these things) - thesetype of lenses are available from Tamron and Sigma at quite areasonable price...

Are they any good.?.

They're probably pretty good, but Canon's are some of the best in existence. I'd hold out for the Canon 55-250 IS. A big part of the reason to get a Canon or Nikon camera is to get their lenses..

Greg..

Comment #38

Devnull wrote:.

ThatBoyTim wrote:.

Dafted answer on a forum I have ever read - congratulations....

That usually would have got you a well thought answer..

But you know what, it's Monday, it's the beginner forum and I amfeeling a bit sadistic. So I'll ask you a favor!.

Please, 6 months to a year AFTER you have bought your first SLR andeither a good zoom (f2.8) or a prime lens AND you have learned to usethem, reread this thread. Check your... questions and my daftanswer. And if you'll feel you have something to add, please do..

Good luck!.

What do you expect him to say after 6 months. His thread said he was confused about focal length and he asked appropriate questions in relation to what focal lengths he was currently using. Six months from now he probably won't be confused and he can look back and say yes I did not understand focal lengths as explained in my post of 6 months ago. I think you're just grumpy and beginners are an easy target. .

/d/n..

Comment #39

ThatBoyTim wrote:.

And yes at this stage I expect to get the 18-55 Kit..

Shoot with the kit lens for 3-6 months and then you'll know what lens to get next. You're obsessing too much over zoom ranges. Seriously, don't overspend on lenses you don't know will do it for you on a new platform. Get experience, then you'll be in a much better position and still have the money to do something about it..

Paulhttp://PaulDRobertson.imagekind.com..

Comment #40

ThatBoyTim wrote:.

Bugzie wrote:.

...when you say you're looking at the 200 or 300 mm, that's confusing!if I say I want a 200mm lens that's no zoom at all! that's fixed at200mm. that's a fixed telephoto. it only has one focal length..

Maybe I am not 'down' with the correct terminology but I meant a55-200mm or 55-300mm (I guess I can't shorten these things) -.

Not if you expect people to understand you!.

These type of lenses are available from Tamron and Sigma at quite areasonable price...

Are they any good.?.

ALL lens manufacturers make a range of lens qualities...even N & C. If you buy a high-end lens from Sigma (as an example), it will be quite good. Those high IQ Sigma lenses have "EX" on the side and a gold ring. The best Sigma lenses are less expensive than equivalent lenses from N & C, but not by much. You sorta get what you pay for...a $200 Sigma will not be as good as a $1000 Nikkor! Not even close!.

Read the lens reviews?.

Charlie DavisNikon 5700, Sony R1, Nikon D300HomePage: http://www.1derful.infoBridge Blog: http://www.here-ugo.com/BridgeBlog/..

Comment #41

Firstly - Thanks for your second 'constructive' comment to a confused beginner...

Secondly - Why would I want a camcorder to take photos? Isn't this forum hosted by Digital Photography Review - not Video Camera Review..

Thirdly - If you were capable of "a well thought answer" why didn't you give one in the first place?.

Finally - Your IDEEA photos are very good...http://photo.net/photodb/folder?folder_id=451496.

I don't hold a grudge...

Timhttp://www.flickr.com/photos/tim_norris/..

Comment #42

A 300mm lens on that camera you are talking about, the rebel, will be equivent to about 480mm lens, thats long!..

Comment #43

ThatBoyTim wrote:.

Firstly - Thanks for your second 'constructive' comment to a confusedbeginner...

Please define "confused"  Or, ellaborate on that word..

Secondly - Why would I want a camcorder to take photos?.

Because you insisted that you want a large, 10x, zoom ratio. Basically all the dslr + one lens combos that yield 10x are optically worse compromises than your camera. If you want large zoom ratio and you are not happy with the digicam, the camcorder is in many ways a better compromise than a slr, especially with regard to the zoom ratio..

Isn't thisforum hosted by Digital Photography Review - not Video Camera Review..

It says digital _PHOTOGRAPHY_ review. The concept includes everything, from phone cameras to camcorders with still capability. Yep, I am nitpicking, but so were you..

Thirdly - If you were capable of "a well thought answer" why didn'tyou give one in the first place?.

It was an ironic placeholder for "harsh rebuttal". Nope, you're still not getting one..

Finally - Your IDEEA photos are very good...http://photo.net/photodb/folder?folder_id=451496.

Thank you. You have some good photos, as well, but you need not to dilute them in the others. Make a better selection. I should do the same, I know..

I don't hold a grudge...

That makes two of us./d/n..

Comment #44

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