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Largest image sensor for P+S camera?
In my quest to find the right camera for my needs, I've learned that the SIZE of the image sensor is of utmost importance. Problem is that it seems this info is not easy to uncover. Most P+S cameras advertise zoom and MP only. So does anyone know which P+S has the largest image sensors??? Then I can compare the zoom and MP of these large sensor types. Thanks...

Comments (6)

My response in your other threadhttp://forums.dpreview.com/...forums/read.asp?forum=1002&message=24850537.

No doubt there are a few others than the ones I aware of..

Good Day,Roonal.

'Money doesn't buy happiness, but it makes for an extravagant depression' by golf tournament sportscaster..

Comment #1

Less MP = Better and Bigger sensor= betterstill the brand of the camera makes the complete feeling of the photo.sensor sizes are shown for every camera in the specs... sooo... check it out..

(Canon G9 and A650).

Image control:Zoom outZoom 100%Zoom inExpand AllOpen in new window..

Comment #2

Strictly speaking, it's not the size of the sensor that matters, but rather the size of the photosites. Now the bigger the sensor, the bigger the sites for a given #MP. Of course, the more MP you have, the smaller the photosites are for a given sensor size..

Anyways... The Sony R1 had an APS-C size sensor, though most people probably wouldn't consider this a P+S. There's also a camera Sigma was supposedly going to release, called the DP1, which also uses a APS size (Foveon) sensor. For now, the 2/3" sensor appears to be the largest you can get in a "compact P+S", with few if any manufactures even supporting this "standard" anymore...

Comment #3

That depends on what you consider point and shoot, actually. Oh, I know what you mean, the non-SLR type. I just wanted to throw in the idea that you *can* shoot a pro camera like a point and shoot. Most offer some sort of fully automatic mode. So technically the largest sensor (on a 35mm system) is 24mmx36mm, a full frame SLR..

For actual P&S shoot cameras, check out the dpreview specs on the cameras as another poster pointed out..

Before shopping on sensor size alone, ask yourself what you'll be using it for. Low light? I hear Fuji makes some cameras with great high-ISO performance. Small size? Canon makes the digital Elph that is tiny and popular. The list goes on.....

Comment #4

I'd like to buy an easy-to-use camera that doesn't require changing lenses, but that had the capability of producing acceptable quality prints of fast action in low light. For example at a hockey game in an indoor arena. I realize that this type of setting requires a large zoom and a fast shutter speed to "freeze the action". By "acceptable quality" I mean that I wouldn't be making prints larger than 5X7, but would like them to look okay, not obviously grainy, but need not be "perfect" by professional standards. I know that non-SLRs have their limitations, especially at high ISO, but if a non-SLR can accomplish this for me, then that's what I would prefer, as oppposed to carrying exta lenses around for a SLR (even though I know the quality would be far more superior with a SLR). Even after reading the specs of cameras that interest me, I'm still not clear which ones would function well for fast action in low light.

Any help is appreciated!..

Comment #5

Twoboysmom wrote:.

I'd like to buy an easy-to-use camera that doesn't require changinglenses, but that had the capability of producing acceptable qualityprints of fast action in low light. For example at a hockey game inan indoor arena. I realize that this type of setting requires alarge zoom and a fast shutter speed to "freeze the action". By"acceptable quality" I mean that I wouldn't be making prints largerthan 5X7, but would like them to look okay, not obviously grainy, butneed not be "perfect" by professional standards. I know thatnon-SLRs have their limitations, especially at high ISO, but if anon-SLR can accomplish this for me, then that's what I would prefer,as oppposed to carrying exta lenses around for a SLR (even though Iknow the quality would be far more superior with a SLR). Even afterreading the specs of cameras that interest me, I'm still not clearwhich ones would function well for fast action in low light.

Any help is appreciated!.

Well, sounds like the Sony R1 (if you can still find it) would be perfect for you. It is basically an SLR with a good non-interchangeable lens. It has a 14.3 - 71.5mm (24-120mm) lens (5x zoom) and has good high ISO for hockey. However, it is not very compact - basically as big as a small entry level SLR...

Comment #6

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This question was taken from a support group/message board and re-posted here so others can learn from it.

 

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