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jpeg to tiff
Can someone give me a very basic, brief description of what converting a jpeg to tiff actually does and will it affect the image quality when I go to print the image? Thanks...

Comments (13)

Buzzardbob wrote:.

Can someone give me a very basic, brief description of whatconverting a jpeg to tiff actually does and will it affect the imagequality when I go to print the image? Thanks..

Certainly it won't degrade the image, since tiff is lossless. I'm not sure there's any advantage if you're not editing the jpg - the main difference will be a larger file. If you're editing the jpg, then tiff is a good format to save it to since there's no compression as there would be if you saved back to a jpg..

Mark..

Comment #1

Great. The reason I was asking is that I was trying to figure out how to save an edited image in DPP and still have the original image in case I didn't really like the edit. I was successful in keeping both and wanted to know basically what it all means. But so long as I haven't lost anything that is fine. Thanks for the reply...

Comment #2

I shoot jpeg all the time. when I download my pics to the pc, I do a sort then delete the ones I do not want, they go to pe6 or cs2 for pp if any, then they are saved as a tiff, the originals are put into a jpeg holdall folder for any future needs if any. any other work is done off the tiffs(the original jpegs are not touched). my shots are done in adobeRGB if a sRGB pics is needed I make it off the tiff..

There is no difference between the jpeg or the tiff; they are identical. the difference is that the tiff can be reedited any number of times wih no change in the image. the jpeg will slowly have a loss in IQ with each later save..

I get around that by going from the camera jpeg to a tiff immediately after any editing using save as, the jpeg is never save which is what is causing the loss of IQ...

Comment #3

Buzzardbob wrote:.

Great. The reason I was asking is that I was trying to figure outhow to save an edited image in DPP and still have the original imagein case I didn't really like the edit. I was successful in keepingboth and wanted to know basically what it all means. But so long as Ihaven't lost anything that is fine. Thanks for the reply..

Hi,.

Make two folders and keep them apart. put the original in one and then take it from there as a copy to the CD or DVD backup..

Use the other copy for working on and that way you'll always have the original for when mistakes happen (and they do...) ..

Regards, David..

Comment #4

I don't know what program you're editing in but if you use the native file format for that program for working files, you won't lose an IQ either. Photoshop, use psd files. Painter, use riff files. Then when the image is the way you want it, save as either a jpg or a tiff...

Comment #5

Converting a jpeg to tiff doesn't make sense. When the original file is compressed to a jpeg, loads of useful information are discarded - and you can't restore it to original quality by saving it as tiff..

Http://lordofthelens.smugmug.com/..

Comment #6

I do not use native formats, nor do I wish to, jpeg and tiff are fine. besides if I used native formats then I would have to use software programs that use it, and would eliminate many 3rd party software programs that I do use...

Comment #7

Who said I want to restore it? are you kidding? I do not want to loose any more, which is what would happen if the file was simply save. i/you could not get back to the original picture because it doesn't exist anymore. it was written over using the save process...

Comment #8

GaryDeM wrote:.

There is no difference between the jpeg or the tiff; they areidentical. the difference is that the tiff can be reedited any numberof times wih no change in the image. the jpeg will slowly have a lossin IQ with each later save..

Not quite. JPEG allows for a "lossy" compression of the file. Information can be thrown out in an attempt to make the file smaller. TIFF, as has been pointed out is either not compressed (the default) or compressed via a method that does not lose information..

The problem occurs if you save a JPEG file multiple times (think multiple edits). You then lose more and more data and eventually you can see the effects in jagged edges and horrid color blotches..

You CAN save JPEGs without compression - usually by saving them in the "best" quality the program offers. You just have to either remember to do that or set your program defaults that way..

The other potential downside for JPEG is that it is an 8 bit format - the data is only chopped up into 255 levels of black to white. Again, if you're not manipulating the image much, this isn't a big problem, but if you change a curve significantly you might find that the smooth gradation in colors gets botched up and you see "banding" or "posterization". TIFF can work with 16 bit data which gets you 4096 levels of grey so you have more room to fiddle. If you work with RAW files (as opposed to JPEGs) you should save the initial file as a 16 bit tiff for most of the editing workflow. Once I get to my final image, I save it as an 8 bit to save some space and, more importantly, decrease the image load times in Bridge or whatever..

As has been mentioned, the biggest mistake is not saving an untouched copy of whatever the image was created in. You can never go home if you do that....

RGhttp://www.lostrange.com..

Comment #9

Regarding the image degradation of saving JPEG images multiple times: I've heard of this many times but haven't experienced it in real life. Yes, we all know that information is being discarded, but when saving with a JPEG with a quality of 12 (the highest in Photoshop), can anybody actually SEE the difference?.

Actually, if you're really worried about information being lost, you could shoot in RAW and develop JPEGs/TIFFs/PSDs for all of your needs and consult the original RAW file whenever you want...

Comment #10

Sorry this must be a misunderstanding - I was answering the original post not yours..

Http://lordofthelens.smugmug.com/..

Comment #11

Hi,.

The strange thing is that we are continually doing this when viewing on screen. And my money's on people only printing about 3 or 5% of their pictures and viewing the rest on screen or (even worse quality) in a digital picture frame..

Years ago I wondered why I keep set of photo's in the laptop at 4 or 5 megapixels when the laptop will only show them at 1024 x 768. So I made a set of everything , back to when I started, to fit 1024 x 768 or 768 x 576 for portraits and something weird for 16:9 that I can't remember off the cuff..

I also experimented with the best to worse quality slider by making a few sets of ten copies of the same picture and you'd be amazed how small the file can be and show well on screen. Here's a sample - intended just for on screen viewing, not printing..

Image control:Zoom outZoom 100%Zoom inExpand AllOpen in new window.

That's 4224 x 2376 or 10 mp's reduced to 1024 x 576 and 395 KB. And that makes it hard for people to steal it for their calendars....

Regards, David..

Comment #12

Buzzardbob wrote:.

Can someone give me a very basic, brief description of whatconverting a jpeg to tiff actually does and will it affect the imagequality when I go to print the image? Thanks..

A tiff file when compressed to a smaller size retains the data to restore the original size if you wish. A jpeg file when compressed to a suitable monitor display size does not store that data. You can't get the original back. That's why tiff files are huge and jpegs are not..

If you have an original full size jpeg and want to make changes to it, you should duplicate it, put it back in the file where it came from and then make changes to your duplicate. After your changes, save the duplicate as the file type you need it as. If you need a tiff, convert it to a tiff. If you need a jpeg, save it full size at the highest quality setting and while there may be some irretrievable data loss, you would have to open it and resave it multiple times to notice it, more times than any sane person would open it, change it and resave it. Dozens of times before the data loss would be visible to the naked eye if you use the highest quality setting and don't decrease the size of the image. And if you open it just to view it and make no changes, there is no saving to be done, no data loss.



If you save your processed jpeg as a jpeg, (saving a jpeg as a tiff only make sense if you specifically need a tiff file) keep this duplicate with it's changes as an another original (full size,highest quality) and in the future if you you want to resize it for the web or for printing you can duplicate it and do so. Just remember when making changes to a jpeg, to always preserve your original and only make changes to a duplicate..

Some people talk about jpeg like it's evil and useless. I think it's fantastic. I sure as heck can't post a raw image or PSD online. As the post with the train photo shows, jpeg compression is a method to resize images smaller in image size and/or smaller in file size with the data loss not being apparent to the eye. It can make a very noisy or poor quality photo presentable just by resizing it small enough. It's lossy method of compression is not all bad..

If you save your full size original jpeg from the camera (or the original of one you have proecessed) and duplicate it, then perform jpeg compression of the duplicate for monitor viewing, there is indeed a loss of information in the resized file. But so what? It still looks nice. That's the point of jpeg compression. And the original is still intact with no data loss to do the same thing any time you want and present it at any size you want. Open it, duplicate it, put it back where you got it from, perform jpeg compression on the duplicate. No data loss to the original...

Comment #13

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This question was taken from a support group/message board and re-posted here so others can learn from it.

 

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