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I have a 70-200 lens with my D80. If I increase the ISO, does that increase the shutter speed?..

Comments (45)

Yes it does, if you have an ISO of 100 and a shutter speed of 1/30th, you can set the ISO to 200 and reduce the shutter speed by half to 1/60th, increase the ISO again to 400 and you can reduce the speed of the shutter to 1/125..

Be aware with ISO you can run into noise problems, so know what the limits are for ISO on your camera. Just because you can set the ISO to 3200 means nothing as noise will kick in before then. On a DSLR the upper limits of ISO for you will be either 400, 800, or 1600 depending on the camera model.Rationally I have no hope, irrationally I believe in miracles.Joni Mitchell..

Comment #1

OK...what is the upper limit for the D80? When you speak of noise, does that mean fuzziness or less detail?..

Comment #2

Stevehabig wrote:.

OK...what is the upper limit for the D80? When you speak of noise,does that mean fuzziness or less detail?.

Noise generally refers to a grainy look to the picture..

I don't know the limit for the D80. I do know that "the limit" depends on the scene. For example, high ISO for several seconds in dim light may result in noise. High ISO with adequate light will result in less or no noise..

I have found that the major problem with high ISO is that the picture will have a washed out look if light is not adequate. My wife has a very colorful plate that I photographed one night in the house. I had one light on in the room which was enough to focus, but I had to increase the ISO to 1600. One bland picture. I then added flash and the picture was great, even at ISO 1600..

FINE PRINT: I reserve the right to be wrong. Should you prove me wrong, I reserve the right to change my mind...

Comment #3

Thank you. I have been told to use a high ISO when phoyographing indoor basketball. Not sure how high to go...

Comment #4

Stevehabig wrote:.

Thank you. I have been told to use a high ISO when phoyographingindoor basketball. Not sure how high to go..

I am no pro and I have a D200 not a D80. However I can offer some suggestions..

Basketball is an action scene with low light (usually) conditions..

Your first concern should be to get a shot that is focused. This means a fast shutter speed..

Your second concern should be the aperture used. A wider aperture will allow a faster shutter speed. The problem, however, is that with a wider aperture your depth of field may be reduced more than you would like..

Your third concern should be exposure. Before the game try shooting with several high ISOs and look at the result. Check your histogram. If you are sitting midway on one side of the court, take pictures of each basket and the center of the court. Select the ISO that produces the best result..

When you get home and look at the pictures on your monitor, or you print them out, they should be focused and well exposed. From these pictures you will know if there is a noise or washed out problem or not..

Be sure to get as close the the court as you can. Remember, the more you zoom the darker the lens becomes. This means a slower shutter speed or larger aperture must be used..

How familiar are you with Auto ISO?.

FINE PRINT: I reserve the right to be wrong. Should you prove me wrong, I reserve the right to change my mind...

Comment #5

Hi,.

Just a point, you should experiment as Bill Randall said but print the things out and see if you like them and if others do. I say that because (with the exception of portraits of females) most people are far less critical than the photographer. Also, technicalities are not important of the shot is good. And a bit of grain or noise can add character to a print. Hollywood spends a fortune at times to imitate it..

Regards, David..

Comment #6

Let's back the bus up here, for a second..

Changing the ISO does absolutely NOTHING to the shutter speed. Changing the ISO changes the way that the sensor reacts to light. BY CHANGING the way the sensor reacts to light it allows you to use a higher shutter speed or a smaller aperture. ISO and all other factors (Shutter speed, aperture} involved in EXPOSURE are intertwined. By changing one you have options in the others that weren't available before. I might change the ISO to get one more stop of shutter speed, or a smaller aperture if I need more DOF..

Try this on for size: Shutter speed, Aperture, ISO.

1/125-F/16-1001/250-F/11-1001/60-F/22-1001/500-F/8-100.

All four of these are the same exposure ,each will allow the same amount of light to expose the sensor. I didn't change the ISO to get a higher shutter speed..

Now let's get back to your question:.

Let's say you want to go from a shutter speed of 1/60 to 1/125 and you are at your maximum aperture of F/4 at ISO 100. There are two basic ways you can do this, either get a lens that has a larger maximum aperture F/2.8 or increase the ISO to tell the sensor to meter different light levels. If you increase the ISO to 400 (1Stop) you now shoot at a shutter speed of 1/125 at F/4.0 because you've told the meter that you have one more stop of light to work with. In old film terms, you've pushed your film 1 Stop. But this way your camera takes care of all the processing..

Test your camera at the different ISO's expose the same scene at different ISO's compare the images, you'll see that the ones shot at higher ISO's have a more grainy appearance, that's noise. Once you've done the comparison you'll have a much better handle on which combinations of ISO and exposure settings will yield the best acceptable results for your situations...

Comment #7

Squirt wrote:Let's back the bus up here, for a second..

Changing the ISO does absolutely NOTHING to the shutter speed..

I think you just backed the bus over the simple fact that when you change the ISO, the shutter speed *does* change....

Increase the ISO and the shutter speed gets faster. Decrease the ISO and the shutter speed slows down....

That is quite different than "changing the ISO does absolutely NOTHING to the shutter speed"....

The rest of your post is good....

BobPhotography is more about depth of feeling than depth of fieldhttp://www.pbase.com/mofongo..

Comment #8

The poster was correct - changing ISO does NOT change shutter speed - these things CAN be independent of each other..

The issue is what changing ISO does do. It makes the sensor more sensitive and therefore registers light more easily. We'll skip the details of how it does this but in broad terms you trade more noise for more sensitivity when you increase ISO. This is why we usually try to keep ISO as low as possible..

What this gets you relates to how a camera exposes to capture an image. It opens the shutter for a particular time and with a particular aperture. In every mode but 'M' the camera will calculate the required shutter and/or aperture values it thinks are best for the shot to get enough light. Increasing ISO means it can use either a narrower aperture or ( more usually ) a shorter shutter speed. In low light you raise ISO to allow a reasonably fast shutter speed or just to get enough light in. A slow shutter speed means blur ( motion and/or shake ) and hence the usefulness of raising ISO..

The trick is to balance ISO, aperture and shutter speed to get as close to the result you want as possible..

In low light you need to do all or some of these things :.

(1) Raise ISO(2) Use a wide aperture ( which on a DSLR may mean selecting a suitable lens )(3) Use a longer exposure ( low shutter speed )..

In sports (3) is not desirable and (1) is often not wanted either, to avoid noise. This is why at sports events you will see photographers with huge lenses - these are the lenses with both a long range and a wide aperture. They tend to be expensive and heavy..

Essentially a camera operates in one of five types of exposure mode. Scene modes are variations on these. Not all cameras have all these modes. A scene mode like sports would be biased to choose as high a shutter speed as possible up to a sensible limit ( in general )..

In what follows 'selects' means the camera chooses from a range of possible values based on a metering calculation..

(1) Auto everything ( Auto ).

The camera selects shutter speed and aperture.If you selected auto ISO then the camera selects ISO as well.You point, get focus and shoot..

(2) 'P' mode ( Program Mode also known as Program Shift Mode ).

The camera selects shutter speed and aperture.You may select ISO ( or use Auto ) and get focus and shoot.If you select Auto ISO the camera will choose ISO for you..

(3) 'A' mode ( Aperture Priority ).

You select Aperture.You may select ISO or you may use auto ISO.The camera selects shutter speed and ISO if you selected auto ISO.You get focus and shoot..

(4) 'S' mode ( Shutter Priority ).

You select shutter speedYou may select ISO or you may use auto ISOThe camera selects aperture and ISO if you used Auto ISO.You get focus and shoot..

(5) 'M' mode ( Manual ).

You select aperture and shutter speeds independently.You mat select ISO or use Auto ISO.The camera does nothing unless it can select ISO.You get focus and shoot..

StephenG.

Pentax K100DFuji S5200Fuji E900PCLinuxOS..

Comment #9

Sjgcit wrote:.

The poster was correct - changing ISO does NOT change shutter speed -these things CAN be independent of each other..

I'm not sure what kind of semantics is being argued here by saying changing ISO does not change shutter speed....

For example, I shoot in aperture priority mode usually. Say I am shooting handheld with a 50mm f1.8 lens wide open at f1.8 and my shutter speed is only 1/30th of a second. I am at ISO 200. Because I want a faster shutter speed to prevent camera blur I increase my ISO to ISO 400. The shutter speed increases....

So, changing ISO *does* change shutter speed....

What are we missing here? I want a faster shutter speed so I increase the ISO....

Seems simple to me....

BobPhotography is more about depth of feeling than depth of fieldhttp://www.pbase.com/mofongo..

Comment #10

Unless I read the example wrong, the poster went from an ISO of 100 to 400 and claimed it was a one stop difference - wrong! At 400 the shutter speed could to go 1/250th as it is a two stop difference: 100 to 200, one stop; 200 to 400 one stop.Rationally I have no hope, irrationally I believe in miracles.Joni Mitchell..

Comment #11

.. only changes the ISO. It does not change anything else. However, it does give the camera a different set of rules to apply. This causes the camera's internal computer chip to make different decisions. A faster shutter might wind up being the result..

Think of ISO as a "light budget." When you set the ISO (or allow the camera to use it's default ISO), you are telling the camera how much light it should expect to have available, or if you prefer, how much light it will need to get a properly exposed shot. When you push the button to take the picture, the camera first measures the amount of light that is actually available at that moment. Then it selects a shutter / aperture combination that will bring in the amount of light you told it to expect.http://www.pbase.com/cbeck.

One does not achieve success by being at the right place at the right time, but rather by being ready when the right place and time present themselves for your inspection...

Comment #12

Mofongo wrote:.

Sjgcit wrote:.

The poster was correct - changing ISO does NOT change shutter speed -these things CAN be independent of each other..

I'm not sure what kind of semantics is being argued here by sayingchanging ISO does not change shutter speed....

For example, I shoot in aperture priority mode usually. Say I amshooting handheld with a 50mm f1.8 lens wide open at f1.8 and myshutter speed is only 1/30th of a second. I am at ISO 200. Because Iwant a faster shutter speed to prevent camera blur I increase my ISOto ISO 400. The shutter speed increases....

So, changing ISO *does* change shutter speed....

What if you shot shutter priority?.

A more correct statement would be that a higher ISO _allows_ a higher shutter speed..

To the OP, you can go up to ISO 800 with minimal impact on image quality. Even 1600 if the alternative is blur or underexposure. Learn how shutter speed, aperture, and ISO all interact...

Comment #13

Greg Nut wrote:What if you shot shutter priority?.

Well, than it would change the aperture....

A more correct statement would be that a higher ISO _allows_ a highershutter speed..

Correct. Thank you for clearing that up for the other two posters who were trying to argue semantics and lure people into a maze of circular logic....

Saying "Changing the ISO does absolutely NOTHING to the shutter speed" makes it sound like changing ISO will never have any effect on shutter speed....

Bob.

Photography is more about depth of feeling than depth of fieldhttp://www.pbase.com/mofongo..

Comment #14

I am not really familiar with auto ISO. I thought that was for when the camera was in auto mode..

So If I understand correctly, I need to set my aperature to 2.8, ISO to 1600, and then the camera selects the shutter speed? If I select 1600 ISO over 800 then the shutter speed is faster?..

Comment #15

I do have a 70-200 2.8. If I set the aperature to 2.8, does the camera set the shutter speed depending on the ISO?..

Comment #16

So the shutter speed IS based on the ISO?..

Comment #17

Stevehabig wrote:.

I have a 70-200 lens with my D80. If I increase the ISO, does thatincrease the shutter speed?.

As others have (finally) explained, the answer is "No"..

Please excuse some of the posters who will try to answer your questions here. Occasionally, they dont have a clue, dont read everything, cant comprehend what they read, cant remember what they comprehended, and/or are too proud to admit it when they @#$% up. At times like this, the forum becomes the Beginners Answers Forum. .

Charlie DavisNikon 5700, Sony R1, Nikon D300HomePage: http://www.1derful.infoBridge Blog: http://www.here-ugo.com/BridgeBlog/..

Comment #18

So in manual mode I can select shutter speed and aperture. Is that the way to go in basketball, wide aperture and fast shutter?..

Comment #19

Stevehabig wrote:I am not really familiar with auto ISO. I thought that was for whenthe camera was in auto mode..

You can use auto ISO in modes other than auto. It will raise the ISO automatically....

So If I understand correctly, I need to set my aperature to 2.8, ISOto 1600, and then the camera selects the shutter speed?.

If you are in aperture priority mode the camera will select the shutter speed....

If I select1600 ISO over 800 then the shutter speed is faster?.

Yes. In aperture priority mode when you increase the ISO your shutter speed increases....

If you have the camera why not just experiment and see what happens to your shutter speed when you increase the ISO?.

Bob.

Photography is more about depth of feeling than depth of fieldhttp://www.pbase.com/mofongo..

Comment #20

When things get moving quickly and I know I'm going to blow it making exposure decisions and I need fast autofosing and rapid shutter fire, I put the camera in sports mode. The sports mode takes into account ISO, movement, shutter speed and aperature; often it will give you the fastest frames per second images as well.Rationally I have no hope, irrationally I believe in miracles.Joni Mitchell..

Comment #21

I will. I assume I need to practice on moving objects. When I shoot at something stationay the shutter speed istays at 1/60 no matter what my ISO is set at...

Comment #22

When I am in A or S priority, my camera does not allow me to use auto mode. It says I am not set for this mode. Do I need to set something in the camera to allow this?..

Comment #23

When I set the ISO, the shutter speed is automatically set when I am in aperture mode? I assume the shutter speed will be based on the type of movement there is? The more movedment, the faster the shutter speed will be?..

Comment #24

Chuxter wrote:.

Stevehabig wrote:I have a 70-200 lens with my D80. If I increase the ISO, does thatincrease the shutter speed?.

As others have (finally) explained, the answer is "No"..

Why would you flat out say no? Put your camera in aperture priority or program mode. Increase your ISO. The shutter speed will increase....

Of course in shutter priority or manual mode it does not....

Please excuse some of the posters who will try to answer yourquestions here. Occasionally, they dont have a clue, dont readeverything, cant comprehend what they read, cant remember what theycomprehended, and/or are too proud to admit it when they @#$% up. Attimes like this, the forum becomes the Beginners Answers Forum. .

How about looking at your own answer. Not helpfull or factual at all....

BobPhotography is more about depth of feeling than depth of fieldhttp://www.pbase.com/mofongo..

Comment #25

Again, when photographing basketball, I can not get continuous shots on my 70-200 due to movement. I have not had problems with other lenses. Would setting the ISO to 1600 help this?..

Comment #26

Stevehabig wrote:.

I assume the shutter speed will be based on thetype of movement there is? The more movedment, the faster theshutter speed will be?.

No. The amount of movement will not determine the shutter speed. The more movement the higher shutter speed you must set. It is not automatically set by the amount of movement in the scene..

In regards to Auto ISO. The advantage of this is that you set the Minimum Shutter Speed to be used as well as the Maximum ISO. Auto ISO will alway try to use the lowest ISO..

Auto ISO is not as simple as indicated above, it does not operate exactly the same way in P, S, A and M modes. In addition, if there is not enough light for the Min SS and Max ISO you set it WILL use a lower shutter speed (D200)..

The lighting will not be constant all over the court. Especially with players on the court. Auto ISO will make the adjustments..

Your manual should explain Auto ISO for your camera..

FINE PRINT: I reserve the right to be wrong. Should you prove me wrong, I reserve the right to change my mind...

Comment #27

Mofongo wrote:.

Why would you flat out say no? Put your camera in aperture priorityor program mode. Increase your ISO. The shutter speed will increase....

Of course in shutter priority or manual mode it does not....

When you increase ISO the sensor becomes more sensitive to light. Think of this as allowing more light to come into the camera. With more light coming into the camera you may find that either the camera will increase shutter speed (depending on the mode you are shooting in) or you will be able to manually increase the shutter speed and get the correct exposure..

FINE PRINT: I reserve the right to be wrong. Should you prove me wrong, I reserve the right to change my mind...

Comment #28

Everyone else answered your question, so I just wanted to show you what too much noise looks like. I accidently left it on auto-ISO and when I went to manual and set the shutter and aperture, the ISO went to 1600. Now, my Nikon D300 does ISO 1600 ok, but not on a small crop. Here's the image and an even deeper crop so you can see the noise..

Image control:Zoom outZoom 100%Zoom inExpand AllOpen in new window.

Image control:Zoom outZoom 100%Zoom inExpand AllOpen in new window..

Comment #29

Mofongo wrote:.

Chuxter wrote:.

Stevehabig wrote:I have a 70-200 lens with my D80. If I increase the ISO, does thatincrease the shutter speed?.

As others have (finally) explained, the answer is "No"..

Why would you flat out say no? Put your camera in aperture priorityor program mode. Increase your ISO. The shutter speed will increase....

Of course in shutter priority or manual mode it does not....

Yes, that's why I could not say "yes"..

Please excuse some of the posters who will try to answer yourquestions here. Occasionally, they dont have a clue, dont readeverything, cant comprehend what they read, cant remember what theycomprehended, and/or are too proud to admit it when they @#$% up. Attimes like this, the forum becomes the Beginners Answers Forum. .

How about looking at your own answer. Not helpfull or factual at all....

I was disgusted with your answer. Other posters were helpful and answered the OPs question poperly. I was explaining why over 50% of the replies were wrong..

As an anology, consider an old "analog" radio...one with analog volume and tuning systems. If you de-tune a station, the volume goes down. It would however, be incorrect to contend that the tuning knob controls the volume..

Charlie DavisNikon 5700, Sony R1, Nikon D300HomePage: http://www.1derful.infoBridge Blog: http://www.here-ugo.com/BridgeBlog/..

Comment #30

Steve, you are VERY confused about your new camera. It's hard to know where to start answering ALL your questions! Let me start over....

Your indoor sports venue is THE MOST DIFFICULT one for cameras/lenses. You have, perhaps by accident, chosen good equipment. The D300 and a fast zoom (the 70-200mm F2.8) is a good setup. However, you still need to figure out how to use this tool set. I realize that you are frantically trying to do this..

The D300, like all dSLRs, has several exposure modes. Your first task is to understand which of these modes to use. Please understand that different photographers will use the D300 differently...there are MANY ways to use it and all of these can produce good pix..

But before you pick an exposure mode, you need to understand EXPOSURE. You don't yet. There are 3 things that control exposure: 1) Sensitivity of the sensor, 2) Exposure time, and 3) Lens aperture. Each of these is an INDEPENDENT adjustment...but depending on WHICH exposure mode you pick, the camera can vary all of them simultaneously, making it APPEAR that they are linked in some way. But they are NOT!!! In the automatic modes, the camera is simply doing YOUR work as a photographer. If you don't understand EXPOSURE, you will continually be baffled when the shots don't come out right!.

You also need to understand WHY you need a short exposure time. I think you understand that since there is fast motion involved, the players will be blurred if a slow exposure time is used. A short exposure time is the PRIMARY need in your chosen venue. You need a big aperture (fast lens) and high sensitivity BECAUSE you had to choose a short exposure time. This implies that S-priority is the correct mode. But if you let the camera choose BOTH the f-stop and sensitivity (ISO), you may be disapointed?.

As others have told you, at f2.8 and 200mm, the DOF will be rather small.As others have told you, at high sensitivity (ISO 1600 +) noise will be visible..

YOU have to help the camera a bit here! YOU have to decide whether to compromise with DOF or noise. The camera can't help you!.

I would start out in S-priority, with the exposure time set to 1/500 second. And SEE what the camera recommends for ISO and aperture...this will depend mostly on the lighting, but also on your tongue position. Take a few shots and examine them...see what the noise looks like...see how much is in focus...look at the histogram....

Then, make adjustments. If the noise bothers you more than the shallow DOF, then lower the max ISO (in the Auto-ISO menu). If DOF is too small for you and the camera to accurately get things in focus, then raise the max ISO. You MAY have to take total control of the camera! Put it in M-mode and adjust everything yourself. Hey, photographers did this for a century! Good cameras don't take good pictures; good photographers take good pictures..

But to do this successfully, you need to understand EXPOSURE. Nobody here is going to take the time to teach you everything you need to know. You will need to go get a book? Perhaps you should ask for advice about good books concerning exposure? I can't help you. I learned exposure 50 years ago before there WERE books. .

Stevehabig wrote:.

When I set the ISO, the shutter speed is automatically set when I amin aperture mode? I assume the shutter speed will be based on thetype of movement there is? The more movedment, the faster theshutter speed will be?.

Charlie DavisNikon 5700, Sony R1, Nikon D300HomePage: http://www.1derful.infoBridge Blog: http://www.here-ugo.com/BridgeBlog/..

Comment #31

$1600 to spend on a high end lens, but can't spend $15 on a "Intro to Photography" book?.

Stevehabig wrote:.

When I set the ISO, the shutter speed is automatically set when I amin aperture mode? I assume the shutter speed will be based on thetype of movement there is? The more movedment, the faster theshutter speed will be?..

Comment #32

I took basketball pictures of my daughter playing varsity b-ball all season with a Nikon d50 and 85mm1.8. I took hundreds of pictures and got a few nice ones..

Getting the exposure right will not be as difficult as focusing. Depending on the light in the gym you'll have to shoot wide open 2.8, iso 1600 and the fastest shutter speed you can manage maybe 1/320. (With the 1.8 I was able to shoot at 1/500, ISO 1600). I also set my camera to shoot in continuous burst shooting mode, auto focus set to AF-C continuous-servo Af, and AF-area mode set to either single area or dynamic..

Position yourself at the baseline, either the corners or under the basket. The best pictures should show faces, the ball and some conflict. If you have a knack for anticipating the action you should get some good shoots..

Good luck...

Comment #33

I also shoot in RAW. I used Lightroom and Nikon View NX to convert...

Comment #34

Chuxter wrote:.

Mofongo wrote:.

Chuxter wrote:.

Stevehabig wrote:I have a 70-200 lens with my D80. If I increase the ISO, does thatincrease the shutter speed?.

As others have (finally) explained, the answer is "No"..

Why would you flat out say no? Put your camera in aperture priorityor program mode. Increase your ISO. The shutter speed will increase....

Of course in shutter priority or manual mode it does not....

Yes, that's why I could not say "yes"..

I was disgusted with your answer. Other posters were helpful andanswered the OPs question poperly. I was explaining why over 50% ofthe replies were wrong..

Disgusted with my answer? Here I twice explained how when in aperture priority mode raising the ISO increases the shutter speed.http://forums.dpreview.com/...forums/read.asp?forum=1002&message=27044249http://forums.dpreview.com/...forums/read.asp?forum=1002&message=27048872.

This was helpful and answered the question properly....

Your only reply before this was to say "No it doesn't" without offering any useful info on when it does and than going off on some strange rant about posters not knowing what they are talking about....

You could have been helpful and explained like I did that if you are in aperture priority or program mode that raising the ISO does increase the shutter speed....

You are trying to argue semantics and lure people into a maze of circular logic....

Very bizarre behavior and not helpfull at all....

As an anology, consider an old "analog" radio...one with analogvolume and tuning systems. If you de-tune a station, the volume goesdown. It would however, be incorrect to contend that the tuning knobcontrols the volume..

Uhhh, OK, that is a completely off the wall analogy....

Again, when in aperture priority or program mode raising the ISO does increase the shutter speed....

Hopefully, after you and a couple others totally confused the OP with your semantics, he was able to experiment and see for himself that people are correct in saying that you can increase your shutter speed by raising the ISO....

This has been like talking to a bologna sandwich....

Bob.

Photography is more about depth of feeling than depth of fieldhttp://www.pbase.com/mofongo..

Comment #35

Fo you realize what you are asking? You are asking if you have a Audi Q6 blue and you press the acceleration pedal the speed the car will increase..

ISO is one of the three parameters that defines the exposure (a certain exposure has these three parameters). Of course they are interdependent so if you change one parameter the other will change (one or both). If you fix the aperture (let's say at f/8) and you increase the ISO from 100 to 200 the speed will increase from 1/100 s at 1/200 s for a given exposure.VictorBucuresti, Romaniahttp://s106.photobucket.com/albums/m268/victor_petcu/http://picasaweb.google.com/teodor.nitica/..

Comment #36

As an anology, consider an old "analog" radio...one with analogvolume and tuning systems. If you de-tune a station, the volume goesdown. It would however, be incorrect to contend that the tuning knobcontrols the volume..

Uhhh, OK, that is a completely off the wall analogy....

I think that is an appropriate analogy especially if you consider that ISO causes "noise" and by amplifying light. I always think of ISO as a volume control...

Comment #37

Thanks for your time and the good information. I will keep this for future reference..

By the way, you referred to the D300, but I have the D80...

Comment #38

MaryGierth wrote:.

As an anology, consider an old "analog" radio...one with analogvolume and tuning systems. If you de-tune a station, the volume goesdown. It would however, be incorrect to contend that the tuning knobcontrols the volume..

Uhhh, OK, that is a completely off the wall analogy....

Analogies are always risky. Often the audience is not mentally nimble enough to understand it. In that case, it doesn't make sense to them and they believe that the author was batty. I'm sorry that my analogy missed you....

I think that is an appropriate analogy especially if you considerthat ISO causes "noise" and by amplifying light. I always think ofISO as a volume control..

Thank you, Mary. The ISO sensitivity rating DOES refer to a volume control setting...and that's NOT an analogy. It ONLY adjusts the amplification! BUT, when you raise the gain, other things happen (like noise) and if you have selected one of the various automatic modes, the CAMERA makes adjustments to other parameters. But this DOESN'T mean that adjusting the gain ALSO adjusts the exposure time or aperture!!! It doesn't! What happens is that the CAMERA adjusts other parameters that you have allowed it to...in response to something that you have adjusted manually..

The same effect happens when you adjust the exposure time (as an example) and the camera reacts by counter-adjusting the aperture (in order to maintain a correct exposure). This does NOT signify that adjusting the exposure time ALSO adjusts the aperture..

Charlie DavisNikon 5700, Sony R1, Nikon D300HomePage: http://www.1derful.infoBridge Blog: http://www.here-ugo.com/BridgeBlog/..

Comment #39

Chuxter wrote:.

MaryGierth wrote:.

As an anology, consider an old "analog" radio...one with analogvolume and tuning systems. If you de-tune a station, the volume goesdown. It would however, be incorrect to contend that the tuning knobcontrols the volume..

Uhhh, OK, that is a completely off the wall analogy....

Analogies are always risky. Often the audience is not educated enoughto understand it. In that case, it doesn't make sense to them andthey believe that the author was batty..

I think that is an appropriate analogy especially if you considerthat ISO causes "noise" and by amplifying light. I always think ofISO as a volume control..

Thank you, Mary. The ISO sensitivity rating DOES refer to a volumecontrol setting...and that's NOT an analogy. It ONLY adjusts theamplification! BUT, when you raise the gain, other things happen(like noise) and if you have selecte one of the various automaticmodes, the CAMERA makes adjustments to other "knobs". But thisDOESN'T mean that adjusting the gain ALSO adjusts the exposure time!!!.

I understand the point you were making with respect to the volume control and tuning knobs. Very good analogy..

To me the problem stems from the form of the question the OP asked. If he had said "If I set the aperature to 2.8, will raising the ISO allow me to raise the shutter speed" the answer would be yes. But I think as is he got alot of good info..

Charlie DavisNikon 5700, Sony R1, Nikon D300HomePage: http://www.1derful.infoBridge Blog: http://www.here-ugo.com/BridgeBlog/..

Comment #40

Chuxter wrote:.

The ISO sensitivity rating DOES refer to a volumecontrol setting...and that's NOT an analogy. It ONLY adjusts theamplification!.

Charlie,.

Of course I am aware that raising the ISO adjusts the amplification or sensitivity of the sensor....

I also apologize for my earlier statement yesterday about "like talking to a bologna sandwhich". It was almost lunchtime at work and I was very hungry so food was on my mind. (no excuse, just saying).....

BUT, when you raise the gain, other things happen(like noise) and if you have selected one of the various automaticmodes, the CAMERA makes adjustments to other parameters. But thisDOESN'T mean that adjusting the gain ALSO adjusts the exposure timeor aperture!!! It doesn't! What happens is that the CAMERA adjustsother parameters that you have allowed it to...in response tosomething that you have adjusted manually..

Again, I understand what you are saying but I still think we are arguing semantics here. When in the auto modes (aperture priority and program) the end result of increasing the ISO is a faster shutter speed....correct?.

That is all I am trying to say. I am trying to keep it simple for the OP. I also see that you gave the OP some great advise earler and were very helpfull. That is what we are here for....

I hope you have no hard feelings and we can continue to post here in harmony to learn and be of help....

Peace,.

Bob.

Photography is more about depth of feeling than depth of fieldhttp://www.pbase.com/mofongo..

Comment #41

I started reading but have not completed your blog on IQ. I remember from a previous thread you mentioned that beginners (such as myself) haven't read your blog and have not commented on it. Priior to your mentioning you had a blog on IQ I thought the "Bridge Blog" link in your signature was a reference to the game of bridge. Maybe that's stupid of me but I think a more descriptive reference to your blog will get it more attention because it is certainly deserving...

Comment #42

Wanted to add something - so I don't look as stupid, I thought your blog was either about games or bridge cameras and since I didn't play bridge nor did I have a bridge cam I didn't bother to look until after you mentioned your blog covered IQ. However, after reviewing your site I found that your definition of bridge cam doesn't agree with my consumer oriented definition of bridge camera and that the content is broader than I expected. I think there would be alot of interest in your blog with the right advertising...

Comment #43

Mofongo wrote:.

Chuxter wrote:.

The ISO sensitivity rating DOES refer to a volumecontrol setting...and that's NOT an analogy. It ONLY adjusts theamplification!.

Charlie,.

Of course I am aware that raising the ISO adjusts the amplificationor sensitivity of the sensor....

Good. I couldn't tell....

I also apologize for my earlier statement yesterday about "liketalking to a bologna sandwhich". It was almost lunchtime at work andI was very hungry so food was on my mind. (no excuse, just saying).....

Accepted. It made me hungry. .

BUT, when you raise the gain, other things happen(like noise) and if you have selected one of the various automaticmodes, the CAMERA makes adjustments to other parameters. But thisDOESN'T mean that adjusting the gain ALSO adjusts the exposure timeor aperture!!! It doesn't! What happens is that the CAMERA adjustsother parameters that you have allowed it to...in response tosomething that you have adjusted manually..

Again, I understand what you are saying but I still think we arearguing semantics here. When in the auto modes (aperture priority andprogram) the end result of increasing the ISO is a faster shutterspeed....correct?.

Yes, but in a Beginners Questions Forum, I don't think we can assume that the OP understands this distinction. It's VERY important the be clear and precise..

That is all I am trying to say. I am trying to keep it simple for theOP. I also see that you gave the OP some great advise earler and werevery helpfull. That is what we are here for....

I agree. My belief is that you over-simplified your answer...to the point of being confusing..

I hope you have no hard feelings and we can continue to post here inharmony to learn and be of help....

Absolutely. .

Charlie DavisNikon 5700, Sony R1, Nikon D300HomePage: http://www.1derful.infoBridge Blog: http://www.here-ugo.com/BridgeBlog/..

Comment #44

I'm not a good advertising guy, so I apologize for the lack..

Adjectives like "bridge" are broad and refer to many things. I guess it's my fault for making the name so simple? Another frequent poster here on dpr has a site named "Back to the Bridge". Taken out of context, either of them could be totally confusing! Perhaps I will rename mine to "Bridge Camera Blog"?.

After I created it, I found the need to EXPLAIN the complex subject of how and why digital camera IQ is achieved, since one of the BIG issues associated with "bridge" cameras is that it's easier & cheaper to achieve it. Thus, my article on "IQ: The 3 Things". Still later, I embarked on a design project for an EVIL camera and created another article. I think they are related..

Also, MY definition of a "bridge camera" does not agree with some other people. I define it as a hybrid that has significant features of the "other" type camera. At the moment, there seem to be only two flavors of "bridge camera":.

1) A non-mirror-camera with a big sensor.2) A mirror-camera with Live View..

There are other ways to "bridge" the gap between the two types. For example, a NMC with a removable lens..

I hope you DO continue exploring my "Bridge Blog"....

I have been working on a major update of the EVIL Camera Project, but keep getting distracted... .

Charlie DavisNikon 5700, Sony R1, Nikon D300HomePage: http://www.1derful.infoBridge Blog: http://www.here-ugo.com/BridgeBlog/..

Comment #45

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This question was taken from a support group/message board and re-posted here so others can learn from it.

 

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