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Is dust getting inside the lens and or camera inevitable?
Is it inevitable that even with being extremely careful changing lens in "clean" condition that a speck of dust will eventually get into the sensor and or the back of the lens? I mean, short of changing lens at an environment where there is a complete control on dust like a laboratory, dust will get in right? If it's not inevitable, I would love to know how you guys prevent dust from getting into your camera when you're changing them outside or inside...

Comments (12)

You cannot stop it entirely, but the more effort you make towards not changing lenses in environments subject to airborne dust and dirt, the fewer times you will need to clean the sensor. Anyway it is easy to clean the sensor with either a blower or a damp swab system; some of us might have no trouble with 'dust' for a whole year - a non issue..

John.Please visit me at:http://www.pbase.com/johnfr/backtothebridgehttp://www.pbase.com/johnfr/digital_dartmoor..

Comment #1

John farrar wrote:.

You cannot stop it entirely, but the more effort you make towards notchanging lenses in environments subject to airborne dust and dirt,the fewer times you will need to clean the sensor. Anyway it is easyto clean the sensor with either a blower or a damp swab system; someof us might have no trouble with 'dust' for a whole year - a nonissue..

John.Please visit me at:http://www.pbase.com/johnfr/backtothebridgehttp://www.pbase.com/johnfr/digital_dartmoor.

What about the back of the lense? My cousin's friend's 85mm f/1.8 lense have more than a few specks of dust in it, but I'm not sure how he would clean it...

Comment #2

If you mean in (inside) the lens then it is an expensive dismantling job best done by a lab. If on the rear element outside, a simple puff with an air blower will often dislodge it. If not then breathe on it and then gently use a CLEAN lens cloth.John.Please visit me at:http://www.pbase.com/johnfr/backtothebridgehttp://www.pbase.com/johnfr/digital_dartmoor..

Comment #3

Clean dust on the lines (not inside the lens) with a giottos rocket blower and/or a lenspen..

Dust on the sensor is inevitable. But it is also not a problem to clean the sensor. It is almost impossible to prevent some dust from getting inside the camera. That zoom lens you have acts like a bellows breathing air in and out as you zoom, so even not ever changing your lens is not an answer to the dust problem..

The greatest of mankind's criminals are those who delude themselves into thinking they have done 'the right thing.'- Rayna Butler..

Comment #4

I notice that dust tends to collect on collar right where the lens and body mate. Then when changing lenses it is inevitable that some of that dust will find it's way into the mirror box an onto the sensor..

Before changing lenses, I take a brush and wipe away the outside area of the body, as well as the back of the new lens while it's rear lens cap is still attached.Warm regards,DOF..

Comment #5

It is also a good idea to turn the body off and point the lens mount on the camera facing down when switching lenses..

Dust has a tendancy to fall..

J. D.Colorful Colorado.

Remember.always keep your receipt, the box, and everything that came in it!..

Comment #6

MusicDoctorDJ wrote:.

Dust has a tendancy to fall..

Not to nit-pik, but it has been my experience that dust tends to ride-along with air currents. It could be a HVAC system, someone walking by, a gentle breeze, etc..

In any case, I hold my camera horizontally since it is easier to mount/dismount a lens..

Comment #7

Sgt_Strider wrote:.

Is it inevitable that even with being extremely careful changing lensin "clean" condition that a speck of dust will eventually get intothe sensor and or the back of the lens?.

Yes..

I mean, short of changinglens at an environment where there is a complete control on dust likea laboratory, dust will get in right?.

If you take the camera out of the laboratory, dust will eventually get in. 10000% guaranteed if you have a zoom lens or a lens that moves when focusing. You'll get dust IN the lens sooner or later..

By the way, there IS dirt in a brand new camera that never left the clean room..

If it's not inevitable, I wouldlove to know how you guys prevent dust from getting into your camerawhen you're changing them outside or inside..

Well, normal precautions. If you change the lens in a dust storm, it might be a good ideea to try and protect the lens and the body with a coat or something. However, no worries. It's easy to clean...

Comment #8

Dad_of_four wrote:.

MusicDoctorDJ wrote:.

Dust has a tendancy to fall..

Not to nit-pik, but it has been my experience that dust tends toride-along with air currents. It could be a HVAC system, someonewalking by, a gentle breeze, etc..

Not to nit-pick, but if you think dust doesn't settle then I guess mum_of_four must do all the housework..

But it doesn't settle in the few seconds it takes to change a lens so you're right really .

In any case, I hold my camera horizontally since it is easier tomount/dismount a lens.

Me too...

Comment #9

Dust is inevitable. My 70-300mm is like a bicycle pump - when you zoom it sucks in air & when you unzoom it blows it all back out again. AFAIK it doesnt have an air filter ;(..

Comment #10

Devnull wrote:.

Sgt_Strider wrote:.

Is it inevitable that even with being extremely careful changing lensin "clean" condition that a speck of dust will eventually get intothe sensor and or the back of the lens?.

Yes..

I mean, short of changinglens at an environment where there is a complete control on dust likea laboratory, dust will get in right?.

If you take the camera out of the laboratory, dust will eventuallyget in. 10000% guaranteed if you have a zoom lens or a lens thatmoves when focusing. You'll get dust IN the lens sooner or later..

By the way, there IS dirt in a brand new camera that never left theclean room..

If it's not inevitable, I wouldlove to know how you guys prevent dust from getting into your camerawhen you're changing them outside or inside..

Well, normal precautions. If you change the lens in a dust storm, itmight be a good ideea to try and protect the lens and the body with acoat or something. However, no worries. It's easy to clean..

What about weather sealed zooms though? Someone said that dust cannot go in unless you take off the lens and dust enters from the rear element...

Comment #11

I think it is unavoidable, lenses act like an air pump..

And as for changing lenses, It may be safest to change them under water.

Rgds..

Comment #12

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