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Hyperfocal Tutorial
Good evening!.

I've been meaning to get this done for some time now, and I finally have it completed - a tutorial on hyperfocal photography..

Http://mgreerphoto.blogspot.com/2007/10/hyperfocal-distance.html.

I hope it is of some help to people here. I remember the first time I heard the phrase and thought it meant learning how to focus quickly..

Learning this technique has certainly helped my photography..

Please feel free to share comments, suggestions or corrections..

Thanks.MattImages:http://www.picasaweb.google.com/mgreerphotoPhotoshop Tutorials:http://www.mgreerphoto.blogspot.com..

Comments (6)

Visited your site. You have some nice tutorials there, which cover the basics well. And you are good photographer too..

Mgreer wrote:.

Good evening!.

I've been meaning to get this done for some time now, and I finallyhave it completed - a tutorial on hyperfocal photography..

Http://mgreerphoto.blogspot.com/2007/10/hyperfocal-distance.html.

I hope it is of some help to people here. I remember the first timeI heard the phrase and thought it meant learning how to focus quickly..

Learning this technique has certainly helped my photography..

Please feel free to share comments, suggestions or corrections..

Thanks.MattImages:http://www.picasaweb.google.com/mgreerphotoPhotoshop Tutorials:http://www.mgreerphoto.blogspot.com.

Best Wishes, Ajayhttp://picasaweb.google.com/ajay0612..

Comment #1

There are significant misunderstandings in the tutorial. See my comments in "Open Talk" above.Leonhttp://homepage.mac.com/leonwittwer/landscapes.htm..

Comment #2

I appreciate your comments..

For those interested in the discussion, it is here:http://forums.dpreview.com/...forums/read.asp?forum=1018&message=25413303.

I don't mean to put words into Leon's mouth, but I believe the main issue he had was my claim that DOF ranges 1/3 in front of the focus point, and 2/3 behind..

There is considerable literature that supports my claim, as well as lens focus scales, and my shooting experience..

If anybody else has any input on this, I'd love to hear it..

Thanks.MattImages:http://www.picasaweb.google.com/mgreerphotoPhotoshop Tutorials:http://www.mgreerphoto.blogspot.com..

Comment #3

Mgreer wrote:.

I appreciate your comments..

For those interested in the discussion, it is here:http://forums.dpreview.com/...forums/read.asp?forum=1018&message=25413303.

I don't mean to put words into Leon's mouth, but I believe the mainissue he had was my claim that DOF ranges 1/3 in front of the focuspoint, and 2/3 behind..

It's mainly a matter of perception. There's nothing in optics to support the notion that a lens is going to resolve out of focus detail ahead of the focal point better than areas behind that point. But hyperfocality is a game of aproximation and as viewers of images, we're usually going to be less accepting of a lack of foreground detail, where fine detail will be the most evident than in the distance which is why hyperfocal forumulas typically favor a little additional front focus, albeit at some expense of background detail, at least as compared to infinity focusing..

Each subject will have it's own requirements and while hyperfocality can often be a useful tool, the calculators and formulas are best used as a general guidepoints rather than laws, especially when applied to the higher resolutions afforded by modern optics, sensors and films..

One good alternative point of view that might help put that 1/3 - 2/3 rule into better perspective can be found here.....

Http://www.trenholm.org/hmmerk/DOFR.html.

You've done a nice job incorporating this tutorial into your blog pages. I hope that you aren't taking any criticisms that have been brought forward in a negative way. Taken into careful consideration, many of the points that have been brought up could be used to help dispel some of the myths and just plain outdated information that permeate not only the web but standard photography texts as well. It's a subject that is much like a religion to many and like any religion, it has it's share of both zealots and heathens among it's ranks. As always, the truth lies somewhere in the middle..

'Here, look at the monkey. Look at the silly monkey!'.

Tom Younghttp://www.pbase.com/tyoung/..

Comment #4

The equation for the ratio of the front DoF to the rear DoF is.

Front/Rear = [1+(D/H)]/[1-(D/H)].

Where D is the focus distance and H is the hyperfocal distance. As D becomes rather less than H, the ratio approaches one. This situation is common for macro shooters, wildlife shooters, sports shooters, etc. Shooting that involves longer lenses more often than not has nearly symmetric DoF about the focus distance..

If D approaches H, the Front/Rear ratio approaches infinity. This is the "typical" hyperfocal focussing often discussed in the literature. The "infinite" comes from the rear boundary of the DoF becoming very large. Landscape shooting often involves large rear DoF compared to the front DoF..

The "one third" rule is ok for a type of shooting but not for all. There should have been some caveats in the tutorial that let readers know where the rule applies and where is does not.Leonhttp://homepage.mac.com/leonwittwer/landscapes.htm..

Comment #5

Corrections below. Sorry for the confusion. What a difference a sign can make..

Leon Wittwer wrote:.

The equation for the ratio of the front DoF to the rear DoF is.

Front/Rear = [1-(D/H)]/[1+(D/H)].

Where D is the focus distance and H is the hyperfocal distance. As Dbecomes rather less than H, the ratio approaches one. This situationis common for macro shooters, wildlife shooters, sports shooters,etc. Shooting that involves longer lenses more often than not hasnearly symmetric DoF about the focus distance.If D approaches H, the Front/Rear ratio approaches zero. This isthe "typical" hyperfocal focussing often discussed in the literature.The "zero" comes from the rear boundary of the DoF becoming verylarge. Landscape shooting often involves large rear DoF compared tothe front DoF.The "one third" rule is ok for a type of shooting but not for all.There should have been some caveats in the tutorial that let readersknow where the rule applies and where is does not.Leonhttp://homepage.mac.com/leonwittwer/landscapes.htm.

Leonhttp://homepage.mac.com/leonwittwer/landscapes.htm..

Comment #6

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This question was taken from a support group/message board and re-posted here so others can learn from it.

 

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