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How do I improve my photography?
I have a canon EOS 400D digital, which is my pride and joy. I take it everywhere, photo everything and generally my composition is good, (if I may say so myself). I've even had the odd photo accepted in photo libraries. I've had my camera a year and I'm a self taught photographer, who probably has learnt quite a bit. I work in raw format and use the TV, AV, M, and A-Dep modes and manipulate in Photoshop when I need to..

My biggest problem is my photos, more times than not, are rejected due to focusing on the wrong point, not enough depth of field, or too much noise etc etc..

Basically, I'm saying I'm a frustrated amateur photographer with an obvious need to improve..

Can anyone help and point me in the right direction of some books which will give me exercises to try out, explain lenses, ISOs, settings on the camera and when to use them. Alternatively, recommend a photography courses in London UK, (South if poss), where you thought you got something from the session..

Many thanks in advance...

Comments (31)

Have a look at http://www.usa.canon.com/dlc/controller?act=TipsAndTechsAct The Canon EOS site has lots of useful info for beginners..

Also, go through this course, it's good: http://web.canon.jp/imaging/enjoydslr/index.html.

Read your manual that came with the camera. I don't think that you need to go to a course. It took me a while to learn, but it's quite simple, the best way is to get your manual and try out the features as you read it..

For ISO, lower ISO = less noise. Ideally, in sunny weather you should use ISO 100, in darker situations ISO 400 up to ISO 800. ISO 1600 might be too noisy. A friend of mine purchased an EOS 400D as a first camera and shot everything in Auto, it was terrible, camera automatically selected ISO 1600 in conditions where ISO 100 would have been enough..

Aperture = the opening of the lens. Search around on google and you'll find lots of info about it. The smaller the aperture (f), the larger the opening = more light can come in = shorter exposure time. A small f also has a depth of field, so it's important to focus correctly. There are lots of things to write about, eg, if taking a portrait, sometimes, you might focus the eyes, but the nose is blurry due to depth of field, so you need to ease of on DOF. If you are taking a photo of something moving fast, you need as short exposure as possible, so you'll use as low f as you can..

Lastly, the best way to improve your photography is to take lots of photos, you'll improve with time...

Comment #1

Macsimum wrote:.

My biggest problem is my photos, more times than not, are rejecteddue to focusing on the wrong point, not enough depth of field, or toomuch noise etc etc..

Well, focusing is a basic requirement. You achieve focus or not. Depth of field - it's pretty much user controlable. Noise - is ISO dependant and camera dependant..

With a modern camera you it's pretty difficult to get bad results. I'd guess that you missed the basics..

Basically, I'm saying I'm a frustrated amateur photographer with anobvious need to improve..

LEARN the basics. Start with the camera manual. That should fix the missed focus. Learn about exposure. That will probably solve the noise problem. You should have a DOF preview button on the camera.



Can anyone help and point me in the right direction of some bookswhich will give me exercises to try out, explain lenses, ISOs,settings on the camera and when to use them..

For the technicals, start with the fine manual..

For the "exercise" part, first educate your eye. Look at photographs. Start with some albums, then look on the net. Try and judge other's photos, it's easier than judging your own work. When you feel more secure, examine your older work - the fresher a photograph is, the harder is for the author to evaluate it..

Imposed work. On this site there are weekly challenges, on an imposed theme. Join. Design your own themes. Wide angle. Lines.

Colors. There is no limit..

After an year of extensive usage of the camera you should be able to control it good. No focus/DOF/exposure problems. Since you don't, my guess is you skipped the basics. Go back there..

/d/n..

Comment #2

I guess you are both right. I'm going back to basics..

Thanks for the tips..

J..

Comment #3

... is to make sure that your photo tells the story..

This is actually more important than anything else. Emphasize the true point of interest: a person's beautiful eyes for instance, in a landscape go for the sense of awe, tranquillity, balance etc. ie. the special quality that makes it attractive to you and find a suitable secondary subject whenever you can as well..

Next get the technical aspects spot-on so that they doubly emphasise the point you're trying to make: separation of subject from background, perspective control, sense of tension (where appropriate) etc..

Then ensure that the camera settings are optimised for the kind of shot you're aiming to create. Take the shot... then take more cropped in ever more tightly..

Chances are it will now begin to work..

John.Please visit me at:http://www.pbase.com/johnfr/backtothebridgehttp://www.pbase.com/johnfr/digital_dartmoor..

Comment #4

If you want to learn and are cheap, then hit your library and read most of the books they have, don't worry if the older ones are film based, it really doesn't matter..

Then take out all the past issues of photo mags they have and read them. Go back a year latter and re-read some of the books and mags..

Probably the biggest bang for the buck is the "camera club." Often these clubs put on very interesting courses, on the cheap or free for it's members. The image critiques are priceless and will move you along quite quickly. Good clubs long ago learned to be gentle in these critiques so don't be afraid to display your work; just remember you are entering your work for critique - not praise - which is usually the closet agenda of many here who submit work for "critique.".

Here is an agenda page from a local camera club in my area:.

Http://www.nsps.ca/meetings.html.

Here is the home page for the camera club:.

Http://www.nsps.ca/.

Rationally I have no hope, irrationally I believe in miracles.Joni Mitchell..

Comment #5

If you're running into complaints about DOF and ISO noise, you probably need to learn lighting..

I'd start by getting a cheap silver reflector and learning to fill shadows with it if you do portraiture, then learn to use off-camera flash (check outhttp://www.strobist.com for tutorials, look at portfolios for mine for examples, etc)..

-Matthttp://exnophoto.com.

The blog: http://Exno.Blogspot.com..

Comment #6

Matt,.

I think you could be right. I tend to take pictures mainly of my kids who just don't keep still for 2 seconds, and so make it nearly impossible for me to get the focus, DOF or lighting right. Most of my photos are taken inside, so I definitely think I need to invest in a reflector. Why do you suggest a silver reflector? What's the difference between this and the others? I think I also need to get myself a flash too..

I recently bought myself a sigma 24-70mm lens to help with indoor shots. Not sure it was the right move or not?.

RegardsJune.

Ps. I really liked your web site and images. Very inspiring...

Comment #7

That you may find useful, I know I did.

Http://luminous-landscape.com/columns/aesthetics-1.shtmlhttp://www.luminous-landscape.com/columns/composition-2.shtmlhttp://www.luminous-landscape.com/columns/composition-3.shtmlhttp://www.luminous-landscape.com/columns/composition-4.shtmlhttp://www.luminous-landscape.com/columns/aesthetics5.shtmlhttp://www.luminous-landscape.com/columns/determining-exposure.shtmlhttp://www.luminous-landscape.com/columns/keepers.shtmlhttp://www.luminous-landscape.com/columns/portfolio-8.shtmlhttp://www.luminous-landscape.com/columns/aesthetics9.shtmlhttp://www.luminous-landscape.com/columns/aesthetics10.shtmlhttp://www.luminous-landscape.com/tutorials/expose-right.shtml.

A lot of reading but I think you will find it all very useful..

Jameshttp://www.pbase.com/carrhighlander..

Comment #8

Whay is it that we always seem to get the important informtion well after people have worked hard to privide answers to the wrong questions?.

Have you EVER seen sharp, noise free, deep depth of field, well lit, non-flash photographs of moving children indoors in poorly rooms?.

You're compaining about not being able to take pictures that are impossible to take in the first place..

Photography is a set of trade-offs. High ISO ov ercomes (to some extent) poor light, but adds noise. Faster shutter speeds overcome motion blur but force wide aperetures, which means shallow depth of field. And so on..

Working fast means you neglect to work carefully. You don't need a course to tell you to slow down..

THREE LESSONS:.

1/ get a tripod. Put the camera on it, so that you can easily set all the knobs and buttons and easily read the screens to see that the settings are what you want..

2/ learn to see the light. This just takes the payng of attention, squinting, and making a little tunnel with your fingers..

For instance, look at a chair, and a pillow on it, that are near a window on a sunny day. (Doesn't relly matter if the sun is coming trhough the window; it hjust needs to be bright outside..

See how new side of the chair (facing the window) is brighter than the side away from the window. Make a tunnel with your fingers, and look at the darker side. Note how it seems lighter and more detailed now that you can't see the bright side. (that's because you eye is openingup, just like a wider aperture in a camera) Imagine you are a light meter. How would you set the camera in order to get good exposure under these circumstances?.

So your job as a learning photogrpaher is to figure out how to solve this problem..

Which leads us to point three, already advocated by an earlier poster..

3/ Get a reflector. Still using the chair set-up, just get something white and flat (a towwel placed over a baking sheet works) and hold it toward the dark side of the chair ahd pillow. Notice how the dark side gets lighter..

You can employ this principle for lots of different types of pictures..

Once you see what happens by using some household objects, go to a store and buy a better reflector. Several brands are circular, and twist in a weird way so thay are a lot smaller for storage than they are when untwisted and in use..

Silver or white? Try some aluminum foil on that baking sheet, and see what the difference is. My reflector has a white side and a silver side).

Books? Go to a big store and look for John Hedgecoe books and pick one that appeals. He's got lots to choose from, with varying eamounts of attention on technology, techniques and composition, and he writes in the Queen's English..

Tom Ang has several good books, too, written in colonial English..

BAK..

Comment #9

I know you shoot Canon, but I suggest you take some seminars or courses from Nikon School. It's the best money I've ever spent. I took my first one in the early 70s and continue to take them every now and then..

It doesn't matter what brand of camera you use. It a fantastic resource and a lot of fun. You can take the same Nikon School course over again and still have fun and learn more. The instructors change and the multimedia presentations change and get better each time..

Http://www.nikon.co.uk/training/..

Comment #10

Macsimum wrote:.

I have a canon EOS 400D digital, which is my pride and joy. I take iteverywhere, photo everything and generally my composition is good,(if I may say so myself). I've even had the odd photo accepted inphoto libraries. I've had my camera a year and I'm a self taughtphotographer, who probably has learnt quite a bit. I work in rawformat and use the TV, AV, M, and A-Dep modes and manipulate inPhotoshop when I need to..

I'm actually pretty similar to you. Same camera, self taught, almost the same time having it. I know about the technical side of photograhpy, I don't think my composition is that good though. I'm not very creative..

My biggest problem is my photos, more times than not, are rejecteddue to focusing on the wrong point, not enough depth of field, or toomuch noise etc etc.Basically, I'm saying I'm a frustrated amateur photographer with anobvious need to improve..

Auto-focus should nail it, unless you're tricking it and it has to hunt..

Can anyone help and point me in the right direction of some bookswhich will give me exercises to try out, explain lenses, ISOs,settings on the camera and when to use them. Alternatively, recommenda photography courses in London UK, (South if poss), where youthought you got something from the session..

This is very short, but I feel like posting it.

With exposure, you can do a lot of experiments on your own. Head over to M mode and try out individual settings, and taking a picture after each one, like 1/100 F5.6, ISO400 / 1/100 F6.3, ISO400 / 1/100 F7.1, ISO400 / you get the point. Keep two of the variables the same and change one thing. If you want to see the exposure not change so drastically, try exposure compensation instead in Av/Tv modes. Since these are pictures to only look at, you can delete them if you want..

ISO - the higher you go, the more noise you get, but you can shoot faster or use smaller apertures. There's no "good" ISO, but as a rule, keep it as low as possible. Possible is whatever exposure is okay until the image becomes blurred from camera shake...

Comment #11

I meant to advise a reflector for outdoor work... can't give you many tips on indoor shooting as I don't do it very often, but for starters learning how to use a bounce flash is good..

Silver? Just because silver gives nice, clean, white reflections..

Thanks - glad you liked my portfolio!.

Http://exnophoto.com.

The blog: http://Exno.Blogspot.com..

Comment #12

ExNihilo wrote:.

I meant to advise a reflector for outdoor work... can't give you manytips on indoor shooting as I don't do it very often, but for starterslearning how to use a bounce flash is good..

Silver? Just because silver gives nice, clean, white reflections..

Thanks - glad you liked my portfolio!.

A silver reflector will give the most intense reflection for more light, but the light won't be as even as using a more diffused reflector..

With kids runnig around, positioning any reflector will probably be next to impossible..

Cheers from John from Adelaide, South AustraliaJohn Harvey Photography http://johnharvey.com.auCanon 40D, Canon 20D & Fuji F10..

Comment #13

Macsimum wrote:.

I have a canon EOS 400D digital, which is my pride and joy. I take iteverywhere, photo everything and generally my composition is good,(if I may say so myself). I've even had the odd photo accepted inphoto libraries. I've had my camera a year and I'm a self taughtphotographer, who probably has learnt quite a bit. I work in rawformat and use the TV, AV, M, and A-Dep modes and manipulate inPhotoshop when I need to..

My biggest problem is my photos, more times than not, are rejecteddue to focusing on the wrong point, not enough depth of field, or toomuch noise etc etc.Basically, I'm saying I'm a frustrated amateur photographer with anobvious need to improve..

Can anyone help and point me in the right direction of some bookswhich will give me exercises to try out, explain lenses, ISOs,settings on the camera and when to use them. Alternatively, recommenda photography courses in London UK, (South if poss), where youthought you got something from the session..

Many thanks in advance..

Hi June. As you've said elsewhere, you want to photograph your kids inside (low light) and they won't stay still. That's a real challenge..

You might choose to prefocus, ie focus at a particular distance and then try to photograph your moving kids when they happen to be at that distance, eg as they run into that 'focus zone'..

Another kety consideration is achieving a fast enough shuuter speed (short enough exposure period) to freeze the action enough. You need a combination of enough light, a fast enough lens and the right settings on your camera. To achieve a higher shutter speed for a given amount of light, you need a small enough f-stop and a high enough ISO. A faster lens (smaller possible f-stop number) can help, even if the depth of field ends up being small. You also need to consider how much noise is acceptable as you increase the ISO speed..

For any given lens, if the exposure time is too long to freeze the action enough even at the smallest f-stop number available for that lens (at the focal length you wnat to use) and at an ISO value that gives you acceptable noise, then you need either more light or a faster lens (or a better camera)..

More light might mean shooting closer to a window, choosing a brighter day, using flash, etc. If you prefocus on a particular area, you might be able to use a reflector as someone else suggested to try to reflect some light back to light up your kids more as they move through your target zone. other than that, using reflectors is probably next to impossible for moving subjects..

Cheers from John from Adelaide, South AustraliaJohn Harvey Photography http://johnharvey.com.auCanon 40D, Canon 20D & Fuji F10..

Comment #14

Hi June. As you've said elsewhere, you want to photograph your kidsinside (low light) and they won't stay still. That's a realchallenge..

You might choose to prefocus, ie focus at a particular distance andthen try to photograph your moving kids when they happen to be atthat distance, eg as they run into that 'focus zone'..

Another kety consideration is achieving a fast enough shuuter speed(short enough exposure period) to freeze the action enough. You needa combination of enough light, a fast enough lens and the rightsettings on your camera. To achieve a higher shutter speed for agiven amount of light, you need a small enough f-stop and a highenough ISO. A faster lens (smaller possible f-stop number) can help,even if the depth of field ends up being small. You also need toconsider how much noise is acceptable as you increase the ISO speed..

For any given lens, if the exposure time is too long to freeze theaction enough even at the smallest f-stop number available for thatlens (at the focal length you wnat to use) and at an ISO value thatgives you acceptable noise, then you need either more light or afaster lens (or a better camera)..

More light might mean shooting closer to a window, choosing abrighter day, using flash, etc. If you prefocus on a particulararea, you might be able to use a reflector as someone else suggestedto try to reflect some light back to light up your kids more as theymove through your target zone. other than that, using reflectors isprobably next to impossible for moving subjects..

John,.

Thank you for this. I have found this very useful. You suggest a faster lens. Any suggestions?.

RegardsJune..

Comment #15

- Add a flash for fast moving kids inside. Or,- Get a 50 f1.8, best bang for the buck, Or.

- Canon 5D + fast, fast lens (35 f1.4L, 16-35 f2.8L, 50 f1.2), then you can shoot iso 1600 with fast shutter speed..

I am aiming for the last option, one day... Johnnyhttp://tuxbailey.zenfolio.com..

Comment #16

Don't shy away from longer lenses either - the 85mm f1.8 is pretty sweet focal length and ap.http://exnophoto.com.

The blog: http://Exno.Blogspot.com..

Comment #17

Macsimum wrote:.

Thank you for this. I have found this very useful. You suggest afaster lens. Any suggestions?.

RegardsJune.

Hi June. You were thinking in the right direction with the Simga 24-70/2.8 as f/2.8 is fairly fast, but low light is low light..

As someone else suggested, the best bang for buck is the Canon 50/1.8. the 50/1.4 is better build and image quality (at wider apertures like f/1.8) and still not exceedingly expensive. As someone else suggested, the 85/1.8 is also worth considering. f/2 would be a whole stop faster than f/2.8, and anything less is even faster, so you could at least halve the exposure time with one of those fast primes, all else being equal. Primes aren't as flexible as zooms (obviously primes don't zoom), but there aren't any zooms for Canon faster than f/2.8..

Flash is problematic. I enjoy flash, but I have plenty more to learn. It can add plenty of light, but can also look terrible, like the deer in the headlights look. It can also be a cost-effective solution for lighting. Lighting is one of the most tricky, and rewarding, challenges in photography..

Cheers from John from Adelaide, South AustraliaJohn Harvey Photography http://johnharvey.com.auCanon 40D, Canon 20D & Fuji F10..

Comment #18

Don't shy away from longer lenses either - the 85mm f1.8 is prettysweet focal length and ap..

What's the difference between the 50 and the 85.Or should I ask, what are the pros and cons?..

Comment #19

The 85mm is just longer - there's less background showed from the same distance as a 50mm. This also makes the bokeh look a bit better..

Http://exnophoto.com.

The blog: http://Exno.Blogspot.com..

Comment #20

As someone else suggested, the best bang for buck is the Canon50/1.8. the 50/1.4 is better build and image quality (at widerapertures like f/1.8) and still not exceedingly expensive. Assomeone else suggested, the 85/1.8 is also worth considering. f/2would be a whole stop faster than f/2.8, and anything less is evenfaster, so you could at least halve the exposure time with one ofthose fast primes, all else being equal. Primes aren't as flexibleas zooms (obviously primes don't zoom), but there aren't any zoomsfor Canon faster than f/2.8..

OK..

I feel like I'm learning something and I've bought my reflector, (which is silver. Very impressed. Can't wait to try it on kids this weekend). Now looking at lenses and found the following:Canon FD SSC 50/1.4 Normal Lens 50mm f/1.4Would this suit?Silly question I know, but do all canon lenses fit all canon models?.

J..

Comment #21

Macsimum wrote:.

As someone else suggested, the best bang for buck is the Canon50/1.8. the 50/1.4 is better build and image quality (at widerapertures like f/1.8) and still not exceedingly expensive. Assomeone else suggested, the 85/1.8 is also worth considering. f/2would be a whole stop faster than f/2.8, and anything less is evenfaster, so you could at least halve the exposure time with one ofthose fast primes, all else being equal. Primes aren't as flexibleas zooms (obviously primes don't zoom), but there aren't any zoomsfor Canon faster than f/2.8..

OK.I feel like I'm learning something and I've bought my reflector,(which is silver. Very impressed. Can't wait to try it on kids thisweekend). Now looking at lenses and found the following:Canon FD SSC 50/1.4 Normal Lens 50mm f/1.4Would this suit?Silly question I know, but do all canon lenses fit all canon models?.

Hi June. Always best to ask if you're not sure..

You will need an EF lens (or EF-S) for your Canon DSLR to make sure it will fit and you get all functions like metering and AF. For the suggested lenses, I should have said EF 50/1.8 (cheapest), EF 50/1.4 (more $, but still reasonable price) or EF 50/1.8 (more $ again, but still good value for money)..

Good luck and I hope you enjoy playing around. If you get the urge, I would strongly recommend you get a decent flashgun. The 430EX isn't bad, but the 580EX II is way better, giving you more power if you need it and 1/3 stop output power increments, among other things. Learning how to bounce the flash to blend the light with what's already available can result in pretty good results, even with only one flashgun. If you end up getting a flashgun, I'd recommend you get low discharge rechargeable NiMH AA batteries as others that aren't low discharge can tend to drain too quickly for my liking in between usage, so you have to keep recharging them, which is a pain (for me at least, but then again I have several flashguns and lots of batteries)..

Cheers from John from Adelaide, South AustraliaJohn Harvey Photography http://johnharvey.com.auCanon 40D, Canon 20D & Fuji F10..

Comment #22

ExNihilo wrote:.

The 85mm is just longer - there's less background showed from thesame distance as a 50mm. This also makes the bokeh look a bit better..

That's a start, but doesn't really cover pros and cons..

The lenses are here..

Http://www.usa.canon.com/...roller?act=ProductCatIndexAct&fcategoryid=152.

50 is smaller and lighter and costs less than the 85/1.8, whether 50/1.4 or 50/1.8 II version..

50/1.8 II is very cheap, but is also cheap build quality and lacks USM (fast and quiet AF)..

50/1.4 costs more, but is much better build, has USM for better AF speed and provides better bokeh than 50/1.8, but the bokeh may not matter to you.50 gives you a wider field of view than 85, so you can capture more from closer..

50/1.4 at f/1.4 is obviously faster than 85/1.8 at f/1.8, so you can get shorter exposures for the same conditions and other settings to freeze the action better with the 50/1.5 wide open, even if the 50/1.4 is often a bit soft at f/1.4..

Being shorter, the 50 is less prone to camera shake for the same exposure times as the 85..

If you get a flashgun that supports ETTL II, I don't know whether the 50/1.4 (and 50/1.8) support ETTL II. That's probably less important to you than other considerations..

85/1.8 is a bit bigger and heavier and costs more..

85 is better quality than both 50s, especially 50/1.8, better optics and has USM for fast AF..

85 gives you a narrower field of view, so you may need to back up (if you can), but it also gets you in closer from further away..

At the same f-stop, you need a shorter exposure than with a 50 to keep camera shake under control. Not an issue in good light, but can be in low light..

F/1.8 is not as fast as f/1.4 (with the 50/1.4), but the 85/1.8 is sharper at f/1.8 than the 50/1.4 is at f/1.4, and probably not so different from the 50/1.4 at f/1.8 (although I don't know for sure). 85/1.8 at f/1.8 is sharper than 50/1.8 at f/1.8..

If you get a flashgun that supports ETTL II, I don't know whether the 85/1.8 (and 50/1.8) supports ETTL II. That's probably less important to you than other considerations..

Overall, I think the 50/1.4 is more versatile than the 85/1.8 for normal closer shooting and it costs less too. From further away, the 85/1.8 might make more sense. If you only get one, I'd recommend the 50/1.4 to start with. You can probably find one used for a better price and you can always sell it again if you decide you prefer something different..

Cheers from John from Adelaide, South AustraliaJohn Harvey Photography http://johnharvey.com.auCanon 40D, Canon 20D & Fuji F10..

Comment #23

Thank you all for your help..

I have bought myself a Canon 50mm f/1.4 lens.Can't wait for it to arrive and try it out. I'll let you know how I get on..

I also bought a silver reflector. Played with it using my 24-70 lens, which I have to say looked awful. Still lots of noise/out of focus etc, but I'm hoping this will change when I get the new lens..

Next, I need to save the pennies and buy that flash, as I think this will make the biggest difference.Ho, hum, it's all a bottomless pit..

Macsimum..

Comment #24

To all of you who responded I want to say a big thank you..

I took all your advice on board, I've read the manual  slowly. I bought a 50mm lens with a f1.4 and a reflector. I then went on holiday and shot hundreds of pictures. What a difference, my pictures are sharp or at least most of them..

A real sense of achievement and feel good factor that the items I've bought are not a waste of money..

RegardsJ..

Comment #25

Http://www.friedmanarchives.com/rebels/index.htm.

Go pick up Gary's book on the Xti (400D)What the instruction should've been..

Dave PattersonMidwestshutterbug.com'When the light and composition are strong, nobodynotices things like resolution or pincushion distortion'Gary Friedman..

Comment #26

I was in your shoe last summer. This winter, I went and bought some good books where I really learned how to get a proper exposure and other techniques. Then it is to put in practice all this knowledge..

Here are some excellent books:.

Byan Peterson, Understanding exposure (This is a must-have-book).

Bryan Peterson, Understanding shutter speed.

Rick Sammons, Travel and nature photography.

RM..

Comment #27

My favorite books of classic Nature photography with excellent examples and tech info how(why) each photo was made:.

1. "Nature Photography Field Guide" by John Shaw..

2. "Understanding Exposure: How to Shoot Great Photographs with a Film or Digital Camera " Bryan Peterson.

Http://www.stan-pustylnik.smugmug.com..

Comment #28

Macsimum wrote:.

To all of you who responded I want to say a big thank you..

I took all your advice on board, I've read the manual  slowly. Ibought a 50mm lens with a f1.4 and a reflector. I then went onholiday and shot hundreds of pictures. What a difference, my picturesare sharp or at least most of them..

A real sense of achievement and feel good factor that the items I'vebought are not a waste of money..

RegardsJ.

Thanks for the feedback J. It's great to see you were willing and able to apply advice from this thread to help you to produce pleasing results. There's always something mroe to learn and try out..

Any chance of showing us any samples of what you can now achieve, perhaps even comparing with what you could do beforehand? In case you don't know how, post the images in a web gallery that allows public viewing and post the URL in a DPR post..

If you want to display an image in the DPR post, the image needs to be posted in a gallery that allows direct linking, like PBase, Flickr and a bunch of others. In your DPR thread, you then post the image URL with '.jpg' (without the quotes) on the end in the DPR post, the image will be displayed in your post. Before posting, it's a good idea to click on the preview button to make sure the post is going to look right, then edit again if you need to and preview again until you're ready to post..

Cheers from John from Adelaide, South AustraliaJohn Harvey Photography http://johnharvey.com.auCanon 40D, Canon 20D, Fuji F100fd, Fuji F10..

Comment #29

Attached are some photos to look at. I hope it works, I'm finding this embedding lark rather confusing..

Before.

Image control:Zoom outZoom 100%Zoom inExpand AllOpen in new window.

Image control:Zoom outZoom 100%Zoom inExpand AllOpen in new window.

After.

Image control:Zoom outZoom 100%Zoom inExpand AllOpen in new window.

Image control:Zoom outZoom 100%Zoom inExpand AllOpen in new window.

Image control:Zoom outZoom 100%Zoom inExpand AllOpen in new window.

RegardsJ..

Comment #30

Here is my 50mm link from flickr in case the other doesn't work..

Http://www.flickr.com/photos/junelloyd/sets/72157605695357540/.

RegardsJ..

Comment #31

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