snubbr.com

How do i avoid this problem? . . w/sample photo (1 image)
Camera: Sony DSC-H7Location: Extremely well-lit gymnasiumCamera Setting: Approx 1/300 shutter speed, Auto ISO, zoomed in about 4x.

[IMG]http://i9.photobucket.com/albums/a54/03_silver_sv/DSC04679.jpg[/IMG].

I tried using the "Sport mode", but the shutter speed is forced to stay at 1/60 and doesn't stop the action well enough..

What would you suggest I try to get an acceptable picture in this type of atmosphere?..

Comments (33)

K, try this:[IMG].

Image control:Zoom outZoom 100%Zoom inExpand AllOpen in new window..

Comment #1

It looks to me like this is not motion blur but the fact that the camera wasnt focused on the image as there is nothing sharp in the image? What focus mode were you using?.

Regards.

Mike..

Comment #2

Not sure which setting it was on, but I pressed the shutter halfway down and it definately got a good lock on the moving subject. And the H7 has predictive autofocus, so it's not like the subject moved out of the focus area..

I was leaning towards thinking it was a problem with the ISO. I didn't notice the blurriness till near the end of the game, otherwise I would have played around with it more..

But before I shoot next weeks game, I'd like to have an idea for what settings to play around with...

Comment #3

Sportbiker_kev wrote:.

Not sure which setting it was on, but I pressed the shutter halfwaydown and it definately got a good lock on the moving subject. Andthe H7 has predictive autofocus, so it's not like the subject movedout of the focus area..

Is this the full (resized) image or a cropped section of a larger picture?.

I've looked at the boards on the wooden floor, trying to see at which point the focus was sharp. As far as I can tell, nowhere is sharp. If this were due to motion blur (too low shutter speed) then I would expect to see sharper imaging of the non-moving background or floor..

Unless - were you attempting to pan (swing the camera to keep a moving subject in the frame)?.

I was leaning towards thinking it was a problem with the ISO. Ididn't notice the blurriness till near the end of the game, otherwiseI would have played around with it more..

In general, a lower ISO would allow sharper imaging of the building and stationary objects. Higher ISO would allow faster shutter speed, and be better for action. Although high ISO often means noise reduction is applied resulting in softer, less detailed images. I'm not entirely convinced I see motion blur here, except perhaps in the hands and fingers..

But before I shoot next weeks game, I'd like to have an idea for whatsettings to play around with..

Do you have other example shots (better or worse) - more information might help with advice.Regards,Peter..

Comment #4

Is this the full (resized) image or a cropped section of a largerpicture?.

That's the full picture..

Unless - were you attempting to pan (swing the camera to keep amoving subject in the frame)?.

Yes, I definately was panning the camera. I assumed that that would be acceptable with a high shutter speed..

Do you have other example shots (better or worse) - more informationmight help with advice..

Here's some more examples:This one is using the same settings as the other one, only not zoomed in as far:.

Image control:Zoom outZoom 100%Zoom inExpand AllOpen in new window.

And this one is on the "Sport Mode" which clearly isn't a fast enough shutter speed:.

Image control:Zoom outZoom 100%Zoom inExpand AllOpen in new window..

Comment #5

I'm not getting any exif data on your photo - what ISO is the image?.

As others have mentioned, nothing looks to be in focus. I second what sherwoodpete said.

Sherwoodpete wrote:.

...Although high ISO often means noisereduction is applied resulting in softer, less detailed images. I'mnot entirely convinced I see motion blur here, except perhaps in thehands and fingers..

My guess is you've got "blur" from high ISO noise reduction, that's why I want to know the ISO for the image..

Sportbiker_kev wrote:.

Camera: Sony DSC-H7Location: Extremely well-lit gymnasiumCamera Setting: Approx 1/300 shutter speed, Auto ISO, zoomed in about 4x.

Obviously I wasn't there - the gymnasium was "extremely well-lit" to who - what's well-lit to your eye is not necessarily well-lit to a camera..

Gymnasiums are notoriously difficult to shoot in - fast moving subjects under less-than-ideal lighting conditions..

Not sure which setting it was on, but I pressed the shutter halfwaydown and it definately got a good lock on the moving subject. Andthe H7 has predictive autofocus, so it's not like the subject movedout of the focus area..

Not intentionally trying to give you a hard time, but the camera "thinking" it got a good focus lock doesn't automatically mean it "definitely" got a good lock. Nothing in your posted image appears to be "in-focus"..

And every part of image seems to me to have the same amount of out-of-focusness. So in other words, it doesn't look to me like the camera mis-focused - for example it's not unusual for a camera to sometimes lock focus on something in the background instead the intended subject..

But before I shoot next weeks game, I'd like to have an idea for whatsettings to play around with..

Note I do not have your model camera..

Personally I would suggest you not rely on your camera to acquire focus-lock (let alone lock then track) on a reasonably quick moving target..

Suggest you lock-focus to a particular area of the floor and wait for the action to come to you..

Or set focus to a particular distance either manually or point the camera at a stationary object at about the right distance then re-aim to your subject, and wait for something exciting to happen..

My 2 cents..

Good Day,Roonal.

'Money doesn't buy happiness, but it makes for an extravagant depression' by golf tournament sportscaster..

Comment #6

Sportbiker_kev wrote:.

Here's some more examples:This one is using the same settings as the other one, only not zoomedin as far:.

Image control:Zoom outZoom 100%Zoom inExpand AllOpen in new window.

Not getting the ISO - what was it for this one?.

And this one is on the "Sport Mode" which clearly isn't a fast enoughshutter speed:.

Image control:Zoom outZoom 100%Zoom inExpand AllOpen in new window.

I see the ISO is 320. Would like to know how this ISO setting compares to the others?.

Focus looks better than the other two images, just that the shutter speed was too slow to freeze the action..

Good Day,Roonal.

'Money doesn't buy happiness, but it makes for an extravagant depression' by golf tournament sportscaster..

Comment #7

I'll have to check when I get home. I only have the ones that I edited on my jumpdrive here at work..

How do you find out what ISO it was taken at?..

Comment #8

From the images you posted :.

(1) There is no motion blur. Motion blur would have a 'ghost' like appearance in moving objects. Like a trail to follow..

(2) It's not shake blur because that has similar effects to motion blur, but with everything in the image affected, not just moving objects..

(3) There is visible noise and noise reduction artifacts in the images you posted, which you say are full size. Clearly these are at very high ISO ( which the camera needed to get an exposure indoors in what is low light for a camera )..

(4) They are way out of focus. Just because the camera beeps or claims to have a focus does not mean it actually has a focus. It means it thinks it has a focus or has given up. In low light situations ( like these ) all cameras will have problems..

To avoid this you need to be able to :.

(a) Keep ISO as low as possible ( do not use auto ISO ).(b) Keep shutter speed high ( shoot in 'S' = 'Tv' mode to select shutter speed )(c) Use a lens with a wide aperture ( if you had a DSLR )(d) Use a flash if possible ( which is not really practical in a sport )(e) Use a focus assist lamp if you are close enough.

(f) If possible use manual focus ( assuming you have a lens with a focus ring on a DSLR )..

The combination of these will help get the shot..

However you cannot do these except on a hit and miss basis and will have to compromise to a greater or lesser extent. You can expect missed shots especially if you have a P&S. If you expect to freeze indoor action like this on a P&S like a professional sports shot then think again - that requires a DSLR ( so you can shoot at ISO 400 and even 800 with relatively low noise ) and a good wide aperture lens. DSLRs also use a different ( faster ) method of focusing than P&S cameras ( phase detection rather than contrast detection )..

The camera's sport mode will almost certainly be the optimal settings for shooting - the designers do know what they are doing and in sports mode the camera will try and get the best compromise it can from the list I've indicated. You probably cannot do better and I'd suggest if you're unhappy with it you need to consider a DSLR and appropriate lens. Alternatively you need to lower your expectations - perhaps I should say you ought to lower expectations even with a DSLR as good results require good technique and luck as well..

NeatImage or Noise Ninja might help with the noise a little, but it's very high and I'd expect little from this. Check if your camera has a high speed focus mode ( some P&S cameras do ). This might help a little..

StephenG.

Pentax K100DFuji S5200Fuji E900PCLinuxOS..

Comment #9

That was quite helpful, thanks a million..

I guess what I will try next week is set the ISO as low as possible and play around with the focus...

Comment #10

Sportbiker_kev wrote:.

Is this the full (resized) image or a cropped section of a largerpicture?.

That's the full picture..

O.K. I thought that it might be soft simply because it was a crop, the fact that it's the full image rules out that explanation..

Unless - were you attempting to pan (swing the camera to keep amoving subject in the frame)?.

Yes, I definately was panning the camera. I assumed that that wouldbe acceptable with a high shutter speed..

Up to a point. Though with arms and legs moving in different directions, it can't solve all problems, but might contribute some camera shake. Though with a high shutter speed it should be o.k..

Do you have other example shots (better or worse) - more informationmight help with advice..

Here's some more examples:This one is using the same settings as the other one, only not zoomedin as far:.

Image control:Zoom outZoom 100%Zoom inExpand AllOpen in new window.

Above - definitely the moving hand and arm are moving and it shows. But there's still an overall lack of sharpness which may be due to: incorrect focus, high-ISO noise reduction, camera movement or movement of the rest of the subject..

And this one is on the "Sport Mode" which clearly isn't a fast enoughshutter speed:.

Image control:Zoom outZoom 100%Zoom inExpand AllOpen in new window.

Above, settings were 1/60 sec f/3.2 ISO 320, focal length 11.9mm. You are right that the shutter speed isn't fast enough. And yet to my eyes this is the sharpest of all the images - in places. Obviously the ball and moving people are blurred due to movement, but the stationary parts don't look too bad. A faster shutter speed would help with the motion, but calls for a higher ISO.regards,Peter..

Comment #11

Sportbiker_kev wrote:.

I'll have to check when I get home. I only have the ones that Iedited on my jumpdrive here at work..

How do you find out what ISO it was taken at?.

For Windows: pull up your image,.

- right-click on the image- from the drop-down menu select "Properties" at the bottom- on the next window click on the "Summary" tab at the top- on the next pop-window click on "Advanced" button.

Or in an image editor look for something like file info..

Or you can download an exif reader such the (free) one from Opanda which can allow you to read exif data (if it's there) of images posted online..

Http://www.opanda.com/en/iexif/.

Good Day,Roonal.

'Money doesn't buy happiness, but it makes for an extravagant depression' by golf tournament sportscaster..

Comment #12

I have a Sony H9 (same as yours but with a few extra features). As the previous poster stated, there is no motion blur, etc. This is because sports mode uses some predictive techniques or whatever to get the shot..

Sports mode on these cameras do not work though like you would like it to. The problem with the sport mode is that the shutter speed doesn't get as high as you want it to for low light situations. Sports mode will work better in areas with more light but low light (indoors) you would do better with the AUTO or manual mode or Shutter priority and adjusting the shutter speed appropriately..

I have tried to use sports mode but several H9/H7 owners have complained of it not working and writing to Sony about it. Funny thing is the new H50 is now out and may have improved on it (so they claim)..

You can do a search in the SONY forum section. There have been plenty of posts on this subject for more information...

Comment #13

*fromhttp://www.aakatz.com*.

AF Illumination: I usually set this to "Off" unless I'm shooting in low light in close settings, such as children in a room at night or formal flash portrait sessions. The reason is that the autofocus illumination light only works out to about 12 feet from the camera, so it's generally useless at concerts, sporting events and for low-light wildlife shots. Turning the light off (when it wouldn't work anyway) can actually improve low-light autofocus performance. The camera isn't looking for the illumination assist, so it goes right to work attempting to focus in the available light..

There's another thing I'll have to check..

Comment #14

Unfortunately, the conditions you're shooting in are beyond the capability of your camera. The EXIF data on your 2nd 'more samples' image shows 1/60 sec, f/3.2 (wide open?) and ISO 320. You may not be able to open the lens any wider, the shutter speed is already very slow and pushing ISO further is going to mean more noise. In addition, you appear to have a focusing problem (not panning). Even much better cameras can have focusing problems in low light with subjects on the move. If yoiu coulid somehow use some off-camera flash to illuminate your subject, you may get past the lighting problem, but not focusing..

If you're serious about getting good action photos in this kind of lighting, I really thinkg you need a better camera/lens. In fact, I'd go so far as to say you need a DSLR with a fast enough lens and not a compact camera..

Cheers from John from Adelaide, South AustraliaJohn Harvey Photography http://johnharvey.com.auCanon 40D, Canon 20D & Fuji F10..

Comment #15

Mike Goodman wrote:.

I have a Sony H9 (same as yours but with a few extra features). Asthe previous poster stated, there is no motion blur, etc..

In the same lighting conditions, it would stuggle too, unless it has a faster lens than the f/3.2 being used here..

This isbecause sports mode uses some predictive techniques or whatever toget the shot..

Predicitive techniques can only track the subject for focus, not freeze the action..

Sports mode on these cameras do not work though like you would likeit to. The problem with the sport mode is that the shutter speeddoesn't get as high as you want it to for low light situations..

That's only true if the light is so low that it can't shoot faster. It's a camera limitation with the available light..

Sports mode will work better in areas with more light but low light(indoors) you would do better with the AUTO or manual mode or Shutterpriority and adjusting the shutter speed appropriately..

Disagree. Surely you can't simply choose a faster shutter speed and get proper exposure if the light level is too low for the capabilities of the camera..

I have tried to use sports mode but several H9/H7 owners havecomplained of it not working and writing to Sony about it. Funnything is the new H50 is now out and may have improved on it (so theyclaim)..

OK. Let's say sort mode really is faulty. There's still going to be a very real limit to how far you can push a compact camera for low light action shots. I'm not baching compact cameras, but at the same time they do have some very real limitations and low light shooting without lighting assitance is a classic instance of where they're weak..

You can do a search in the SONY forum section. There have beenplenty of posts on this subject for more information..

Maybe something there will help, but don't expect miracles..

Cheers from John from Adelaide, South AustraliaJohn Harvey Photography http://johnharvey.com.auCanon 40D, Canon 20D & Fuji F10..

Comment #16

Sjgcit wrote:.

From the images you posted :.

(1) There is no motion blur. Motion blur would have a 'ghost' likeappearance in moving objects. Like a trail to follow..

Did you look at the samples here?http://forums.dpreview.com/...forums/read.asp?forum=1002&message=26951256Motion blur is very obvious, in addition to dodgy focus in the first..

To avoid this you need to be able to :.

(a) Keep ISO as low as possible ( do not use auto ISO )..

That's part of the problem with compact cams. ISO needed for decent shutter speeds is too high and noisy..

(b) Keep shutter speed high ( shoot in 'S' = 'Tv' mode to selectshutter speed ).

Can't do it in low light with compact cam without additional lighting, which isn't practical..

(c) Use a lens with a wide aperture ( if you had a DSLR ).

This post is about the OP's compact camera. However, I agree that he really needs to use a DSLR with faster lens for this kind of action photography..

(d) Use a flash if possible ( which is not really practical in a sport )(e) Use a focus assist lamp if you are close enough(f) If possible use manual focus ( assuming you have a lens with afocus ring on a DSLR )..

Pre-focusing may work, but manual focus on the fly is pretty much impossible..

The combination of these will help get the shot..

However you cannot do these except on a hit and miss basis and willhave to compromise to a greater or lesser extent. You can expectmissed shots especially if you have a P&S. If you expect to freezeindoor action like this on a P&S like a professional sports shot thenthink again - that requires a DSLR ( so you can shoot at ISO 400 andeven 800 with relatively low noise ) and a good wide aperture lens.DSLRs also use a different ( faster ) method of focusing than P&Scameras ( phase detection rather than contrast detection )..

Agree..

The camera's sport mode will almost certainly be the optimal settingsfor shooting - the designers do know what they are doing and insports mode the camera will try and get the best compromise it canfrom the list I've indicated. You probably cannot do better and I'dsuggest if you're unhappy with it you need to consider a DSLR andappropriate lens. Alternatively you need to lower your expectations- perhaps I should say you ought to lower expectations even with aDSLR as good results require good technique and luck as well..

NeatImage or Noise Ninja might help with the noise a little, but it'svery high and I'd expect little from this. Check if your camera hasa high speed focus mode ( some P&S cameras do ). This might help alittle..

StephenG.

Pentax K100DFuji S5200Fuji E900PCLinuxOS.

Cheers from John from Adelaide, South AustraliaJohn Harvey Photography http://johnharvey.com.auCanon 40D, Canon 20D & Fuji F10..

Comment #17

Sportbiker_kev wrote:.

That was quite helpful, thanks a million..

I guess what I will try next week is set the ISO as low as possibleand play around with the focus..

If you use lower ISO, sure there will be less noise, but shutter speed, which is already way too long, will be even longer and your action shots will be way worse than they already are. While focus is important, why do you think you can get away with a longer shutter when you're already seeing motion blur?.

If you plan to use manual focus, pre-focus at the distance you want and then wait for your subject to move to that distance. You won't be able to manually focus on a moving subject with your compact camera. It's even tough (impossible for most of us) with a DSLR..

Cheers from John from Adelaide, South AustraliaJohn Harvey Photography http://johnharvey.com.auCanon 40D, Canon 20D & Fuji F10..

Comment #18

You mean dodgeball is real ? consider my mind blown..

Sportbiker_kev wrote:.

Of course it is!Dodgeball rocks..

Comment #19

Hi....I haven't read all of the thread yet........but.......What is the problem that you are writing about??I don't think you posted the photo just for the sake of photo/camera critics..

The first thing I noticed was,that the photo shows some guy levitating a ball......I think this is really neat.... Near CNN stuff........Or maybe FOXYou should try to capture more like this..........

Comment #20

All I see is that the photo is grainy/noisy,and is soft (not sharp)..

I really don't think it's out of focus that bad....It's just the noise and processing,that has the image soft....This is all based upon the cameras reaction to the avail light...You see it as well lit,and the camera sees it as nearly blind,not enough light.A flash may help..... Otherwise....You've got all it'll do in this light.There are cameras that will do much better as far as the amount of light....The Compact Fuji F-30 and F-31 are two....However....they have a limited 3x zoom range......

DP review in it's own words,"The F-30 is far and away the best low light compact camera on the market today, bar none".

Go out side on a good day,and try the same shot.Maybe on a basketball court..Keep the sun to your back.You should see a better photo..........

Comment #21

But considering the sport being photographed, the most important advice has been missed out, The Five 'D's!:.

Dodge!.

Dip!.

Duck!.

Dive!.

And uh.... Dodge!Laurence.

I shoot with an EphZedFifty.My flickr: http://flickr.com/photos/12102118@N06/..

Comment #22

Hamx15 wrote:.

All I see is that the photo is grainy/noisy,and is soft (not sharp).I really don't think it's out of focus that bad....It's just thenoise and processing,that has the image soft.....

Check out his other samples and then say that first one you saw doesn't have a focus problem.http://forums.dpreview.com/...forums/read.asp?forum=1002&message=26951256.

I agree that high ISO (no EXIF data for that one, so we can't tell) would kill IQ with a compact camera like this and it seems to be more of an issue in that first sample than in the other two, where one shows ISO 320..

This is all based upon the cameras reaction to the avail light...You see it as well lit,and the camera sees it as nearly blind,notenough light.A flash may help..... Otherwise....You've got all it'll do in thislight.There are cameras that will do much better as far as the amount oflight....The Compact Fuji F-30 and F-31 are two....However....they have a limited 3x zoom range.....DP review in it's own words,"The F-30 is far and away the best lowlight compact camera on the market today, bar none".

Go out side on a good day,and try the same shot.Maybe on a basketballcourt..Keep the sun to your back.You should see a better photo.........

Cheers from John from Adelaide, South AustraliaJohn Harvey Photography http://johnharvey.com.auCanon 40D, Canon 20D & Fuji F10..

Comment #23

This is true. In fact, the site you found this information on is the one I used to setup my camera settings..

I'm pretty sure I've disabled the AF Illumination but I will double check that and test it again...

Comment #24

I understand how cameras work. This may or may not be a Sports Mode issue but Sport mode doesn't work. I'm trying to explain it in terms that the original poster can understand. Let me try again so it is clear since I do own this model of camera..

To a certain extent this is a low light problem. But not completely..

What is needed is more light and fast shutter speed (to capture the action). Sports mode is trying to do this for the camera operator in a sort of automatic way by adjusting the F-Stop to let in more light and achieving the fastest shutter speed possible, that is what it should be doing. Doesn't matter how much light there is, you can manually adjust the F-stop to gain some shutter speed in situations where the camera allows it..

The problem some of us owners are having is that the shutter speed doesn't get to where it needs to be even when there is enough light and room for the aperature to let in more light. It just won't do it because of some preset programming Sony did with the sports mode. I have the H9 and I've tried it and it doesn't work as advertised. It just won't go past a certain shutter speed because of something Sony did with programming that mode on the camera..

In better light you may get better results but even then it has it's limitations. You can do the same things in manual or S (shutter priority mode) but you have to actually make the adjustments yourself versus letting the camera automatically try to make them for you. Like I said before, I get better results in AUTO mode than in SPORTS mode...

Comment #25

Mike Goodman wrote:.

I understand how cameras work. This may or may not be a Sports Modeissue but Sport mode doesn't work. I'm trying to explain it interms that the original poster can understand. Let me try again soit is clear since I do own this model of camera..

To a certain extent this is a low light problem. But not completely..

What is needed is more light and fast shutter speed (to capture theaction). Sports mode is trying to do this for the camera operatorin a sort of automatic way by adjusting the F-Stop to let in morelight and achieving the fastest shutter speed possible, that is whatit should be doing. Doesn't matter how much light there is, you canmanually adjust the F-stop to gain some shutter speed in situationswhere the camera allows it..

The problem some of us owners are having is that the shutter speeddoesn't get to where it needs to be even when there is enough lightand room for the aperature to let in more light. It just won't do itbecause of some preset programming Sony did with the sports mode. Ihave the H9 and I've tried it and it doesn't work as advertised. Itjust won't go past a certain shutter speed because of something Sonydid with programming that mode on the camera..

In better light you may get better results but even then it has it'slimitations. You can do the same things in manual or S (shutterpriority mode) but you have to actually make the adjustments yourselfversus letting the camera automatically try to make them for you.Like I said before, I get better results in AUTO mode than in SPORTSmode..

Hi Mike. Thanks for explaining things. What an odd design decision to limit shutter speed or not open the aperture in sports mode, unless it really is an error. Surely sports is all about shutter speed, so whatever it takes to achieve higher shutter speed must be worth considering, except of course pushing ISO higher than the camera can really handle, which isn't very high for compacts..

The other samples the OP posted give a much better idea of what's going on, much mroe than the original very fuzzy one, at least as I see it anyway..

Cheers from John from Adelaide, South AustraliaJohn Harvey Photography http://johnharvey.com.auCanon 40D, Canon 20D & Fuji F10..

Comment #26

Mike Goodman wrote:.

In better light you may get better results but even then it has it'slimitations. You can do the same things in manual or S (shutterpriority mode) but you have to actually make the adjustments yourselfversus letting the camera automatically try to make them for you.Like I said before, I get better results in AUTO mode than in SPORTSmode..

You mention Shutter Priority mode. I've often considered that the best way to force the highest shutter speed is to instead use Aperture Priority. With the aperture wide open and a suitable ISO setting, the camera will select the highest possible speed..

Using Shutter Priority risks failing in one of two ways. If the shutter speed selected is too high, the correct exposure may require a wider aperture than is physically possible. Conversely, if the shutter speed selected is too low, the camera will need to close the aperture for correct exposure, and some advantage has been lost..

On the other hand, in an environment where the lighting is fixed, Manual mode can be the best setting. There are cases where a dark background might cause the Auto mode to unnecessarily choose a slower shutter speed.Regards,Peter..

Comment #27

Correct and I agree. The camera is far from being a DSLR but above your average point and shoot. I like mine but I certainly don't use Sports mode and I really try to stick with Manual mode when possible. I use auto when the situation is just too dynamic..

The whole point of me moving to this camera was to get away from AUTO point and shoots so I could get those shots that I couldn't seem to get. If you have a Manual mode you might as well use it, right?.

Of course, now I want to achieve those shots that this camera can't get and I want a DSLR..

Santa, bring me a D300 for Xmas and a nice lense I can play with.   I know, quite an upgrade..

Mike..

Comment #28

I would agree and I think that Sports mode put in high ISO as well in the picture to make up for the lack of light. Of course, it created a crappy picture...

Comment #29

Mike Goodman wrote:.

Correct and I agree. The camera is far from being a DSLR but aboveyour average point and shoot. I like mine but I certainly don't useSports mode and I really try to stick with Manual mode when possible.I use auto when the situation is just too dynamic..

The whole point of me moving to this camera was to get away from AUTOpoint and shoots so I could get those shots that I couldn't seem toget. If you have a Manual mode you might as well use it, right?.

Of course, now I want to achieve those shots that this camera can'tget and I want a DSLR..

Santa, bring me a D300 for Xmas and a nice lense I can play with. I know, quite an upgrade..

Mike.

Mike, I guess you can't be too greedy, so one nice lens is a good start, right? Good luck with Santa..

Cheers from John from Adelaide, South AustraliaJohn Harvey Photography http://johnharvey.com.auCanon 40D, Canon 20D & Fuji F10..

Comment #30

Sherwoodpete wrote:.

Mike Goodman wrote:.

In better light you may get better results but even then it has it'slimitations. You can do the same things in manual or S (shutterpriority mode) but you have to actually make the adjustments yourselfversus letting the camera automatically try to make them for you.Like I said before, I get better results in AUTO mode than in SPORTSmode..

You mention Shutter Priority mode. I've often considered that thebest way to force the highest shutter speed is to instead useAperture Priority. With the aperture wide open and a suitable ISOsetting, the camera will select the highest possible speed.Using Shutter Priority risks failing in one of two ways. If theshutter speed selected is too high, the correct exposure may requirea wider aperture than is physically possible. Conversely, if theshutter speed selected is too low, the camera will need to close theaperture for correct exposure, and some advantage has been lost.On the other hand, in an environment where the lighting is fixed,Manual mode can be the best setting. There are cases where a darkbackground might cause the Auto mode to unnecessarily choose a slowershutter speed.Regards,Peter.

Hi Peter. Good advice for sure, except as you say the background can still screw up yoiur best efforts unless you can somehow take it into account. I'm sure you'd agree that some test shots to determine the best shutter speed to go along with the wide open aperture and chosen ISO and then use with manual mode wouldn't be such a bad idea, assuming the lighting on the subjects doesn't change too much through the area of interest..

Of course, the test shots will also help you to figure out what ISO you need for a suitable shutter speed, or to determine whether the camera can actually provide reasonable results in the lighting conditions at all..

Cheers from John from Adelaide, South AustraliaJohn Harvey Photography http://johnharvey.com.auCanon 40D, Canon 20D & Fuji F10..

Comment #31

Cheers from John from Adelaide, South AustraliaJohn Harvey Photography http://johnharvey.com.auCanon 40D, Canon 20D & Fuji F10..

Comment #32

In looking back at the H9 review the review mentions this about Sports Mode:.

"Sports mode chooses small aperture over high shutter speed, and is therefore pointless unless used in really, really bright light".

That is also my experience with Sports mode...

Comment #33

Click Here to View All...

Sponsored Amazon Deals:

1. Get big savings on Amazon warehouse deals.
2. Save up to 70% on Amazon Products.


This question was taken from a support group/message board and re-posted here so others can learn from it.

 

Categories: Home | Diet & Weight Management | Vitamins & Supplements | Herbs & Cleansing |

Sexual Health | Medifast Support | Nutrisystem Support | Medifast Questions |

Web Hosting | Web Hosts | Website Hosting | Hosting |

Web Hosting | GoDaddy | Digital Cameras | Best WebHosts |

Web Hosting FAQ | Web Hosts FAQ | Hosting FAQ | Hosting Group |

Hosting Questions | Camera Tips | Best Cameras To Buy | Best Cameras This Year |

Camera Q-A | Digital Cameras Q-A | Camera Forum | Nov 2010 - Cameras |

Oct 2010 - Cameras | Oct 2010 - DSLRs | Oct 2010 - Camera Tips | Sep 2010 - Cameras |

Sep 2010 - DSLRS | Sep 2010 - Camera Tips | Aug 2010 - Cameras | Aug 2010 - DSLR Tips |

Aug 2010 - Camera Tips | July 2010 - Cameras | July 2010 - Nikon Cameras | July 2010 - Canon Cameras |

July 2010 - Pentax Cameras | Medifast Recipes | Medifast Recipes Tips | Medifast Recipes Strategies |

Medifast Recipes Experiences | Medifast Recipes Group | Medifast Recipes Forum | Medifast Support Strategies |

Medifast Support Experiences |

 

(C) Copyright 2010 All rights reserved.