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Horizontal/Vertical LPH resolution at difference sensor resolution
This is a question on the resolution of each reviews by using ISO 12233 camera resolution test chart. I have read the explanation of the "Learn: Glossary: Digital Imaging: Resolution", but I'm not sure yet.....

For example, which is higher resolution for the below case with same print size "A4" ? .

1. Horizontal/Vertical LPH resolution "2500" at full size sensor(12M) such as EOS 5D..

2. Horizontal/Vertical LPH resolution "2500" at APS-C sensor(8M) such as EOS 350D..

Is it basically same resolution from the viewpoint of a picture quality ? .

I'm not sure, whether the imaging resolution "2500" already has been reflected each sensor resolution as the result or not...

Comments (7)

Fuji wrote:.

This is a question on the resolution of each reviews by using ISO12233 camera resolution test chart. I have read the explanation ofthe "Learn: Glossary: Digital Imaging: Resolution", but I'm not sureyet.....

For example, which is higher resolution for the below case with sameprint size "A4" ? .

1. Horizontal/Vertical LPH resolution "2500" at full size sensor(12M)such as EOS 5D.2. Horizontal/Vertical LPH resolution "2500" at APS-C sensor(8M) suchas EOS 350D..

Is it basically same resolution from the viewpoint of a picturequality ?I'm not sure, whether the imaging resolution "2500" already has beenreflected each sensor resolution as the result or not..

Same 'resolution' in each case 2500 lines in each are able to be resolved it's here where the issues between the sensor specifications that determine the image quality as it relates to noise; number of photo sites per area et alTelecorder (Dave)My Image Galleries.

Http://www.nikonians-images.com/...hp?cat=500&ppuser=121399&password=.

Http://Telecorder.smugmug.com/.

Image control:Zoom outZoom 100%Zoom inExpand AllOpen in new window..

Comment #1

I think that you may be mixing up two different meanings of the word "Resolution"..

1. Sensor/image resolution measured in pixels..

2. The ability of a camera/lens combination to resolve detail in an image measured in LPH (which I think stands for Lines per Picture height)..

Clearly the two are related - a high pixel sensor will be able to resolve more image detail than a lower pixel sensor with the same lens. If you look at the reviews on this site you will see that the 12 MP Canon 5D has a higher image resolving power than the 8MP Canon 350D.Chris R..

Comment #2

1. Horizontal/Vertical LPH resolution "2500" at full size sensor(12M)such as EOS 5D.2. Horizontal/Vertical LPH resolution "2500" at APS-C sensor(8M) suchas EOS 350D..

Is it basically same resolution from the viewpoint of a picturequality ? .

It is the same amount of recorded detail. So in the final print, it is the same resolution. In fact, that is preciselywhy they use LPH. It normalizes the resolution across a wide variety of format sizes..

You could say that the smaller sensor has a higher linear resolution in lp/mm (line pairs per mm) as measured at the sensor and be correct though. The smaller sensor isn't recording more total picture detail though. It is just recording the same picture detail on a smaller format. That smaller format is enlarged more to get the same picture which is why you end up with the same level of picture detail..

BTW, I'm taking your example as a pure hypothetical. In fact, the 5D should have more LPH than the 350D..

I'm not sure, whether the imaging resolution "2500" already has beenreflected each sensor resolution as the result or not..

LPH = Lines per Picture Height.

Jay Turbervillehttp://www.jayandwanda.com..

Comment #3

I would guess that the LPH is directly related to the PPUA (pixels per unit area). I just made that up;-) the sensor is made with a particular process technology with they change (upgrade) every few years. this is simular in CPU's if your into computers at all since they are based on the same tech. so the pixel spacing on the sensor is as small as they can get with a particular process. for the higher resolution, full size sensor, camera they just put more in a bigger area, but the spacing is the same (PPUA). actually because of marketing they dont maximize the space for each process step so they can get incremental steps between process updrades, as it is VERY expensive to jump to the next process technology node.

Hope this helps..

Comment #4

I just indicate actual data of the reviews in this dpreview.com..

EOS 5D (12.8M pix) full size sensor :.

Horizontal LPH 2500(extinction resolution.).

SONY A700(12.25M pix) APS-C sensor;.

Horizontal LPH 2900(extinction resolution.).

Please refer the following info;http://www.dpreview.com/reviews/canoneos5d/page31.asphttp://www.dpreview.com/reviews/sonydslra700/page31.asp.

As you can see, APS-C sensor has better ability on the resolution than full size sensor in this case..

So, from only viewpoint of resolution issue, should user choose the A700 for a picture quality ? In short, big sensor does not mean under almost same resolution !?..

Comment #5

Yes, on resolution alone pick the a700, if you trust the review. as I mentioned in my previous post the a700 probably has more PPUA sensor. however the difference is only about 10%, there may be other feature that more that make up the difference there, maybe not. thats for you to decide:-)..

Comment #6

I would guess that the LPH is directly related to the PPUA (pixelsper unit area). I just made that up;-) the sensor is made with aparticular process technology with they change (upgrade) every fewyears. this is simular in CPU's if your into computers at all sincethey are based on the same tech. so the pixel spacing on the sensoris as small as they can get with a particular process..

You seem to be suggesting that we get finer pixel pitches as the process technology improves. That really isn't the case. Improved process technology is not the main driver at the sensor level. If it were, we'd already have 32Mp sensors in our DSLRs. Pixels are typically significantly larger than the smallest components in other processors. The improved process technology probably does help the designers give the photodiode portion of the image pixel a greater proportion of the "pixel" real estate and does allow them to pack faster image processors into our cameras which makes managing the increased sensor data from sensors with higher pixel counts more manageable..

For thehigher resolution, full size sensor, camera they just put more in abigger area, but the spacing is the same (PPUA)..

But that isn't the case. Larger sensor DSLRs typically have a pixel spacing of around 4-5 microns these days while the super compacts use spacings well below 2 microns. If they really used the same spacing, the DSLRs would have about four times their current pixel count. Further, current DSLR pixel spacing is still larger than the spacing used in sensors for compact digital cameras back in 2000. If we used the pixel spacing of a circa 2000 Coopix 995 on a "full frame" sensor, we'd have a sensor with around 75 megapixels!! So with eight year old sensor process technology, they could have packed three time the number of pixels onto a "full frame" sensor. They, of course, didn't do that.



Jay Turbervillehttp://www.jayandwanda.com..

Comment #7

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