snubbr.com

Help with colour management and photoshop
Hi everyone.

I've currently got photoshop CS3 and I'm having difficulties processing my RAW files or even normal JPEGs. My monitor is an LG L1953T LCD. When I go to open my RAW files it says the embedded colour profile is Adobe RGB 1998 whereas my monitor is RGB L1953T..

I've changed the colour profile to my monitor, but since the photos open with a diff format, the colours are all stuffed up...i.e. I get a beige colour instead of the standard black/white if that makes sense.

Any help will be appreciated. Cheers..

Comments (25)

Wheng88 wrote:.

Hi everyone.

I've currently got photoshop CS3 and I'm having difficultiesprocessing my RAW files or even normal JPEGs. My monitor is an LGL1953T LCD. When I go to open my RAW files it says the embeddedcolour profile is Adobe RGB 1998 whereas my monitor is RGB L1953T..

Hi Wheng. Your image needs to have a colour space like aRGB to show what real world colours each RGB value in your image should look like. Likewise, your monitor has it's own profile to specify what real world colours it will display for each RGB value sent to the monitor. Two different things..

What Photoshop does is takes your image RGB values and, knowing the colour space being used for that image, uses that informaiton along with your monitor profile and works out (for display purposes) what RGB values to send to the monitor to show the same colours on your monitor that your image RGB values are meant to represent. If the image colours are outside the gamut of your monitor, then some further adjustments are made through the rendering intent being used so that it all fits your monitor display capability (don't worry too much about that bit)..

I've changed the colour profile to my monitor, but since the photosopen with a diff format, the colours are all stuffed up...i.e. I geta beige colour instead of the standard black/white if that makes sense.

Never change the colour profile of your image to your monitor, especially if you simply assign the new profile, but even if you decide to convert to the monitor profile. It doesn't make sense for most users. It's way better to keep the image colour space as a standard one like aRGB or sRGB. Assigning the monitor profile to the image as it's colour space keeps the same RGB values in your image and tells the system that those RGB values should be displayed as if they were being sent to your monitor, which means the image looks very different to how it should look when those colours are properly interpreted as being aRGB colour space colours..

Converting to another colour space or profile actually changes the RGB values of the image so that they look the same in the new colour space, within the limitations of the gamut of the new colour space. Still, I wouldn't suggest doing that as you end up with a non-standard colour space..

Keep your image as aRGB (or sRGB) and keep your system monitor profile as the right monitor profile..

Any help will be appreciated. Cheers.

Does that make things any clearer?.

Cheers from John from Adelaide, South AustraliaJohn Harvey Photography http://johnharvey.com.auCanon 40D, Canon 20D & Fuji F10..

Comment #1

Thank you for the reply...it does make sense, though I get this message.

Image control:Zoom outZoom 100%Zoom inExpand AllOpen in new window.

I did not alter the image's colour profile, only the one in PS (i.e. I went to edit, colour settings, changed working spaces to my monitor).

If I don't change the colour setting to my monitor's profile, I don't get black and white, in fact white is an impossible colour to get if I leave it at default, I get a beige colour if that makes sense..

Comment #2

Wheng88 wrote:.

Thank you for the reply...it does make sense, though I get this message.

Image control:Zoom outZoom 100%Zoom inExpand AllOpen in new window.

I did not alter the image's colour profile, only the one in PS (i.e.i went to edit, colour settings, changed working spaces to my monitor).

That's not the one to set to your monitor profile. You need to tell Windows to use the monitor profile. Go to Display Properties (right click on desktop and select properties) > Advanced > Color Management > Add the profile of your monitor and Set As Default..

In Photoshop, go to Edit > Color Settings and change Working Spaces RGB to Adobe RGB or sRGB, whichever you prefer. aRGB has a wider gamut and I would recommend using that one for general image work, then converting images to sRGB before saving to post to the web or send to other people for general viewing on their computers..

The dialog you see in Photoshop says that the colour space of the image being opened is different from the working space you have chosen in Photoshop, so what do you want to do about that. You can choose to use the existing colour space embedded in the image. However, in this case, that colour space is ColorMatch RGB, which isn't as standard as aRGB or sRGB, so I'd suggest you don't use ColorMatch RGB unless you have a good reason for doing so. Choose to convert to the working space (aRGB once you've set it and possibly relaunched Photoshop)..

If you open an image in Photoshop that isn't tagged with any colour space but you think is an sRGB image, you will get a dialog box asking what to do if you've selected the Photoshop Color Settings > Color Management Policies check boxes, the 'Ask' boxes. Just tell Photoshop to assign the sRGB colour space to your image and it will be displayed correctly. You can then save the assigned colour space profile with the image when using the 'Save As' dialog..

If I don't change the colour setting to my monitor's profile, I don'tget black and white, in fact white is an impossible colour to get ifi leave it at default, I get a beige colour if that makes sense.

This problem should disappear once you've got the settings right in Windows (monitor profile) and Photoshop (working space colour space and then image colour space for each image)..

Printing gets a bit more complicated again if you want to get it right..

Cheers from John from Adelaide, South AustraliaJohn Harvey Photography http://johnharvey.com.auCanon 40D, Canon 20D & Fuji F10..

Comment #3

Hi John.

I really appreciate your time to help me.

I still haven't been able to solve this problem. I've done exactly as you've said..

1) I've made my sure my monitor/colour management is to my monitor profile by goin thru desktop, right click etc.

2) In photoshop, I've chosen the working space to be Adobe RGB 1998 (which I presume is your meaning of aRGB) - when I chose this option, this is when I lose the white colour altogether; white does not exist at all, even in the palette etc.

3) when I open my RAW files, they appear all yellow coloured, due to the fact that white does not exist, regardless of whether they open as ColourMatch or aRGB/sRGB.....

If you, or anyone else can fix this, I will try to win lotto and share it with you as this is really getting on my nerves!.

Thanks in advance..

Comment #4

I never solved my colour problems until I bought a monitor calibration device; Spyder in my case..

Also see the Adobe Color Management forum:-.

Http://www.adobeforums.com/cgi-bin/webx?14@@.eea5b31..

Comment #5

Athegn wrote:.

I never solved my colour problems until I bought a monitorcalibration device; Spyder in my case..

Also see the Adobe Color Management forum:-.

Http://www.adobeforums.com/cgi-bin/webx?.auCanon 40D, Canon 20D & Fuji F10..

Comment #6

Photoshop doesn't necessarly recognize the settiings that are in your raw (nef) file. It may only be a white balance issue? have you tried taking a raw + jpeg image? open both and compare them. If the jpeg image looks fine, then it's only that you have to make the correct setting in camera raw..

If you create a new image in photoshop, and choose white as the background, does it look white or beige?.

Claude Carrier..

Comment #7

Hi Wheng88!.

Everything John has been telling you is the correct basic procedures you should be following..

Couple of things I'll suggest:.

In your camera's menu change the color setting to either Adobe RGB or sRGB instead of the color match profile and then in your color settings in photoshop, set the same profile and that will eliminate the warning message your getting. If it doesn't then you possibly have some other setting set incorrectly or issue..

Secondl just because you have the "correct or current monitor driver" loaded it does not mean it will give you the correct color on your monitor! This is where a color management software and hardware program comes into play. Why? Monitor settings fluxuate, and degrade after time, external lighting such as lamps, overhead lights and even daylight will affect your monitor. AND regardless what you do you will never get your monitor, print and eye to match 100% you can get real close but not 100%. Just read some color management articles, web sites etc. and you'll see..

Third if you have been adjusting the settings on your monitor at all, contrast, brightness and RGB settings and were not sure of what you were doing go into the monitor's OSD/menu and see if you can reset them to the factory default and see if that helps..

Finally if none of this makes sense or helps, I would suggest going tohttp://www.adobe.com and look for the support tab, scroll down to forums and look for the forum on photoshop, join it's free and you'll get lots of help there, and Adobe photoshop techs review the forums on occassion and will off help, tips etc. The forum is run by photoshop enthusists not Adobe. Hope this helps...

Comment #8

If you go to the ACR forum at Adobe:-.

Http://www.adobeforums.com/webx?13@@.3bbd164e.

You will find that nef files are not always opened by ACR; the Nikon software can get in the way..

Could this be skewing your colours?..

Comment #9

Hi everyone.

I very much appreciate everyone's effort to assist with my problem..

1) My monitor is close to brand new so I don't think the idea of quality changing over time may have been that significant in such a short period unless I have a faulty monitor.

2) If my working space is set to my monitor RGB i.e. LG L1953T RGB, then when I create a new layout, it will be white, HOWEVER, all masks etc, will be beige after that.

Otherwise, if the working space is set to anything under than the aformentioned, then a white layout is impossible to get.

3) I uninstalled the Nikon software, no change unfortunately.

4) Here is a screenshot. perhaps this may help. I tried getting the working space and the embedded profile to be the same i.e. Adobe RGB 1998. When the NEF files or JPEGs are viewed in Adobe Bridge, they are completely fine as you can see in the picture...WHITE!......However, once opened with CS3 and camera raw, the world goes colour blind and my white is gone and beige is the substitute (@#$%) as you can see...BEIGE!.

Image control:Zoom outZoom 100%Zoom inExpand AllOpen in new window.

If only you guys lived around here, you could come over and share the frustration with me. However, once again, I really do appreciate the effort put into help me. Thanks again..

Comment #10

Please go to the Adobe forums and read, question and listen. There are experts there who really understand CS3, ACR, colour management. There maybe problems with the colour matching between Bridge and ACR that they could advise you on. I do know that there has been mention that Bridge has some problems...

Comment #11

Monitors vary from one serial number to another as well. It's not just that they change over time. Also, LCD monitors don't usually change as much as CRT monitors do over time. In this case, the monitor and it's profile don't seem to be the issue. It looks like you've got something wrong with your colour management policies..

When you open an image in ACR, it's beige immediately, even though it looks right in Bridge..

Are you sure you don't have some non-standard camera calibration information in ACR (although that may also afect Bridge)? Go to the Camera Calibration tab and make sure everything is set to 0. Do the same with the HSL and Color tabs..

When you open an image in Photoshop, don't assign any other colour space if there's a mismatch between the image space and the working space as assigning results in the image becoming wrong, although I'm not sure that could cause the beige you're seeing..

I'd also recommend you go to the Adobe forum linked by others..

Cheers from John from Adelaide, South AustraliaJohn Harvey Photography http://johnharvey.com.auCanon 40D, Canon 20D & Fuji F10..

Comment #12

John down under wrote:.

Monitors vary from one serial number to another as well. It's notjust that they change over time. Also, LCD monitors don't usuallychange as much as CRT monitors do over time. In this case, themonitor and it's profile don't seem to be the issue. It looks likeyou've got something wrong with your colour management policies..

When you open an image in ACR, it's beige immediately, even though itlooks right in Bridge..

Are you sure you don't have some non-standard camera calibrationinformation in ACR (although that may also afect Bridge)? Go to theCamera Calibration tab and make sure everything is set to 0. Do thesame with the HSL and Color tabs..

When you open an image in Photoshop, don't assign any other colourspace if there's a mismatch between the image space and the workingspace as assigning results in the image becoming wrong, although I'mnot sure that could cause the beige you're seeing..

I'd also recommend you go to the Adobe forum linked by others..

Cheers from John from Adelaide, South AustraliaJohn Harvey Photography http://johnharvey.com.auCanon 40D, Canon 20D & Fuji F10.

Hi John.

Im interested in what you are saying about Camera Calilbration Tab - where do I find that?and where do I find the HSL and Colour tabs too?..

Comment #13

Actually sorry - I have found those tabs and yes they are set to 0.

I think I must move my case to the Adobe forums. Again thanks to all for your efforts..

Comment #14

I'd just like to let everyone know that I have finally fixed the problem..

If you are interested, it was my monitor calibration after all. I had to use Adobe Gamma to create a new profile and to my shock it worked! My white is now white..thank goodness! I did not believe it at first when using the Adobe Gamma program. I didn't think just adjusting the gamma would affect the colours of photoshop! I am so relieved I can now sleep in peace (:.

Thank you all for your support! .

Wei..

Comment #15

Just when I thought everythign was fixed...i have another issue.

I am unable to save the image in JPG format...only the large formats such as TIFF, RAW, PSD etc...not allowing me to save either bmp etc.

Why..

Comment #16

Wheng88 wrote:.

I'd just like to let everyone know that I have finally fixed theproblem..

If you are interested, it was my monitor calibration after all. I hadto use Adobe Gamma to create a new profile and to my shock it worked!My white is now white..thank goodness! I did not believe it at firstwhen using the Adobe Gamma program. I didn't think just adjusting thegamma would affect the colours of photoshop! I am so relieved I cannow sleep in peace (:.

Thank you all for your support! .

Wei.

Hi Wei. I'm very pleased to hear that you solved your problem. I guess now you have a better idea about the importance of getting the different elements of colour management under control. Maybe the canned monitor profile was wrong after all. Adobe Gamma is better than nothing, but if you like the results you're getting there, then you shold like the results if you use a decent hardware puck based system instead, eg Eye-One 2 or Spyder 3 or that kind of thing..

While I think of it, I should have suggested that you use soft proof view in Photoshop to help figure some more things out. If you choose View > Monitor RGB, that should show you what happens if the RGB values of your image get sent straight to the video system without being converted (on the fly for display purposes) by any colour space information. That shold be the view you see with non-colour manged apps like the IE browser. AFAIK, Monitor RGB doesn't actually use your monitor profile at all, but just passes the image RGB values to the video system..

Setting gamma sets the brightness response (and possibly white point), so it makes sense that if they're wrong, your image display will be wrong because of that. Gamma (actually tone response if it's not a true gamma curve) and possibly white point get loaded to your video card lookup table at Windows startup, so at least some of the image display parameters are correct, even if you're using a non-colour managed viewer like the IE browser. Colours will still be inaccurate in non-colour managed viewers, even for sRGB images, but at least the image should look basically ok..

Cheers from John from Adelaide, South AustraliaJohn Harvey Photography http://johnharvey.com.auCanon 40D, Canon 20D & Fuji F10..

Comment #17

Wheng88 wrote:.

Just when I thought everythign was fixed...i have another issue.

I am unable to save the image in JPG format...only the large formatssuch as TIFF, RAW, PSD etc...not allowing me to save either bmp etc.

Why.

Hi Wei. Maybe your PS installation is corrupted, but I don't what to suggest beyond that. Maybe someone else will know. Perhaps post something in the Retouching Forum (or possibly PC Talk Forum) to ask about that one. It doesn't sound so much like a Beginner's question to me..

Cheers from John from Adelaide, South AustraliaJohn Harvey Photography http://johnharvey.com.auCanon 40D, Canon 20D & Fuji F10..

Comment #18

You are probably using 16 bits for the image. Jpeg only works in 8 bits..

Again go to the Adobe forums and learn from them. Perhaps they could suggest a book to help you...

Comment #19

As Athegn mentionned,.

You must convert your image to 8 bits before being able to save it in jpeg..

Just in case you don't know how, you select the "image" menu, then "convert" then "8 bits"..

You can also convert your image immediatly to 8 bits when opening it in Camera Raw (bottom left drop list, but then you loose one of the advantage of Raw..

It is preferable to convert to 8 bits just before saving to jpeg or if you have to use a filter or tool that doesn't work on 16 bit images..

Have a good day!Claude Carrier..

Comment #20

I have actions set up to save for JPEG and changing to 8 bits is part of the actions, so I don't even think about it. Good pickup..

Cheers from John from Adelaide, South AustraliaJohn Harvey Photography http://johnharvey.com.auCanon 40D, Canon 20D & Fuji F10..

Comment #21

What advantage do you lose when converting to 8bits from RAW 16bt?..

Comment #22

Wheng88 wrote:.

What advantage do you lose when converting to 8bits from RAW 16bt?.

At the final output stage at the end of all your processing, eg when you're ready to print, it's not such a big deal. However, earlier in your processing, it can be very handy to have the extra bit depth to make the processing more accurate and have the extra levels to preserve nice smooth tonal gradations. Depending on how you process, you may see some differences between processing 16 bit and 8 bit images in terms of artifacts, banding/posterisation, etc, etc..

Cheers from John from Adelaide, South AustraliaJohn Harvey Photography http://johnharvey.com.auCanon 40D, Canon 20D & Fuji F10..

Comment #23

Hi,.

Here is an example of the advantage of 16 bits processing (nevert mind the titles in the diffrents photos, it was done for another purpose).

At left : original image.

Middle : If the image on the left had been 8 bits, thiis is the result I would have had trying to recuperate blown highlghts.

Right : If the image on the left had been 16 bits, this is the result I would have had trying to recuperate blown highlights.

Image control:Zoom outZoom 100%Zoom inExpand AllOpen in new window.

Have a good day!.

Claude Carrier..

Comment #24

Click Here to View All...

Sponsored Amazon Deals:

1. Get big savings on Amazon warehouse deals.
2. Save up to 70% on Amazon Products.


This question was taken from a support group/message board and re-posted here so others can learn from it.

 

Categories: Home | Diet & Weight Management | Vitamins & Supplements | Herbs & Cleansing |

Sexual Health | Medifast Support | Nutrisystem Support | Medifast Questions |

Web Hosting | Web Hosts | Website Hosting | Hosting |

Web Hosting | GoDaddy | Digital Cameras | Best WebHosts |

Web Hosting FAQ | Web Hosts FAQ | Hosting FAQ | Hosting Group |

Hosting Questions | Camera Tips | Best Cameras To Buy | Best Cameras This Year |

Camera Q-A | Digital Cameras Q-A | Camera Forum | Nov 2010 - Cameras |

Oct 2010 - Cameras | Oct 2010 - DSLRs | Oct 2010 - Camera Tips | Sep 2010 - Cameras |

Sep 2010 - DSLRS | Sep 2010 - Camera Tips | Aug 2010 - Cameras | Aug 2010 - DSLR Tips |

Aug 2010 - Camera Tips | July 2010 - Cameras | July 2010 - Nikon Cameras | July 2010 - Canon Cameras |

July 2010 - Pentax Cameras | Medifast Recipes | Medifast Recipes Tips | Medifast Recipes Strategies |

Medifast Recipes Experiences | Medifast Recipes Group | Medifast Recipes Forum | Medifast Support Strategies |

Medifast Support Experiences |

 

(C) Copyright 2010 All rights reserved.