snubbr.com

Help! with Camera Settings for a beginner!
Could some experienced photographers help give me some beginning settings for my camera to help me get started learning? I have a new Nikon 40DX with a 18-55 and 75-200 lens. My camera does have an auto setting but I would rather use other settings to obtain better pictures. Some examples of shots I enjoy taking are as follows:.

Day and night sportsLandscape/Nature (Beach/Marsh/Etc...)ArchitecturePortraitsNight time shots of bridges.

If someone could give me some insight on what shutter speed/ISO/aperture/etc.. I need to have my camera set up to take great pictures of each of these scenarios that would be great! I know this will be a lot of trial and error, but I am so far out in left field right now I need a better starting point. I would appreciate your input! Thanks!!!..

Comments (8)

Start with ken rockwells d40 users guide (40x is same except for megapixels) it's quite useful as a starting point..

Http://www.kenrockwell.com/nikon/d40/users-guide/index.htm.

You can also try the links from a quick search I did on google.

Http://www.google.com/search?hl=en&q=photography+tutorials.

Phil..

Comment #1

Almonds wrote:.

Start with ken rockwells d40 users guide (40x is same except formegapixels) it's quite useful as a starting point..

Http://www.kenrockwell.com/nikon/d40/users-guide/index.htm.

1. The man said he wanted to take the camera out of Auto. Ken Rockwell says leave it in Auto..

2. As usual Ken Rockwell's is loose with his language and cavalier with his advice. He describes the metering on both the D40 and D80 as "defective". You would think that IF it was defective on the D80 that Nikon had plenty of time to put it right on the D40..

3. Fact is that metering on the D40/D80 is different in a way that Ken's limited brain power fails to comprehend. (That sounds very unkind but he does seem wholly incapable of flexible thought and is VERY opinionated and egocentric).

4. Matrix metering on the D80 in particular but also the D40 (a) exposes for the shadows not the highlights (b) weights the exposure towards the centre and bottom third of the photo (c) is weighted to the lighting conditions under the cative focus sensor..

5. If you follow his advice and dial in -0,7 EV you will simply get underexposed photo (Remember he lives in SUNNY California)..

Bottom line Ken writes by the yard. Care and attention to detail are not his strong points. Accuracy of advice is sacrificed for getting on with the next yard of typing..

For a more balanced assessment of the camera and how to use it read Thom Hogan's review:-.

Http://www.bythom.com/d40review.htm.

Better still buy his user guide:-.

Http://www.bythom.com/d40guide.htm.

(I recommended the D40x to my son who is delighted with it and bought him Thom's user guide for Christmas).

Chris Elliott.

*Nikon* D Eighty + Fifty - Other equipment in Profile.

Http://PlacidoD.Zenfolio.com/..

Comment #2

What can I say you're right chris ... replied on the fly and forgot all about mr hogan - good catch.

Phil..

Comment #3

Chris Elliott wrote:.

Almonds wrote:.

Start with ken rockwells d40 users guide (40x is same except formegapixels) it's quite useful as a starting point..

Http://www.kenrockwell.com/nikon/d40/users-guide/index.htm.

1. The man said he wanted to take the camera out of Auto. KenRockwell says leave it in Auto.2. As usual Ken Rockwell's is loose with his language and cavalierwith his advice. He describes the metering on both the D40 and D80 as"defective". You would think that IF it was defective on the D80 thatNikon had plenty of time to put it right on the D40.3.

(That sounds veryunkind but he does seem wholly incapable of flexible thought and isVERY opinionated and egocentric)4. Matrix metering on the D80 in particular but also the D40 (a)exposes for the shadows not the highlights (b) weights the exposuretowards the centre and bottom third of the photo (c) is weighted tothe lighting conditions under the cative focus sensor.5. If you follow his advice and dial in -0,7 EV you will simply getunderexposed photo (Remember he lives in SUNNY California)..

Bottom line Ken writes by the yard. Care and attention to detail arenot his strong points. Accuracy of advice is sacrificed for gettingon with the next yard of typing..

For a more balanced assessment of the camera and how to use it readThom Hogan's review:-.

Http://www.bythom.com/d40review.htm.

Better still buy his user guide:-.

Http://www.bythom.com/d40guide.htm.

(I recommended the D40x to my son who is delighted with it and boughthim Thom's user guide for Christmas).

Chris Elliott.

*Nikon* D Eighty + Fifty - Other equipment in Profile.

Http://PlacidoD.Zenfolio.com/.

Thanks for this post. I read KR's guide and felt like sh....I regreted buying the D80, I dialed in -0.7EV, I havn't used matrix metering....Thanks for bringing me back to reality...

Comment #4

LowCountryPhoto wrote:.

Could some experienced photographers help give me some beginningsettings for my camera to help me get started learning?.

Yes, "get started" is the key..

First off - buy Thom Hogan's Guide for the Nikon D40x. I have the D80 book and it is a very comprehensive guide tothe camera as well as some general photographic principles. I absolutely recommend it. Then read it through once to get a feel for it, then re-read individual chapters and subjects. Don't try and learn everything at once..

I have a newNikon 40DX.

That would be D40x. A 40D is a Canon..

Do not expect help from Nikon users if you are going to blaspheme.  Kidding..

Some examples of shots I enjoy taking are as follows:.

Day and night sportsLandscape/Nature (Beach/Marsh/Etc...)ArchitecturePortraitsNight time shots of bridges.

OK, that covers pretty much all possible subjects  so you'll probably want to work on one at a time, they each have different wrinkles but the overall principles remain the same..

If someone could give me some insight on what shutterspeed/ISO/aperture/etc...

Some basic points to get you started:.

ISO determines the sensitivity of the camer'as sensor. Low ISO = low sensitivity, therefore you need to use a wider aperture (see below) and/or slower shutter speed (see below) for a given scene, to achieve correct expsoure. High ISO = you can shoot in lower light, with narrower aperture and/or faste shutter speed, but at possible cost of quality (noise). There's no such thing as a free lunch!.

Start by setting your camera at - oh, say, 400 ISO. Leave it there, and learn about exposure and shutter speed and aperture. Take ISO out of the equation. Ten once you've got a handle on the other variables, you can tinker with ISO..

Don't try to learn / experiment with too many variables at once..

Shutter speed = the amount of time the shutter is open. The slower the speed, the more likely you will get blur from moving subjects (or from shaking of the camera in your hand). Tha faster the speed, the more you will be able to freeze action. 1/60 second, or preferably 1/125, will work for your day to day "snapshots" and successfully freeze people who aren't moving too much. Up to 1/500 or 1/100 for faster moving subjects. Below 1/60 second if you need to, or you actively want some blur (eg rivers and waterfalls often look better if the moving water has a bit of blur to it.



Aperture = the amount the lens is open. Expressed as a fraction of the focal length - e.g. f/8 is 1/8 of the focal length. (Actually it's not as simple as that, but that'll do for now). So f/8 is the same (same amount of light) on every lens. no matter what is the focal length.

Wide aperture = more light, but less depth of field (everything but the focus point wil be blurry)..

So exposure basically means: For a given scene (and how birght it is), and a given ISO setting, there will be various combinations of shutter speed and aperture that will give a correct exposure. Each of these combinations will have a different effect, in terms of whether the subject motion is frozen, how great is the depth of field etc..

...I knowthis will be a lot of trial and error,.

Well, that's the great thing about digital - you can trial and error as much as you like, at zero cost! So go for it. There is no substitute for practice..

There are three exposure modes you will want to play with:.

Aperture Priority (A) = You set the aperture, and the camera sets the "right" shutter speed. Useful when depth of field etc is your priority..

Shutter Priority (S) = You set the shutter speed, the camera sets the "right" aperture. Useful when you want to specify a high shutter speed for freezing action, etc..

In both A and S mode the camera's meter will (try to) ensure a "correct" exposure by selecting the right aperture ot shutter speed..

Manual (M) = You set both aperture and shutter speed. The camera does not ensure correct exposure, it's up to you. The camera provides a display in the viewfinder that tells you whether the expsoure is over, under, or "just right". The great advantage of M mode is you can deliberately over- or under- expose if you judge it necessary. The other modes won't let you do that. (Let's ignore Exposure Compensation for now; once again, one thing at a time).

(There's also matrix vs centre weight vs spot metering, but I suggest you start with matrix and get your head around shutter speed etc, then once you're comfortable with that, you can try out these different modes. One thing at a time.).

Stay away from Program (P) mode IMHO. It's just a fancy version of Auto, and you will (IMHO) learn more and faster in the othe rmodes..

Image control:Zoom outZoom 100%Zoom inExpand AllOpen in new window..

Comment #5

With this link, you can change the ISO, the f-stops, and then actually see what happens to the photo.....

Http://www.dryreading.com/camera/index.html.

Above all.....just get out there and start shooting....you can just dump the bad ones and learn from the EXIF in the good ones..

LucyE- 510 w/2 lens kit!U ZI owner!Olympus C30-20Zhttp://www.pbase.com/lucyFCAS Member #98, Oly Division'Photography is the art of seeing what others do not.'..

Comment #6

Do take a look at Ken Rockwell's site. As phil said it is a good starting point - brief, straightforward. You can read thru the info on the d40 in minutes not days/weeks. Then go to Thom Hogans in depth excellent user guides...

Comment #7

Even though I have a Canon 350D, your advice is the best I've found thus far for starting out...I just wrote it all down in my notebook (in my camera bag) so I can study! Thank you for taking the time to explain these three very confusing (for a beginner) aspects...now it's time to go out and play!Jim S Jordan ~ The Photographer Formerly Known As WingsGirlC19.

Check out my photos: http://myrtleart.smugmug.com..

Comment #8

Click Here to View All...

Sponsored Amazon Deals:

1. Get big savings on Amazon warehouse deals.
2. Save up to 70% on Amazon Products.


This question was taken from a support group/message board and re-posted here so others can learn from it.

 

Categories: Home | Diet & Weight Management | Vitamins & Supplements | Herbs & Cleansing |

Sexual Health | Medifast Support | Nutrisystem Support | Medifast Questions |

Web Hosting | Web Hosts | Website Hosting | Hosting |

Web Hosting | GoDaddy | Digital Cameras | Best WebHosts |

Web Hosting FAQ | Web Hosts FAQ | Hosting FAQ | Hosting Group |

Hosting Questions | Camera Tips | Best Cameras To Buy | Best Cameras This Year |

Camera Q-A | Digital Cameras Q-A | Camera Forum | Nov 2010 - Cameras |

Oct 2010 - Cameras | Oct 2010 - DSLRs | Oct 2010 - Camera Tips | Sep 2010 - Cameras |

Sep 2010 - DSLRS | Sep 2010 - Camera Tips | Aug 2010 - Cameras | Aug 2010 - DSLR Tips |

Aug 2010 - Camera Tips | July 2010 - Cameras | July 2010 - Nikon Cameras | July 2010 - Canon Cameras |

July 2010 - Pentax Cameras | Medifast Recipes | Medifast Recipes Tips | Medifast Recipes Strategies |

Medifast Recipes Experiences | Medifast Recipes Group | Medifast Recipes Forum | Medifast Support Strategies |

Medifast Support Experiences |

 

(C) Copyright 2010 All rights reserved.