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Help needed with indoor shots
Hello, i've been asked to do the candid evening shots at a wedding but haven't a clue where to start as I only ever shoot sportsI wil be using a 1D MKII N and I have the 50mm 1.8 and also 24-70 F2.8 with a 550 flash (which I haven't used before).Any help and advice would be greatly appreciatedThanks..

Comments (11)

Use your flash. If you can, bounce it or use a diffuser. Use slower shutter speeds to get some ambient exposure if you can. Try dragging the shutter too. This can give you interesting results on the dance floor..

'I reject your reality and substitute my own' -Adam Savage..

Comment #1

Here are some flash techniques employed by a wedding photographer:.

Http://planetneil.com/...lash-photography-techniques/1-natural-looking-flash/.

(hope it helps... sorry if this is too basic for you)..

Comment #2

Believe me nothing is too basic, and what does dragging the shutter mean.Cheers..

Comment #3

To my very basic knowledge, it means using a slow shutter speed. In the sample photos of the man leaning on the lamppost, he used a 1/15 shutter speed as opposed to his apprentice using 1/60. The slower shutter speed allowed more ambient light, which improved the lighting ratio. Similar logic for the picture with the man in the hallway..

Do note that if you're going to do this, you'll may need to use gels (color for your flash) to match the ambient light. Otherwise, the difference in the temperature of the ambient light vs. flash will be apparent, as in the (otherwise good) picture in the hallway..

(P.S.The correct gel color is the one that matches the color of the ambient light. For example, green for fluorescent. When both the flash and ambient light are the same color, then you can correct the white balance for both light sources uniformly. I have no experience using gels myself so you may want a second opinion.).

(Anyone correct me if anything here is wrong...)..

Comment #4

What sort of settings should I be starting with..

Comment #5

I believe the author of that site had 2 basic suggestions depending on the brightness of the background compared to the subject - see question 1 on this page http://planetneil.com/.../flash-photography-techniques/3-dragging-the-shutter.

Summary - If the background is brighter than the subject, meter for the background, then use the flash to illuminate the subject. If the background and subject are just as bright, then underexpose 1.5 to 2 stops, then use flash to illuminate your subject...

Comment #6

Firstly my appologies for being so thick on the sbject but fast sports outside seem a lot easier. What do ineed to be setting the camera on (ie) manual, TV or AV ??..

Comment #7

I use P and M (see below). I'm sure there's a more efficient way to do this but I just had my k100d for a week before having to send it for an exchange, so I hadn't had time to experiment with it's controls. These are the steps I take with my p&s:.

Method 1: metering for the background, using flash for the subject..

A. Metering for the background: I go to Program mode, turn off the flash, switch to center or spot metering (not evaluative), aim at the background, half-press the shutter release to get the program exposure settings for the background..

B. Using the flash for the subject: I switch to manual and using the same exposure settings from above, I focus on the (now underexposed) subject, then I take the shot with the flash on..

C. If the shot doesn't look good, then I adjust either the exposure or the flash compensation to get it right. Adjusting the exposure will control the amount of ambient light. Adjusting flash compensation will control the subject's exposure (because it's being illuminated primarily by the flash)..

Method 2: underexpose by 1.5-2 stops, then use flash for the subject.

A. I go to program mode, I go to Program mode, turn off the flash, switch to center or spot metering (not evaluative), aim at the subject, half-press the shutter release to get the program exposure settings..

B. Using the flash for the subject: I switch to manual, increase the shutter speed by 1.5-2 stops, I focus on the (now underexposed) subject, then I take the shot with the flash on..

C. If the shot doesn't look good, then I adjust either the exposure or the flash compensation to get it right. As above, adjusting the exposure will control the amount of ambient light and adjusting flash compensation will control the subject's exposure (because it's being illuminated primarily by the flash)..

P.S. I'm assuming you're not the main photographer for this wedding, in which case, would it be feasible to ask the main photographer if you could act as his apprentice for this shoot (in exchange for his training / tips, possibly lending you equipment)? Of course I would get the bride and groom's consent before approaching the photographer with this proposal...

Comment #8

Go buy a Gary Fong Lightsphere, cloud model..

Specific versions fit specific flash units, so get the right one..

I assume we're talking about walking around snapping pictures of two, thre, four, five people in groups, drinking and chatting, at this wedding. Not real wedding photos..

Set the camera on M for manual. Set the shutter speed to 1/200 of a second. Set the aperture to f8..

Use the 24-70mm lens.

Set the flash, assuming it's a good one, to zero flash exposure compensation..

Set the flash to E-ttl or i-TTL.

Zoom your lens so that when you have the choice of being a few feet away, or ten feet away, you choose the closer of the two..

Get the people close together, and have then turn toward the camera. Gaps between people are ugly and they fool the flash system. BAcks of heads make for lousy photos, plus they insult the people who you obviously did not think were important..

Get the people lined up so they are all about the same distance from the camera. Otherwise the near people will be too bright and the far ones too dark..

Determine in advance final print size. If all you are shooting is 4x6, you can fill the frame, but if people are going to want 8x10 prints common at weddings make sure you leave enpty space at the edge of the frames to accomodate the height to width ratio..

Don't forget to allow time between pictures for the flash to recharge properly..

BAK..

Comment #9

CreaDVty wrote:.

C. If the shot doesn't look good, then I adjust either the exposureor the flash compensation to get it right. Adjusting the exposurewill control the amount of ambient light. Adjusting flashcompensation will control the subject's exposure (because it's beingilluminated primarily by the flash)..

Just a correction/clarification to the above: to adjust exposure only for the ambient light, you do so by adjusting shutter speed (because adjusting aperture and/or ISO will affect both ambient light and the subject's exposure by the flash, whereas changing shutter speed will not really affect the flash illumination of the subject)...

Comment #10

BAK wrote:.

Set the camera on M for manual. Set the shutter speed to 1/200 of asecond. Set the aperture to f8..

Set the flash, assuming it's a good one, to zero flash exposurecompensation..

Set the flash to E-ttl or i-TTL.

BAK.

I often read advice like this, but I don't understand it..

I rarely shoot indoors, so bear with me. I understand that when in manual mode, you select the aperture that you want, focus on the subject and dial in the shutter speed so that the exposure meter pointer is centred in the viewfinder. if speed is too slow for the chosen aperture, open up the lens or raise ISO to suit. Now I would assume that whatever new subject you point at, you could simply adjust the shutter speed to keep the pointer in the centre of the scale to maintain correct exposure..

The bit I don't understand is shooting indoor manual. Camera settings are often suggested as above, but there is never any mention of using the exposure meter to verify the correct exposure for the subject, or any mention of keeping the meter centred..

Does the exposure meter not have any relevence when shooting indoors, or am I just missing something obvious. I have also read many times where folks choose an initial setting and shoot all evening without change, regardless of whether the subject is light or dark.Can someone explain..

Allan-UKEOS 1D III+EOS 1DIIN+ EOS 20DFuji S602Z+TCON-17+TL-FX9 +WL-FX9All the gear.........No idea...

Comment #11

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This question was taken from a support group/message board and re-posted here so others can learn from it.

 

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