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help me straighten the buildings(panorama) (1 image)
Can you please help me look at that image I took yesterday, it's a panorama, made up of 8 other images..

I have Photoshop cs2, but cannot work out how to straighten the buildings, they look like Tower-of-Pisa-wannabe..

Can anybody tell me how to straighten it?.

Feel free to work on the image itself too..

Thank you!.

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Suehttp://picasaweb.google.com/silvia.simeonovahttp://photo.net/photos/xilin_best.

Every picture is a story in waiting...

Comments (12)

I believe that you would use the "Perspective Tool" in the "Transform Menu" to straighten the buildings. At least that is what I would use in PSE5..

This was done very fast and dirty. I did take just a bit of each side of the picture off and reduced the overall size just for posting reasons..

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Ron.

Let's Rollhttp://smg.photobucket.com/albums/v105/ront1/Canon%20S3IS/http://www.pbase.com/ront/root..

Comment #1

Couldn't be easier. Convert the background to a layer (double-click background in the Layers palette; then Transform (Ctrl-T) and drag the corners (various combinations of Ctrl-, Alt- and Shift-drag are useful - read the Help) until you get something like this:.

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Try to keep the overall height/width in proportion, as indicated by the centre grab-handles which should stay roughly on the existing edges of the frame..

Another option is to choose Edit ~ Transform ~ Perspective but I don't like the way it makes it hard to maintain proportions (and impossible unless you make the image smaller in both directions) so I use Ctrl-T which is a freeform transform, along with Ctrl-Alt-Shift-drag - but do try both..

It is best to do this before framing, of course - use the entire uncropped output from your pano software, then crop to a rectangle after transforming...

Comment #2

I'll work today on the original image!.

Thank you very much for the advice and help!!:):)Suehttp://picasaweb.google.com/silvia.simeonovahttp://photo.net/photos/xilin_best.

Every picture is a story in waiting...

Comment #3

Suexilin wrote:.

Can you please help me look at that image I took yesterday, it's apanorama, made up of 8 other images.I have Photoshop cs2, but cannot work out how to straighten thebuildings, they look like Tower-of-Pisa-wannabe..

Fixing this image will render it much less a "pano" than you wanted, because after correcting the perspective, it will have to be cropped heavily..

I think the "problem" needs to be fixed earlier in the process..

Can you describe how you took the pix...what camera, the orientation of the camera (ie, landscape or portrait), did you use a tripod, did you use a pano head, what software did you use to stitch the 8 images together?.

The most obvious thing is that the horizon is not straight! This can happen when you don't level the camera. You may have had the camera pointed up too much?.

If you would reduce the original pix a bit and post them, I might be able to suggest more or even show you how to stitch them better..

Charlie DavisNikon 5700 & Sony R1HomePage: http://www.1derful.infoBridge Blog: http://www.here-ugo.com/BridgeBlog/..

Comment #4

Chuxter wrote:.

Suexilin wrote:.

Can you please help me look at that image I took yesterday, it's apanorama, made up of 8 other images.I have Photoshop cs2, but cannot work out how to straighten thebuildings, they look like Tower-of-Pisa-wannabe..

Fixing this image will render it much less a "pano" than you wanted,because after correcting the perspective, it will have to be croppedheavily..

I think the "problem" needs to be fixed earlier in the process..

Can you describe how you took the pix...what camera, the orientationof the camera (ie, landscape or portrait), did you use a tripod, didyou use a pano head, what software did you use to stitch the 8 imagestogether?.

Hi, Charlie,thank you !.

I was standing on a pedestrian bridge over the street, my camera is Fuji s8000, from the left end of the bridge I took 2 pictures ( with the grid lines enabled on my camera LCD, tried to align the horizon with them) then lifted up the camera and took 2 pictures with mostly sky and the same buildings in it, this time aligning the buildings with the grid lines..

Then I moved to the right end of the bridge, and took another square of 4 photos, two with mostly street and buildings then 2 with mostly sky and buildings..Came home and loaded them up in PTGui, and it suggested this panorama..

I have the originals, and will post them here tomorrow resized..

Thanks again!.

If you would reduce the original pix a bit and post them, I might beable to suggest more or even show you how to stitch them better..

Charlie DavisNikon 5700 & Sony R1HomePage: http://www.1derful.infoBridge Blog: http://www.here-ugo.com/BridgeBlog/.

Suehttp://picasaweb.google.com/silvia.simeonovahttp://photo.net/photos/xilin_best.

The world I see is not the same as yours,I take pictures so I can show you mine...

Comment #5

Suexilin wrote:.

Hi, Charlie,thank you !I was standing on a pedestrian bridge over the street, my camera isFuji s8000, from the left end of the bridge I took 2 pictures ( withthe grid lines enabled on my camera LCD, tried to align the horizonwith them) then lifted up the camera and took 2 pictures with mostlysky and the same buildings in it, this time aligning the buildingswith the grid lines.Then I moved to the right end of the bridge, and took another squareof 4 photos, two with mostly street and buildings then 2 with mostlysky and buildings..Came home and loaded them up in PTGui, and it suggested this panorama..

I have the originals, and will post them here tomorrow resized..

Thanks again!.

In CS2, another way is select Filter > Distort > Lens Correction, it gave me this after 1 min's work. Not sure whether it's better than other methods, but certainly seems easier..

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But as someone else said, the shot needs adjusting earlier..

RegardsAlex.

Http://alexandjustine.smugmug.com/..

Comment #6

Suexilin wrote:.

Came home and loaded them up in PTGui, and it suggested this panorama..

If you are using any of the advanced tools including PTGui, you should specify "vertical guides" or "vertical control pairs" to help the stitcher know what should appear vertical in your finished panorama. To specify a single guide, you mark two points on a vertical feature, such as the bottom and the top of the same edge of a wall. Specifying two such guides or pairs will fix most panoramas like yours. Ready your PTGui documentation on this..

[ e d @ h a l l e yc c ] http://www.halley.cc/pix/..

Comment #7

Suexilin wrote:.

I was standing on a pedestrian bridge over the street, my camera isFuji s8000, from the left end of the bridge I took 2 pictures ( withthe grid lines enabled on my camera LCD, tried to align the horizonwith them) then lifted up the camera and took 2 pictures with mostlysky and the same buildings in it, this time aligning the buildingswith the grid lines..

The "proper" way is to level the camera and never change that orientation. Even if you do them handheld, the camera orientation (rotationally around the lens axis) should not vary..

Then I moved to the right end of the bridge, and took another squareof 4 photos, two with mostly street and buildings then 2 with mostlysky and buildings...

Whoa! You did what? Never, ever move even a few inches! I cant believe that you got the 2 groups of pix to stitch together!.

Came home and loaded them up in PTGui, and it suggested this panorama..

I have the originals, and will post them here tomorrow resized..

Great. After seeing them, perhaps I will understand? .

Charlie DavisNikon 5700 & Sony R1HomePage: http://www.1derful.infoBridge Blog: http://www.here-ugo.com/BridgeBlog/..

Comment #8

Haha, it seems I have broken all the rules of making a panorama :).

I wanted to try .

Here go all the 8 images, resized to 800pixels.If they are too small, i'll resize them bigger..

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Thanks for helping me with this!!Suehttp://picasaweb.google.com/silvia.simeonovahttp://photo.net/photos/xilin_best.

The world I see is not the same as yours,I take pictures so I can show you mine...

Comment #9

Chuxter wrote:.

The "proper" way is to level the camera and never change thatorientation. Even if you do them handheld, the camera orientation(rotationally around the lens axis) should not vary..

Again, if you're using a real panoramic optimizer (PTGui included), and not just the one-row-only cheap stitcher programs or Photoshop alone, then the "proper" way is far more flexible..

With the good software, shooting a 2x2 square is fine. Each shot can be level, not level, twisted sideways, twisted diagonally, or whatever. The software really doesn't care because it corrects for pitch, yaw and roll in every shot. Generally, one should take care to pivot the camera in place* for all shots in a single panorama, but there are rules and then there are rules. Shooting two separate 2x2 squares at opposite ends of a bridge is a bit hard to stitch into one composition but it would be a fun challenge..

* for many near-range objects, pivot around the exit pupil of the lens; for long-range landscapes and cityscapes, it's much more forgiving of handheld technique.

[ e d @ h a l l e yc c ] http://www.halley.cc/pix/..

Comment #10

Suexilin wrote:.

Haha, it seems I have broken all the rules of making a panorama :).

Hey, that's a good place to start. When you learn what the rules are and start following them, making panos is a lot of fun..

I wanted to try .

Here go all the 8 images, resized to 800pixels.If they are too small, i'll resize them bigger..

Http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v80/xilin/DSCF2419.jpghttp://img.photobucket.com/albums/v80/xilin/DSCF2418.jpghttp://img.photobucket.com/albums/v80/xilin/DSCF2417.jpghttp://img.photobucket.com/albums/v80/xilin/DSCF2415.jpghttp://img.photobucket.com/albums/v80/xilin/DSCF2414.jpghttp://img.photobucket.com/albums/v80/xilin/DSCF2413.jpghttp://img.photobucket.com/albums/v80/xilin/DSCF2411.jpg.

The size is fine, but there are only 7...it seems that DSCF2412 or DSCF2416 is missing..

You also violated another rule: You didn't lock the exposure. Each pic is exposed differently. I took 3 of the first pix and stitched them with PTgui. Here is what I got:.

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Note the "seam" that is visible down the middle of the street. There are some "ghost" cars (because they moved). The cars on the left side of the street are all "ghosts" because they were not in the two right-hand pix..

But notice that the horizon is straight. The buildings have perspective distortion, but not too much...it was easily improved with PSE5:.

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I notice that the buildings all point in different directions. This is probably due to your lack of camera control...the camera MUST stay in one place during all the pix!.

A 2-row matrix of pix is difficult. Start with something simpler like a basic 1-row pano. You need to try this:.

1. Get and use a cheap tripod that will "pan". Level the tripod so that the camera will follow the horizon. You can also use a monopod...put the bottom on the ground and rotate around the pod tube, keeping it vertical to the ground. Or you can tie a string to the camera (make a loop and put it around the lens) and put a heavy weight on the bottom of the string (the weight is a "bob"). Keep the "bob" located over one spot on the ground and you rotate the camera..

2. Mount the camera in portrait orientation. Point it so that the horizon is in the center of view..

3. Find the brightest part of the scene and expose on that. Lock the exposure..

4. If there are moving objects in the scene, either wait until they are not moving (and take all the pix quickly) or better, wait until they are gone from the scene. If there are trees in the scene and if the wind is blowing, wait for another day!.

5. Overlap the pix about 25% to 30%..

If PTgui has difficulty finding control points, you did something wrong..

Charlie DavisNikon 5700 & Sony R1HomePage: http://www.1derful.infoBridge Blog: http://www.here-ugo.com/BridgeBlog/..

Comment #11

Ed Halley wrote:.

Chuxter wrote:.

The "proper" way is to level the camera and never change thatorientation. Even if you do them handheld, the camera orientation(rotationally around the lens axis) should not vary..

Again, if you're using a real panoramic optimizer (PTGui included),and not just the one-row-only cheap stitcher programs or Photoshopalone, then the "proper" way is far more flexible..

Yes, but the OP needs to learn the "right" way before she tries to break the "rules"..

With the good software, shooting a 2x2 square is fine. Each shot canbe level, not level, twisted sideways, twisted diagonally, orwhatever. The software really doesn't care because it corrects forpitch, yaw and roll in every shot. Generally, one should take careto pivot the camera in place* for all shots in a single panorama, butthere are rules and then there are rules. Shooting two separate 2x2squares at opposite ends of a bridge is a bit hard to stitch into onecomposition but it would be a fun challenge..

You might have fun with it!.

* for many near-range objects, pivot around the exit pupil of thelens; for long-range landscapes and cityscapes, it's much moreforgiving of handheld technique.

In the OP's composite, there were several near objects. I didn't (on purpose) bring up the idea that it is best to rotate the camera around a hidden axis, buried inside the lens. The name of that point is the "entrance pupil"...the "exit pupil" is on the other end of the lens, near the sensor. I also didn't mention that the "entrance pupil" moves as the lens is zoomed. I also didn't tell her how to locate the "entrance pupil". I didn't tell her about a "pano head" that allows the camera to be rotated about the "entrance pupil".



Charlie DavisNikon 5700 & Sony R1HomePage: http://www.1derful.infoBridge Blog: http://www.here-ugo.com/BridgeBlog/..

Comment #12

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