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Help for a beginner!
My husband and I would like to buy our first DSLR. Recommened to us has been the Canon 400D, and also the Olympus E-410. I've looked at the both of them and they both look good enough, but knowing nothing about these cameras it makes it hard!! having the liveview LCD screen on the Olympus - is this something we'd use a lot? seeing as the Canon doesn't have it..

We are willing to spend up to around $1500 (AUD) so any other recommendations, and also thoughts on these 2 camerars would be much appreciated!.

Thanks!..

Comments (28)

They are both excellent cameras, either would be good. The live view really isn't a big deal, especially since one of the main reasons for a dSLR is the through the lens, optical viewfinder..

You may also want to look at similar offerings from Pentax, Nikon, and Sony; although this may cloud the picture even more..

One big thing to look at is lens choice. If you have any idea what lenses you need, then this may well have more effect on your purchase than anything else. Canon and Nikon have a much wider selection of lenses available than other manufactures..

Brian A...

Comment #1

Thank you Brian!!.

I have just been looking at the Nikon D80 and the Sony A100 and am more confused than ever!!!! I really don't know much about lenses either...i'm a total beginner!!!..

Comment #2

I have just been looking at the Nikon D80 and the Sony A100 and ammore confused than ever!!!! I really don't know much about lenseseither...i'm a total beginner!!!.

Models to consider (in addition to the Oly E410 and Canon 400D/Xti) areNikon D40Pentax K100D.

The Nikon D80 is excellent but a step up in price and probably more camera than you need at the moment (although if you get keen you will start to find it's features useful in the future)..

The main thing to say is this: it doesn't really matter which one you get, as all are very good and do the same thing in the same way, and capable of producing excellent pictures. So from a 'quality' point of view don;t worry. Choose one that feels nice in your hands (an important consideration - e.g. people with large hands find some of the smaller models a bit fiddly) and you can be confident that it is a good choice..

All DSLRs come with a 'kit' lens, a standard zoom that covers roughly the range from miderate wide angle to moderate telephoto, and these are good general-purpose lenses. If you know you want something more specific, you can get the body only and a different lens in many cases E.g. if you want to take wildlife pictures or candid pics of kids from a distance you would be better off paying for a different lens with a longer telephoto reach. Some of cameras (especially Oly E410 and Nikon D40) do not (I think) sell the body separately, so you have to get the kit lens - but on these cameras it is cheap and good..

Best wishesMike..

Comment #3

... there are some technical differences between the cameras that it is worth knowing about..

1. Pentax K100D and Sony a-100 (and Olympus E510, the new one) have buit-in 'image stabilisation' which compensates for camera shake. As your hands wobble - which they always do - a sensor in the camera measures the motion and actually wobbles the sensor in the camera to compensate for your hand movements. The result is that you can take sharper pictures when using longer shutter speeds when otherwise camera shake would blur the shot. It was this that tipped my choice towards the Pentax K100D over the Nikon D40 at the same price, I can hand-hold pics indoors at 1/15 second exposure without problems..

2. Don't worry about the number of megapixels - it is of much, much less importance than salesmen would have you believe. Unless you plan to make enormous prints you won't see the difference, as even 6MP (the minimum you will get in a DSLR) provides more resolution than the eye can see even in big A3-sized prints. The quality of the lens is more important in getting well-resolved and sharp pictures. In many cases 6MP is actually better than 10MP, as these sensors perform better in low light, so if you want to take pictures indoors without flash, 6MP may give you a slight advantage. Don't worry about it either way - Just don't let a salesman talk you into paying extra for more megapixels unless the camera has other facilities that you want..

3. Lenses again... Canon and Nikon certainly have the widest range of lenses, with several esoteric (and very expensive) examples in addition to the commoner focal lengths. However unless you are a semi-pro or serious enthusiast who needs wide-aperture ultra-long tele lenses, or fisheye lenses etc. all camera makers have a good range of the commonly-used lens types which are more than enough for most people. Olympus have a very good 'twin lens' deal which gives you the camera body (E410 or E510) + standard zoom + telephoto zoom which will cover all you are likely to need for a while..

4. Bear in mind that you will need a photo-editing program like photoshop elements, and learning to use this is an important part of the whole process..

Best wishes (again)Mike..

Comment #4

It would probably help if we knew what type of pictures you are interested in taking. Family, kids sports, landscapes, night shots etc..

Mike..

Comment #5

Scotkat wrote:.

My husband and I would like to buy our first DSLR. Recommened to ushas been the Canon 400D, and also the Olympus E-410. I've looked atthe both of them and they both look good enough, but knowing nothingabout these cameras it makes it hard!!.

As others have correctly mentioned:.

1. There are other viable candidates you should consider.2. Ignore MP.3. Camera shape/size is VERY important...go hold them!.

Having the liveview LCD screenon the Olympus - is this something we'd use a lot? seeing as theCanon doesn't have it..

If you have used a camera with this feature, you will probably want it. However, be aware that some of these early dSLRs have poor Live View implementations. Live View on a camera with a mirror is quite different than Live View on a camera w/o a mirror. In a few years, these dSLR Live View designs will be much better..

We are willing to spend up to around $1500 (AUD) so any otherrecommendations, and also thoughts on these 2 camerars would be muchappreciated!.

Both your candidates are small cameras. I assume you and your husband have small hands? If so, also consider the Nikon D40, as it is small too, but generally has good ergonomics..

At your level of camera knowledge, don't fret about lenses. Get the "kit" lens that is bundled with the camera. Nikon, Olympus, and Pentax have better "kit" lenses than Canon..

Charlie DavisNikon 5700 & Sony R1HomePage: http://www.1derful.infoBridge Blog: http://www.here-ugo.com/BridgeBlog/..

Comment #6

BuffaloMike wrote:.

It would probably help if we knew what type of pictures you areinterested in taking. Family, kids sports, landscapes, night shotsetc..

Mike.

We have a one year old son so he would probably be our main focus for taking photos of!!! also would love to get into taking landscapes..

Thanks so much for everyone else's thoughts and advice, it's been really helpful..

Mike703 - I really appreciate all the info you gave, so do you currently use the Pentax K100D?.

This is so hard!! i'm indecisive at the best of times.....if someone could just tell me which one to buy that would help!!! lol...

Comment #7

If, as you say and sound, you really are a total beginner, do you need something as complicated as a DSLR?.

It really is a bit like buying a Masseratti, when all you really want is a VW Golf (or a Hyundai Accent)!.

Check out the many excellent (and far cheaper) point and shoots..

If in, say two years time, photography has really grabbed you, you can splurge on a DSLR, with another two years of experience (and research) under your belt..

Just a thought...

Comment #8

Mikelis wrote:.

If, as you say and sound, you really are a total beginner, do youneed something as complicated as a DSLR?.

It really is a bit like buying a Masseratti, when all you really wantis a VW Golf (or a Hyundai Accent)!.

Check out the many excellent (and far cheaper) point and shoots..

If in, say two years time, photography has really grabbed you, youcan splurge on a DSLR, with another two years of experience (andresearch) under your belt..

Just a thought..

Yeah, a very valid point....but my husband and I are both really interested in photography and therefore would like something more than just the "point and shoot" camera (which although it isn't the best camera, we already have one of those!!) thanks though for your thoughts ..

Comment #9

Scotkat wrote:.

Mikelis wrote:.

If, as you say and sound, you really are a total beginner, do youneed something as complicated as a DSLR?.

It really is a bit like buying a Masseratti, when all you really wantis a VW Golf (or a Hyundai Accent)!.

Check out the many excellent (and far cheaper) point and shoots..

If in, say two years time, photography has really grabbed you, youcan splurge on a DSLR, with another two years of experience (andresearch) under your belt..

Just a thought..

Yeah, a very valid point....but my husband and I are both reallyinterested in photography and therefore would like something morethan just the "point and shoot" camera (which although it isn't thebest camera, we already have one of those!!) thanks though for yourthoughts .

Please tell us what P&S camera you currently have. The range of differences between what is called "P&S" is MUCH greater than in the dSLR realm. There really are more types of cameras than just these 2! My personal list of camera types is: Phone, Pocket, Consumer, Amateur, Prosumer, Bridge, Small SLR, Entry SLR, Semi-Pro SLR, Pro SLR, & Medium Format. Note that I don't mention a "P&S" type..."Point and Shoot" is a style of camera operation, not a camera type. ALL cameras can be used in the "P&S" mode!.

If you have a Consumer camera, upgrading to a Prosumer or Bridge might be a good choice..

Charlie DavisNikon 5700 & Sony R1HomePage: http://www.1derful.infoBridge Blog: http://www.here-ugo.com/BridgeBlog/..

Comment #10

My classification of point-and-shoot (including pro-sumers/bridge) vs DSLR was along the lines of:.

Point and shoot: you get one do-all lens, you have in-camera macro, you have a short "movie mode", you have on-board cropping, you don't need post-production. You can do all your printing at a kiosk. Little hassle, little bucks..

DSLR: you have lenses, lenses, lenses, usually a suit-case full (eventually). If you want to do macro, you need another (very expensive) lens. Generally, you're into post-production and all that entails (why else bother with DSLR?). You will probably end up with a printer and all that entails. Big hassle, big bucks..

It's quite amusing/instructive to read on this website the number of posts by DSLR owners looking for a good compact to use because they're fed up with messing about with their DSLRs...

Comment #11

Chuxter wrote:.

Please tell us what P&S camera you currently have. The range ofdifferences between what is called "P&S" is MUCH greater than in thedSLR realm. There really are more types of cameras than just these 2!My personal list of camera types is: Phone, Pocket, Consumer,Amateur, Prosumer, Bridge, Small SLR, Entry SLR, Semi-Pro SLR, ProSLR, & Medium Format. Note that I don't mention a "P&S" type..."Pointand Shoot" is a style of camera operation, not a camera type. ALLcameras can be used in the "P&S" mode!.

If you have a Consumer camera, upgrading to a Prosumer or Bridgemight be a good choice..

Charlie DavisNikon 5700 & Sony R1HomePage: http://www.1derful.infoBridge Blog: http://www.here-ugo.com/BridgeBlog/.

I'm embarassed to admit it's only a 2MP Kodak camera!!!!! we bought it years ago and it's really done it's job well, and does take surprisingly decent photos - well, decent enough to put into photo frames which is all we wanted it for at the time..

I just really like the thought of getting into photography - getting a good camera, software, taking a few lessons, etc. So just thought a DSLR was the way to go?..

Comment #12

Mikelis wrote:.

My classification of point-and-shoot (including pro-sumers/bridge) vsDSLR was along the lines of:.

Point and shoot: you get one do-all lens, you have in-camera macro,you have a short "movie mode", you have on-board cropping, you don'tneed post-production. You can do all your printing at a kiosk.Little hassle, little bucks..

DSLR: you have lenses, lenses, lenses, usually a suit-case full(eventually). If you want to do macro, you need another (veryexpensive) lens. Generally, you're into post-production and all thatentails (why else bother with DSLR?). You will probably end up witha printer and all that entails. Big hassle, big bucks..

It's quite amusing/instructive to read on this website the number ofposts by DSLR owners looking for a good compact to use becausethey're fed up with messing about with their DSLRs.

So from this post, can I assume you're not keen on DSLRs? or wouldn't recommend them?!!!..

Comment #13

Not exactly..

I think that DSLRs, the best of them, are the acme (the summit) of photographic wizardry. However, that does not mean that everybody needs to have one, not more than everone NEEDS a Cadillac, Rolls-Royce, or Masseratti. If you make a living from photography, such as a professional wedding photographer, photojournalist, or some such, and can make use of all the wonderful potential built into such cameras and lenses, sure, go for it. But for the rest of us, the expense and trouble (and lack of talent) would not justify such expense..

OK, in the next line, we have a variety of cheaper and nastier DSLRs. Still expensive, but -other than being "DSLRs"- not distinguishably better than the "point and shoots". In fact, in certain aspects not even as good as..

So why bother?.

OK if it's your all-consuming passion, and you want to spend your days doctoring some second-rate shot into something "better", but I'd rather take photos than spend my time in doctoring weak shots that should have been put out of their misery in the first place..

My attitude would be: take a better shot to begin with. I.e. ditch it and try again..

But....each to his own poison, I guess..

You "pays the money and takes your choice"..

Comment #14

All very valid points, and I appreciate you taking the time to tell me your point of view. So, if I wasn't to get a DSLR what other camera would you recommend?!!..

Comment #15

There you've got me!.

First, since you present camera is a 2mp job, all of the recent crop of 6 to 8mp cameras will be a noticeable improvement: better batteries, bigger lcds, higher resolution etc..

The first thing you should consider is what you will be using your camera for most of the time..

If only to record your life and times and take some scenery, the odd sunset and macro of a flower (or to record your valuables for insurance purposes) a 7 to 8 mp 3x compact will be ideal. A 1gb card will give you about 250 shots, and the built- in rechargeable lithium battery will last all weekend. It will be very transportable and handy. However, many of these do not have an optical viewfinder, and you will certainly find one very useful in bright/sunny outdoors situations. Beware of superzooms in that the greater the magnification, the greater the "camera shake" effect. Even though many now come with "image stabilization", that comes with an image quality cost.

Not necessarily the hypothetical best, but a good practical compromise: I'm very happy with it..

Not entirely content with that, I also lashed out for a "prosumer". Prosumers combine most of the features of the DSLRs (except for multiple lenses and the size of the sensor -influencing shutter lag and ISO noise free levels) and the compacts in a single package. The shortcoming here is the lack of an opticlal viewfinder (most having electronic viewfinders of varying qualities). My prosumer is a Samsung Pro-815. Aggain, I'm -overall- very happy with it. However, it is noticeably bulkier than the Sony (compact) and therefore not as "handy".



I also have a number of film point and shoots, range-finders, and slrs. all of which get regular "outings..

The point of all this is:.

Make a list of essential attributes, then use the "camera search" forum on this website, then read up the prospects on Google, then inspect in a shop. Time your purchase to coincide with a run-out of the model you're intersted in.

Good luck!..

Comment #16

Thanks so very much Mikelis - lots of info for me to take on board (and take back to my husband!) looks like we have a lot of deciding to do between now and when we choose a camera..

Really do appreciate it, thanks again ..

Comment #17

Scotkat wrote:.

BuffaloMike wrote:.

It would probably help if we knew what type of pictures you areinterested in taking. Family, kids sports, landscapes, night shotsetc..

Mike.

We have a one year old son so he would probably be our main focus fortaking photos of!!! also would love to get into taking landscapes..

Thanks so much for everyone else's thoughts and advice, it's beenreally helpful..

Mike703 - I really appreciate all the info you gave, so do youcurrently use the Pentax K100D?.

This is so hard!! i'm indecisive at the best of times.....if someonecould just tell me which one to buy that would help!!! lol..

I am partial to my 6mp Pentaxes but any camera made today or even last 3 years or so will be fine...you just have to try them all (as many as you can get your hands on) and see what YOU prefer..

If you had specific needs then some would be better than others for THOSE specific needs....ie Canon for motor sport etc..

All the Pentax 6mp cameras make great entry cameras with the added bonus of being good at low light ( the10mp K10d is a better camera but only does 1600 iso).

In your case I would get as inexpensive camera as you can and as good a lens(es) as you can. The reason for this is image quality camera for camera is pretty much the same...it is the lens that really does it, the better the camera the more bells and whistles toGET the photo....NOT better photos, so by getting a better lens with a cheaper camera you will get better pics (than a dearer camera with cheaper lens) and then when ready to upgrade in a year or 2 (which you would anyway most likely) you have some decent glass..

I did everything WRONG in this shot with my K100d and Tamron 17-35 2.8-4...would have been better to put it on full auto...it is taken wide open...which I normally have to use for music pics...but for landscaapes????.

From Ubirr rock, Kakadu, Australia last week auto levels only in photoshop 4.

Image control:Zoom outZoom 100%Zoom inExpand AllOpen in new window.

This is the sunset at Darwin last week taken with an old freebie tamron adaptall lens. Auto levels only in ps4 (cropped slightly to get under 5mb for flickr)...and I know there is a dust spot...removed with vaccuum cleaner today. A better lens would have been much better....but for free I kinda like it...I should have taken a better lens tele wise but wanted to travel light and not worry...oh well next time..

Image control:Zoom outZoom 100%Zoom inExpand AllOpen in new window.

Neil.

Link back to flickrhttp://www.flickr.com/photos/26884588@N00/..

Comment #18

I just really like the thought of getting into photography - gettinga good camera, software, taking a few lessons, etc. So just thought aDSLR was the way to go?.

It is, if you want to have the possibility to take more control of the camera and possibly expand the system as your experience increases..

You can set a DSLR to 'fully auto' (P) mode and use it like an oversized point-n-shoot, and the metering is sufficiently clever these days that it will do a good job in most lighting situations. As you learn more you can start to experiment with the aperture- and shutter-priority and manual modes..

In response to your earlier question: yes I do use the Pentax K100D, which I am very happy with. There are plenty of very happy Nikon D40, Olympus E410 and Canon 400D owners out there as well, most of whom will be happy to recommend that you get what they've got... The Nikon D40 has a good reputation as an easy-to-use camera that delivers excellent image quality and has a comprehensive 'help' feature built in, so you can ask the camera for advice if you want! I wasn't so bothered about that as I have a lot of experience with shooting 35mm SLR cameras so I know the basics, and for me, the image stabilisation of the Pentax K100D at the same price as the Nikon D40 was the deciding factor. The best thing to do is find a shop that will let you handle them and have a play..

Best wishesMike..

Comment #19

I just purchased a Rebel XTi about 2 months ago. Am still in the learning phases from my point and shoots, and my children are now 11 and 7. Just a thought. I wish I had dove into the DSLR years ago. I have always been interested in photography, but went the easy route with P&S. Now looking back wish I would've invested earlier.

The great thing about this camera is that it can be put on auto mode as you begin and grow with you as you learn more and use the other modes. If you are interested in photography anyways I would say invest now and let the camera and lens collection grow with you and your family. Definitily start with a basic lens like the kit lens if you are unsure of your main subject is for shooting. I have learned quickly with basic, cheaper lenses and taken good pics. I am now knowing what lenses I need and why.

Don't want to diss P&S cameras, they are great and photos are an expensive hobby as I am finding out creating my lens want list. So if needs are general and you just want a good camera easy to run go with p&s. It is fun to learn DSLR, if you are interested, esp with kids. Just some thoughts from a beginner myself who has just changed over!! Good Luck!Julie..

Comment #20

My first DC was a 1.1MP Kodak. It was stolen and I bought a 1.3MP Kodak. I still have it. These cameras and probably yours are "Consumer" cameras...simple, basic cameras. My next camera was a Nikon CP 5700...a "Prosumer". Lots of control, good IQ, slow.

It "bridges" the void between dSLRs and all the lesser cameras. It has great IQ, good control, and is much faster than the "Prosumer" 5700. It's been OOP (Out of Production) for a year and still there are misguided fanatics who believe that the R1 has better IQ than any other camera!.

Http://forums.dpreview.com/...forums/read.asp?forum=1009&message=24748282.

It DOESN'T have the greatest IQ in the world, but it's very close. If your subject is well illuminated, isn't moving REALLY fast, or isn't up too close, a "Bridge" camera like the R1 will take wonderful pix!.

Unfortunately, all the construction of "bridges" on the "P&S" side of the void has ceased. "Prosumers" are history. All the "bridge" construction is on the dSLR side of the void. My my count, there are now 11 "bridge" cams...the R1 (which was a Prosumer with an APS-C sized sensor and STUNNING Carl Zeiss lens) and 10 Bridge dSLRs (which are dSLRs with Live Preview)..

You might want to read this:.

Http://www.here-ugo.com/BridgeBlog/?page_id=11.

It will help you sort out the various things that affect IQ..

You might especially notice the table about 60% of the way down. It shows the characteristics of the various types of cameras. You may indeed want to look at some "Prosumers", although there are few of them left anymore. Many manufacturers want you to get a Small/Entry SLR, as that has taken the place in the market of the Prosumer/Bridge cams..

IMPORTANT: Get a camera that fits your hands! If your husband has big hands and you have small hands, get 2 cameras!.

Scotkat wrote:.

Chuxter wrote:.

Please tell us what P&S camera you currently have. The range ofdifferences between what is called "P&S" is MUCH greater than in thedSLR realm. There really are more types of cameras than just these 2!My personal list of camera types is: Phone, Pocket, Consumer,Amateur, Prosumer, Bridge, Small SLR, Entry SLR, Semi-Pro SLR, ProSLR, & Medium Format. Note that I don't mention a "P&S" type..."Pointand Shoot" is a style of camera operation, not a camera type. ALLcameras can be used in the "P&S" mode!.

If you have a Consumer camera, upgrading to a Prosumer or Bridgemight be a good choice..

Charlie DavisNikon 5700 & Sony R1HomePage: http://www.1derful.infoBridge Blog: http://www.here-ugo.com/BridgeBlog/.

I'm embarassed to admit it's only a 2MP Kodak camera!!!!! we boughtit years ago and it's really done it's job well, and does takesurprisingly decent photos - well, decent enough to put into photoframes which is all we wanted it for at the time..

I just really like the thought of getting into photography - gettinga good camera, software, taking a few lessons, etc. So just thought aDSLR was the way to go?.

Charlie DavisNikon 5700 & Sony R1HomePage: http://www.1derful.infoBridge Blog: http://www.here-ugo.com/BridgeBlog/..

Comment #21

Dear Chuxster,.

Thanks for the teriffic link to sensors etc..

What the guy seemed to be almost saying is that Bridge Cameras (because of the short back-focusing, are the way to go -if you want good IQ?.

Interesting!.

Perhaps the "EVIL" camera is closer than we think?..

Comment #22

Mikelis wrote:.

Dear Chuxster,.

Thanks for the teriffic link to sensors etc..

You are welcome..

What the guy seemed to be almost saying is that Bridge Cameras(because of the short back-focusing, are the way to go -if you wantgood IQ?.

Yes, that's what he is clearly saying..

Interesting!.

I agree. And provocative too! This fact is sadly under-reported and understood. It contributes heavily to WHY a P&S/prosumer can have IQ that approaches an expensive dSLR (all P&S cameras have short-back-focus lenses)..

Perhaps the "EVIL" camera is closer than we think?.

With the rash of dSLRs bridging the "gap" by including "Live View", formerly the property of P&S cameras, we are getting closer. Did you notice that the new Nikon D300 will also have "Contrast AF" as an option?.

What you missed, I think, is that "the guy" is me... .

Charlie DavisNikon 5700 & Sony R1HomePage: http://www.1derful.infoBridge Blog: http://www.here-ugo.com/BridgeBlog/..

Comment #23

Dear Chuxster,.

Wow! Good article, very informative and well written! I'm sorry I didn't make the connection: no offence intended..

PS,.

Re "excellent IQ on compacts", I keep looking at the prints I get from my Sony DSC W-100, and I keep thinking, how can anything be better than these? They beat my Canon EOS50 (film) shots (using mid-range lenses) hollow..

BTW, could another (fourth?) factor in IQ be the printer, if the final image is the print? (Just being pedantic?)..

Comment #24

Scotkat wrote:.

My husband and I would like to buy our first DSLR. Recommened to ushas been the Canon 400D, and also the Olympus E-410. I've looked atthe both of them and they both look good enough, but knowing nothingabout these cameras it makes it hard!! having the liveview LCD screenon the Olympus - is this something we'd use a lot? seeing as theCanon doesn't have it..

LiveView in it's current implementation on a DSLR has limited utility. Image stabilization is something you're more likely to get benefit from..

Pentax and SONY have stabilization built into the camera body (in that they stabilize the sensor), so you'll get stabilization on any lens you chose to buy..

Canon and Nikon eliminate camera shake by having more usable high ISO settings..

So where in the SONY you might choose ISO 400 and a stabilized shutter speed of 1/15 second, with the Canon you might choose a faster shutter speed of 1/60 second combined with a higher ISO of 1600, and get away without having to buy a stabilized lens..

The problem with buying a stabilized lens rather than a stabilized sensor is that not all lenses are available in a stabilized version, and those that are, cost more than their non-stabilized brothers..

We are willing to spend up to around $1500 (AUD) so any otherrecommendations, and also thoughts on these 2 camerars would be muchappreciated!.

I'd recommend that you start with an entry level camera and a single mid-range zoom, say something that covers 18-200mm..

Use the automatic settings first, including jpg. As you become familiar with the camera, you can begin to experiment with changing the settings, and with RAW, which requires additional software to "develop" the image..

In other words, take it one step at a time and don't worry about expensive software like Photoshop until much later..

A DSLR will give you a number of benefits over a P&S..

- A P&S has a longer shutter lag, so when you're taking a picture of your child at just the right moment, the P&S may actually miss that moment, where the DSLR's faster shutter will likely capture it..

- A DSLR gives you the option of putting a distracting background out of focus, making the subject of your photo stand out better..

- DSLRs are more versatile. Over time you'll grow to appreciate the capabilities more and more..

Fiat Lux..

Comment #25

Mikelis wrote:.

Dear Chuxster,.

Wow! Good article, very informative and well written! I'm sorry Ididn't make the connection: no offence intended..

Yes, I knew you were innocent. I was just having fun with you... .

PS,.

Re "excellent IQ on compacts", I keep looking at the prints I getfrom my Sony DSC W-100, and I keep thinking, how can anything bebetter than these? They beat my Canon EOS50 (film) shots (usingmid-range lenses) hollow..

Your W-100 has a short-back-focus lens. Your Canon EOS50 doesn't..

BTW, could another (fourth?) factor in IQ be the printer, if thefinal image is the print? (Just being pedantic?).

YES! The printer, ink, and paper is VERY important. Also the "profile" used to communicate with the printer can make a difference..

What printer do you use? What paper do you use?.

Charlie DavisNikon 5700 & Sony R1HomePage: http://www.1derful.infoBridge Blog: http://www.here-ugo.com/BridgeBlog/..

Comment #26

Dear Charlie,.

I must admit that in technical matters I am a "total innocent". I simply take the shots (film or digital) and have them processed (6x4s only) at the corner store..

(I don't own any programmes or printers).

But, I'm very happy with the results i've been getting from the Kodak kiosks (I understand it's a dye sublimation process using Kodak everything).

I know some people prefer Fuji. Perhaps I was just unlucky, but when I tried Fuji, I got this strong pink colour cast all over everything and haven't gone back..

Essentially, I'm only a "happy snapper", but I am trying to improve my results constantly, within my narrow, self-imposed, "genre". Hence my presence on this forum and my interest in (an appreciation of) your article...

Comment #27

Hold on now! Are you a "total innocent" or a "happy snapper"? You can't have it both ways. .

The pink Fuji was probably misadjusted?.

Thanks again for the kind words....

Mikelis wrote:.

Dear Charlie,.

I must admit that in technical matters I am a "total innocent". Isimply take the shots (film or digital) and have them processed (6x4sonly) at the corner store..

(I don't own any programmes or printers).

But, I'm very happy with the results i've been getting from the Kodakkiosks (I understand it's a dye sublimation process using Kodakeverything).

I know some people prefer Fuji. Perhaps I was just unlucky, but whenI tried Fuji, I got this strong pink colour cast all over everythingand haven't gone back..

Essentially, I'm only a "happy snapper", but I am trying to improvemy results constantly, within my narrow, self-imposed, "genre".Hence my presence on this forum and my interest in (an appreciationof) your article..

Charlie DavisNikon 5700 & Sony R1HomePage: http://www.1derful.infoBridge Blog: http://www.here-ugo.com/BridgeBlog/..

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