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Help a Newbie Get his Ball Rolling!
Hi All,.

First I will give you an introduction..

I am a newbie to photography. I have always regular Cameras (currently own a Sony T-100). Even with those basic cameras I put all the settings on Automatic, Point, and Shoot!.

But recently I have decided to start a new hobby. Photography. And I am planning to buy a new professional camera, not to specialize in photography or anything, just as a hobby. I am satisfied with my current profession!.

What I am interested in shooting is generally Buildings, nature, Exhibitions that I usually visit (Cars, Boats, etc). And maybe the kids at home. I also would like to shoot tiny objects like ants and water drops. Maybe also take pictures of objects with focus/blur effects to differentiate the objects from the surroundings..

So after this introduction here are my questions:.

1- I know that this has been asked 100000 times. But I want to make sure that I pick the camera that is suitable for my needs and preferences. Which do you recommend for a beginner with the interests mentioned above? I want to use this camera in the coming 3 years and have it grow with me. I want something standard that I can buy lenses for easily and upgrade easily. please mention the brand, model, and why do you recommend it..

2- Will I need a course or something? I hate to take courses. I prefer books and videos. So should I start that before buying? Or I can buy a camera then start learning using it? Will I be able to use a professional camera straight out of the box to point and shoot images with quality better than what I get on normal basic cameras?.

3- Lenses, will I get free lenses with my camera or I will need to buy some with it?.

4- Do you recommend any websites, books, DVDs, or youtube videos for me to start learning from? Any particular tutorials?.

5- Any other tips and suggestions? Any do's and don'ts?.

Thanks all..

VidER.

I Shoot for Fun!..

Comments (16)

I think it's going to be tough to help without knowing a budget as well as know how you define "Professional.".

Given my definitions and budget and given that I'm biased towards the very best (grin), I suggest the Nikon D300. It's around $1800 and can be described as "professional level" or prosumer. With this camera you could pretty much expand into this hobby with a plethora of lenses and assessories growing as you need to. The D300 will work with little modificaton with most all Nikkor lenses going back to 1959..

As a first lens, I would suggest the Nikkor 16-85mm VR. This moderate zoom goes from fairly wide angle to somewhat telephoto, including portrait ranges. The Vibration Reduction is a nice feature as well. It's a new lens but is testing out superb optically with initial reviews..

For close-up work, I'd suggest the older 60mm f2.8 Micro Nikkor. This lens is legendary sharp and fun to use at around $385. If you want more reach, the Nikkor 105 VR Micro is more expensive..

For a longer telephoto zoom, depending on your budget, I'd suggest the 70-300vr at around $500 or the 70-200vr at $1600..

Again, all this is just speculation without knowing your definition of "professional" and your budget..

One last thing, and I will cause ire with the owners of other brands. You said you wanted a system to grow into and I agree. IMO, only Nikon and Canon offer a large enough system of lenses, equipment, rental centers, service centers, dealers, books, and other items to support a growing and expanding hobby..

The Canon 40D would be another camera I might suggest that meets my criteria, but I don't know enough about Canon glass to comment, besides Nikon glass is superb..

Just my 2 cents...

Comment #1

VidER wrote:.

What I am interested in shooting is generally Buildings, nature,Exhibitions that I usually visit (Cars, Boats, etc)..

For these subjects you may find an ultra-wide zoom most useful. The one exception is that if "nature == wildlife", then you need a good telephoto..

And maybe the kids at home..

For this you probably want a fast aperture lens - at least f/2.8 and better f/2 or lower..

I also would like to shoot tiny objects like ants andwater drops..

For ants/water drops you'd want a dedicated macro lens. For the larger insects/flowers you can often get by with the "macro mode" on the commn zooms..

Maybe also take pictures of objects with focus/blureffects to differentiate the objects from the surroundings..

That's back to the fast lens of f/2.8 or better..

1- I know that this has been asked 100000 times. But I want to makesure that I pick the camera that is suitable for my needs andpreferences. Which do you recommend for a beginner with the interestsmentioned above?.

Your preferences are common ones. Any of the current DSLR brands will meet these needs. (One exception: Nikon D40/60 are limited in faster than f/2.8 lens options.).

For availability, it depends on where you live. Generally it's easiest to find Canon and Nikon..

2- Will I need a course or something? I hate to take courses..

You might instead join your local camera club..

So should I start that before buying?.

You can start learning with your current camera. It might help you think about what you like/dislike in a camera. Most of photogtaphy is basics like light and composition. Better cameras just make it easier..

Will I be able to usea professional camera straight out of the box to point and shootimages with quality better than what I get on normal basic cameras?.

Yes and no. All better cameras also have PhD modes (Push Here Dummy.) However, they do not always "cook" the images as much for punch/sharpness/saturation. So you may find that you need to do more experimentation with the settings and/or post-processing on the computer. The reason for this is that one size does not fit all. You need to season to taste..

3- Lenses, will I get free lenses with my camera or I will need tobuy some with it?.

They are not "free" but the kit with a lens or two s typically less than the cost of buying separately..

4- Do you recommend any websites, books, DVDs, or youtube videos forme to start learning from? Any particular tutorials?.

For general advice, I've always like the Kodak tips:http://www.kodak.com/...c/PageQuerier.jhtml?pq-path=38/39&pq-locale=en_US.

Erik..

Comment #2

Buy a Canon 350D body This is a great beginner's dslr and costs less than $400. Couple this body with a Canon 18-55mm f/3.5-5.6 IS lens. This is a nice general purpose lens (much better than the kit lens) and only costs about $175. Simultaneously, buy the web-based version of "The Complete Guide to Canon's Digital Rebels," by Gary Friedman. This costs about $25 and consists of 470 pages of helpful information about your new camera, about photographic principles, and about getting the most out of your camera. Total cost thus far, about $600.

However, expect to spend a lot more in the coming year!.

Jerryhttp://jchoate.zenfolio.com/..

Comment #3

1/ Ignore all advice recommending a specific camera brand.It is biased.All the major brands make acceptable entry level DSLRs.Canon and Nikon are the largest and probably with good reason.The rest are playing catch up but that doesnt mean they should be ignored..

2/Give Olympus a miss for the momentThey make great cameras and lenses but use a quirky 4/3rds system that you may come to regret when you develop and grow into your hobby.Sorry all you Oly fans-Harsh but true.On the other hand if it's for you then great as they have some great lenses in their back catalogue..

3/Most important-go into a camera shop-explain your needs and handle a few cameras.How the camera feels to you is really important.For example a camera like the Canon 400D may seem small and awkward-but add a battery grip and it is transformed.So play with a few cameras and their accessories and find one you like..

4/There are loads of books many of which have been mentioned on this site-read them it will help.Also for Canon and Nikon cameras there are model specific DVD/Videos that will take you through the complete operating procedure and menu system of the camera coupled with shooting and general photographic advice.Great value for about 25..

5/Dont be afraid to shoot in auto when you starttake as many pics as you can-just have fun getting the feel of the camera.Read the manualRead it again keep it in your camera bag-read it again.Then try out AV and TV modesHey you are on your way.Who cares about the mistakesShoot as much as you can and then shoot some more.6/Above all have fun and E N J O Y7/Same as 6 above E N J O Y.

PJT..

Comment #4

PJT:.

The person who initiated this thread requested specific info (what camera, what lens, and how to learn to use it). I provided that information. Had I known of a Nikon, Pentax, Olympus, or whatever rig that was inexpensive AND had an excellent book for nuubs, I would have mentioned it as well. Your response ("There are loads of books....") was not especially helpful..

Jerryhttp://jchoate.zenfolio.com/..

Comment #5

One other problem is that the OP mentioned "professional camera" several times. I know that most people answered with starter kits. He might be referring to all DSLRs as "professional" or maybe he really meant professional..

That's why I mentioned the D300 and the 40D. A budget might be helpful...

Comment #6

Good point. However, I interpretted his reference to himself as a nuub and his requesting info on how to learn basic photography as meaning that what he really wanted was info on an introductory dslr with which he could grow. If I misinterpretted the situation, I apologize..

Jerryhttp://jchoate.zenfolio.com/..

Comment #7

Thanks guys..

I have gone through all your replies and will take notes of them soon..

Just to make things clearer. I am a real newbie. I have no idea what an aperture is and I had to use spell check to write it right. I am not asking for a definition here. I am just telling you not to take my words literally because I have no clue what I am talking about!.

What I meant by "Professional Camera" is those "professional looking" cameras that look different than the little basic compact cameras. I meant those cameras with the lens sticking out. Cameras with that classic camera look. All in black. With manual focus and telescopic zoom. I was not referring to SLR or DSLR because I have no clue what are those!.

I am learning from scratch. I bought a book using terms that I never heard before. And realized that the book was not for beginners as it claims. I want to start with the most basic terms. With definitions. What is what and what is it useful for and why does a camera have one of those!.

As for the budget, I did not mention it because I had no idea how much such cameras would cost. For me it could have ranged from $100 to $1000..

But $1000 seems a good maximum budget for me..

This brings me to a question, Do those cameras have year models?.

Like is there anything as the (2008 Canon)? Is it wise to "Wait for the 2009 Nikon Collection"?.

Thanks for your time and kindness guys. I really appreciate your help..

Someday I will share my professionally taken photos with you .

VidER.

I Shoot for Fun!..

Comment #8

I can offer my small opinion as I'm a complete newbie too!.

Last week I purchased a Canon 400D ( Digital Rebel XTI in the US) because I share the same ambitions as yourself!.

Basically for around 500 euros / 790 USD I got Camera with Lens included and the ability to be able to pick it straight from the box and start shooting. At the moment I am only using the standard shooting modes, those being Portrait, Landscape, Sports, Nighttime and close up because all the other modes are currently as clear as mud! I'm satisfied with it after the first week and look forward to learning all the things that come with it!.

I bought this camera because of the price and functions it had for a beginner but also because there is a good range of lenses available to me when and if I need them. According to a lot of people here in the Canon section most people tend to agree that for a starter this camera is a good place to start..

I'd def. advise finding somebody to help understand the functions and be able to point you in the right direction concerning that actual photos you're taking .. maybe there are people local to you on this forum who can help! I've actually made friends with the sales assistant who sold me mine haha so I hope to be able to show you what he's taught me soon..

I hope this has at least answered / helped you a tiny bit!.

Mark..

Comment #9

Wombat 52 wrote:.

2/Give Olympus a miss for the momentThey make great cameras andlenses but use a quirky 4/3rds system that you may come to regretwhen you develop and grow into your hobby.Sorry all you Olyfans-Harsh but true.On the other hand if it's for you then great asthey have some great lenses in their back catalogue..

That's an ignorant statement. there is nothing quirky about 4/3rd's and there would be nothing to regret pursuing this direction..

The e510 2 lens kit allows the OP coverage from 28-300mm in 2 lenses, 10mp, in body image stabilization, pixel mapping, dust reduction that actually works as opposed to anything from nikon/canon, live view, best kit lenses out there to start with, fantastic lens upgrade path, all for $650 leaving money for a shoe mounted flash, tripod and CF cards and a bag for the OP's budget to complete the beginner's kit..

It's the best value going, it has great image quality, 10mp, all the features to allow a self admitted newb come to grips with a dslr and the option to go full manual after leaning as bit..

For a sub $1k budget you can't do any better than the e510 to cover the entry to mid level camera segment. the lens path alone makes it worth signing on to Oly equipment..

Regardless of what you buy OP, go to a camera shop and handle whatever camera you are considering as if it doesn't feel good in hand you aren't going to use it..

They are all good photographic tools in this market segment, they all have their own strengths, the e510 IMO is the best balance of all of it for the money and would serve a newb quite well for a long time..

E1 w/ grip, e510, e300 w/ grip, 8mm FE, 14-54mm, 35mm, 50mm, 40-150mm,50-200mm, fl-50, fuji - 6800..

Comment #10

VidER wrote:.

What I meant by "Professional Camera" is those "professional looking"cameras that look different than the little basic compact cameras. Imeant those cameras with the lens sticking out. Cameras with thatclassic camera look. All in black. With manual focus and telescopiczoom. I was not referring to SLR or DSLR because I have no clue whatare those!.

There are two possible types of cameras you could be referring to:.

1. The cameras with interchangeable lenses. These are the DLSR or "digital single lens reflex" cameras like the Nikon D60, Canon 450D, Pentax K10D, Olympus E510, Sony A200. They all have large sensors, top quality, and fast performance. You typically look through an optical viewfinder that uses a mirror to route the view through the lens. Some of them are now offering a "live view" mode that can use the rear LCD like a regular digital camera.



Examples:http://www.dpreview.com/reviews/nikond60/http://www.dpreview.com/reviews/olympuse510/http://www.dpreview.com/reviews/canoneos400d/.

2. The "superzoom" or "bridge" camera like the Fuji S8000 or Panasonic Lumix DMC-FZ18. These often look like a small DSLR but have a single integrated lens. This lens typically covers a large zoom range, larger than any single lens on a DSLR. However, they have smaller sensors and thus noisier output particularly in less than sunny lighting. The eye level viewfinder is a small LCD and they can also use the rear LCD..

Examples:http://www.dpreview.com/reviews/olympussp560uz/http://www.dpreview.com/reviews/fujifilms8000fd/http://www.dpreview.com/reviews/panasonicfz18/.

Basically, you are trading versatility (and price) for convenience. With a superzoom you will never have to change lenses, but it will be more difficult for you to take best quality extreme closeup photos (like insects) and indoor candids. With a DSLR you will have to buy more pieces and possibly carry more gear, but you can equip it to take any imaginable type of photo..

But $1000 seems a good maximum budget for me..

This budget would easily buy you an entry level DSLR and one or two lenses or a bridge camera..

This brings me to a question, Do those cameras have year models?.

No. They just have model numbers. Most DSLRs are updated (and get a new model number) ever 18-24 months. Most bridge cameras are updated every 12-18 months..

Erik..

Comment #11

Ya know. If anyone mentions that the Olympus 4/3 mount is anything but good, the Oly fans come out with the name-calling. He said Olympus made good lenses. He just thinks the sensor is too small and Oly is locked into it. I agree. Sorry.

It's a great camera, but that small sensor is not going to compete in the long run, IMO..

If you have Olympus, enjoy it. They're good cameras. The lenses, for the most part, are very good. Some can be a bit expensive and the only way to get really wide is $1600. But, they're good..

I just personally woundn't recommend it for the long haul. A lot of others agree. So throw rotten tomatos at me. ..

Comment #12

Ya know....

The first thing that most people say around here to an admitted newb looking to get through the entry dslr mire is to discount anything not canon or nikon just because they are the big two..

Next pat answer buy an xti or a d40 + a marginal kit lens or 2 for $500-$700, show happiness to the class and post the DOF special photo of such wonders as a pen, button, beer bottle, blah, blah, blah 50mm f1.8 picture as a first picture out of the shiny new box post because the 50mm is the bargain of all that is photography..

And BTW save up for a 5d because you'll be growing out of the xti/d40 in no time because the world is going full frame if you haven't heard..

And for the finale top it off with a little 4/3rds is an evolutionary dead end not because it's been proven so but simply because my opinion means more than multiple billion dollar corporations investing in it's future and because I say so..

You'll note not once have I ever said any of those weren't options, I am simply of the opinion there are other better options for the newb, his intent, and his budget all the while the rest of the forum community has ample opportunity to state their opinions otherwise..

The OP has no professional aspirations, he wants a hobby and wants a kit for <$1000 for shooting outdoors, macro and general shooting as he states clearly..

How is the e510 kit not appropriate for this OP? because you and others said so based in little or no experience in some instances? $650 gets the 2 lens kit, $200 gets the 35mm macro lens, $125 gets you a fl36 shoe flash used and $25 gets you a CF card of 2gb, add another $5 for a 4gb card if you catch a sale..

Tell me how 4/3rds is any less quirky than asp-c, would asp-c be quirkier or not quite as quirky if the bench mark is the 35mm standard. 4/3rd gives a bit of high ISO away to asp-c, that's it, period, nothing else. I trust you have been saying 4/3rd is a dead end like they have been saying since it's introduction. I'd argue otherwise. the e3 is a match for a d300 save higher ISO and the Oly lenses are more than a match for anything being produced by Canon/Nikon. So your point is simply to impose a personal opinion that Olympus isn't a viable option.



It gets tiring to hear that the 4/3rd sensor is not a viable path forward, it is IMO, and others far more qualified than mine, and has yet to be proven otherwise as it's still around. The last I knew no one around here had the crystal ball clearly telling us all something otherwise..

Simply no one asked you or anyone without experience with one to recommend it as I wouldn't of the others available. What gets a little old is the disparaging remarks that usually precede Oly references by people who haven't used them which I also haven't taken part in..

E1 w/ grip, e510, e300 w/ grip, 8mm FE, 14-54mm, 35mm, 50mm, 40-150mm,50-200mm, fl-50, fuji - 6800..

Comment #13

Freealfas wrote:.

Wombat 52 wrote:.

2/Give Olympus a miss for the momentThey make great cameras andlenses but use a quirky 4/3rds system that you may come to regretwhen you develop and grow into your hobby.Sorry all you Olyfans-Harsh but true.On the other hand if it's for you then great asthey have some great lenses in their back catalogue..

That's an ignorant statement. there is nothing quirky about 4/3rd'sand there would be nothing to regret pursuing this direction..

The e510 2 lens kit allows the OP coverage from 28-300mm in 2 lenses,10mp, in body image stabilization, pixel mapping, dust reductionthat actually works as opposed to anything from nikon/canon, liveview, best kit lenses out there to start with, fantastic lens upgradepath, all for $650 leaving money for a shoe mounted flash, tripod andCF cards and a bag for the OP's budget to complete the beginner's kit..

It's the best value going, it has great image quality, 10mp, all thefeatures to allow a self admitted newb come to grips with a dslr andthe option to go full manual after leaning as bit..

For a sub $1k budget you can't do any better than the e510 to coverthe entry to mid level camera segment. the lens path alone makes itworth signing on to Oly equipment..

Regardless of what you buy OP, go to a camera shop and handlewhatever camera you are considering as if it doesn't feel good inhand you aren't going to use it..

They are all good photographic tools in this market segment, they allhave their own strengths, the e510 IMO is the best balance of all ofit for the money and would serve a newb quite well for a long time..

E1 w/ grip, e510, e300 w/ grip, 8mm FE, 14-54mm, 35mm, 50mm, 40-150mm,50-200mm, fl-50, fuji - 6800.

Nothing ignorant at all just an honest opinion to somebody buying their first DSLR.The 4/3rds and 2X crop doesnt appeal to everybody and it hasn't made inroads into the pro market which is almost exclusively Canon and Nikon.Olympus hasn't exactly made a major impression at entry level DSLR either (just look at the sales figures on this site).Now Olympus make good cameras and good lenses as I mentioned in my earlier post-so I suspect their lack of popularity has less to do with their quality and more to do with the system which when compared to the other major manufacturers is different or as I put it quirky.I didnt knock Olympus-I just didnt recommend it.Would I recommend a different/quirky system to a newbNO. You have invested in Olympus because you like it and it suits you.Well thats terrific and I am really glad you enjoy your system that is as it should be.But compared to the conventional Full frame,1.6 & 1.5 crop DSLR market the Oly market share is tiny and for good reason.By all means feel free to recommend your system -that is as it should be-we all have different opinions.But to call someone ignorant because they have a different opinion to your own is both rude and unnecessary.PJT..

Comment #14

Nothing ignorant at all just an honest opinion to somebody buyingtheir first DSLR.The 4/3rds and 2X crop doesnt appeal to everybodyand it hasn't made inroads into the pro market which is almostexclusively Canon and Nikon..

The OP is looking for a basic starter kit for a budget, e510 and upgrade path more than fits the bill..

Olympus hasn't exactly made a majorimpression at entry level DSLR either (just look at the sales figureson this site).Now Olympus make good cameras and good lenses as Imentioned in my earlier post-so I suspect their lack of popularityhas less to do with their quality and more to do with the systemwhich when compared to the other major manufacturers is different oras I put it quirky..

Where is the system lacking, great cameras, great lenses, brought to market most of the features canon and nikon are just now adopting in their latest cameras, the only thing lacking is marketing not the system. Where's the quirk? How is a 2x equivalency factor any more or less quirky than the commonly revered 1.5 or 1.6x equivalency factor just because it has been adopted by canon and nikon therefor it must not be quirky because it sells a lot or simply because you say so..

I didnt knock Olympus-I just didnt recommendit.Would I recommend a different/quirky system to a newbNO. Youhave invested in Olympus because you like it and it suits you.Wellthats terrific and I am really glad you enjoy your system that is asit should be..

Quirky reads as a negative connotation regardless of the positive qualifiers you offered. You don't have to recommend them, that's not the point, my point is why throw terms like quirky out at all? what's the point, it's simply inaccurate..

But compared to the conventional Full frame,1.6 & 1.5crop DSLR market the Oly market share is tiny and for good reason..

What reason would that be other than your opinion, they give up a bit of higher ISO, that's it, period, so what, not every picture is taken at ISO94857000 as much as one would lead a newb to believe around here..

Byall means feel free to recommend your system -that is as it shouldbe-we all have different opinions.But to call someone ignorantbecause they have a different opinion to your own is both rude andunnecessary..

I didn't call you ignorant, I called the statement out as ignorant as it simply holds no factual basis. I'm all for you/anyone having an opinion and expressing it with supporting facts based in experience/reference with a product, that's the point of this place, but to term it quirky with nothing more than anecdote is simply poor form..

E1 w/ grip, e510, e300 w/ grip, 8mm FE, 14-54mm, 35mm, 50mm, 40-150mm,50-200mm, fl-50, fuji - 6800..

Comment #15

Freealfas wrote:.

Nothing ignorant at all just an honest opinion to somebody buyingtheir first DSLR.The 4/3rds and 2X crop doesnt appeal to everybodyand it hasn't made inroads into the pro market which is almostexclusively Canon and Nikon..

The OP is looking for a basic starter kit for a budget, e510 andupgrade path more than fits the bill..

Olympus hasn't exactly made a majorimpression at entry level DSLR either (just look at the sales figureson this site).Now Olympus make good cameras and good lenses as Imentioned in my earlier post-so I suspect their lack of popularityhas less to do with their quality and more to do with the systemwhich when compared to the other major manufacturers is different oras I put it quirky..

Where is the system lacking, great cameras, great lenses, brought tomarket most of the features canon and nikon are just now adopting intheir latest cameras, the only thing lacking is marketing not thesystem. Where's the quirk? How is a 2x equivalency factor any moreor less quirky than the commonly revered 1.5 or 1.6x equivalencyfactor just because it has been adopted by canon and nikon thereforit must not be quirky because it sells a lot or simply because yousay so..

I didnt knock Olympus-I just didnt recommendit.Would I recommend a different/quirky system to a newbNO. Youhave invested in Olympus because you like it and it suits you.Wellthats terrific and I am really glad you enjoy your system that is asit should be..

Quirky reads as a negative connotation regardless of the positivequalifiers you offered. You don't have to recommend them, that's notthe point, my point is why throw terms like quirky out at all?what's the point, it's simply inaccurate..

But compared to the conventional Full frame,1.6 & 1.5crop DSLR market the Oly market share is tiny and for good reason..

What reason would that be other than your opinion, they give up a bitof higher ISO, that's it, period, so what, not every picture is takenat ISO94857000 as much as one would lead a newb to believe aroundhere..

Byall means feel free to recommend your system -that is as it shouldbe-we all have different opinions.But to call someone ignorantbecause they have a different opinion to your own is both rude andunnecessary..

I didn't call you ignorant, I called the statement out as ignorant asit simply holds no factual basis. I'm all for you/anyone having anopinion and expressing it with supporting facts based inexperience/reference with a product, that's the point of this place,but to term it quirky with nothing more than anecdote is simply poorform..

E1 w/ grip, e510, e300 w/ grip, 8mm FE, 14-54mm, 35mm, 50mm, 40-150mm,50-200mm, fl-50, fuji - 6800.

Q.E.D. Quirky-get over it and dont be so sensitive.Deal in facts.Your system is not popular.That does not make it badJust unpopular.As before ,glad you like it-If it is that goodI am sure it will take over the world in the next few months and every other manufacturer will go bust.As I stated Oly make good cameras and good lenses.Your system is differentGet a life and accept that,it is not for everybodySo somebody on a forum didnt recommend youSO WHAT!!! Nobody is insulting your purchase.I used to like Oly SLRs.Zuiko lenses are generally superb.Your DSLR system is fine- It just doesnt cut it with the vast majority of the DSLR buying public.Thats a matter of taste and choiceand fact!!.

This thread should not be hi-jacked by sensitive Oly users.Go back to the original post and give an opinion that hopefully will help the OP,if that is pro Oly then fine.My opinion remains the sameI would not recommend Oly to a newb.PJT..

Comment #16

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