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Flare? (1 image)
Hi there. I shot this one last week and was surprised to see some flare on it (see left of the building with the red sign).

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I'm using a clear UV filter with a 28-80 lens (Nikon D80). Is the UV filter causing the flare?.

To avoid, just remove the filter?.

Thanks..

Comments (18)

No flare. Think it's out of focus and you're seeing nice bokeh..

Comment #1

Mmm...I've got the original 10 MP file and it is in focus. The "flare" is to the left of the tall building with the red sign on the centre of the pic. They look like two smallish lights floating on the air...

Comment #2

I see what you are talking about but I'm not sure it's any kind of lens flare. Could it be some dust? Did you have any shots with the same thing after/before you took this one. On a shot this long any dust on the filter or between the filter and the camera could cause problems..

Sometimes you can get reflections in a UV but that is not often if you have a decent filter. In which case taking it off will obviiously eliminate the problem..

If you take this type of shot again increase your apature some and decrease the ISO. Since this was a 15 sec shot you obviously used a tripod so there is no need to use ISO 400 or an f16 setting. Just a suggestion..

Maddog.

Olympus E-500, Olympus E-510..

Comment #3

Ok, I see now what you mean, but have no idea.Mean time I sharpened your pic..

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Comment #4

It definitely looks like flare to me. The softness is likely caused by the small aperture used - sharpness will degrade from around F/9 on a D80..

Here's a link to explain a little more:http://www.vanwalree.com/optics/filterflare.html.

Hope this helps,GordonGordon SolomonAssistant technical writer, dpreview.com..

Comment #5

That's the UV filter, most likely..

Some lenses are prone to flare so it always could be in the lens but it's more commonly the UV filter.A member of the rabble in good standing..

Comment #6

OK, trying to learn a bit here If it's flare, shouldn't it be consistent throughout the picture instead of 2 faint dark blobs/ghosts? And there is also a fairly noticeable difference between the original and the sharpened one. I am wondering if the camera was 100% steady. This is a bit like playing detective fun...

Comment #7

Debruyne wrote:.

OK, trying to learn a bit here If it's flare, shouldn't it beconsistent throughout the picture instead of 2 faint darkblobs/ghosts? And there is also a fairly noticeable differencebetween the original and the sharpened one. I am wondering if thecamera was 100% steady. This is a bit like playing detective fun..

No, filter flare is not consistant across the frame. It usually seen in the center of the frame and not at the periphery of the picture. This is because the flare is caused by the reflection of light from the front element of the lens and the back of the filter. Because the front element of most lenses is curved the only flare seen will be in the middle of the picture..

Camera shake on the other hand will be uniform across the picture as all parts of the image "shake" equally..

Clear as mud?A member of the rabble in good standing..

Comment #8

Edit: LM2 has explained this quicker than I could .

Debruyne wrote:.

OK, trying to learn a bit here If it's flare, shouldn't it beconsistent throughout the picture instead of 2 faint darkblobs/ghosts? And there is also a fairly noticeable differencebetween the original and the sharpened one. I am wondering if thecamera was 100% steady. This is a bit like playing detective fun..

There are many different types of flare. The type you are referring to is veiling flare which does indeed affect the entire image. In this case the 'ghost' image is caused by the lights atop the building just to the right of and below the centre of the image (assuming the shot was not cropped which I don't believe it was)..

Here's another link if you're interested in the different types of flare and their effects. Notice the shot of Brighton pier and the way the 'ghost' image appears reversed and shifted an equal distance from the centre of the image - just like Ronan's shot..

Http://www.vanwalree.com/optics/flare.html.

GordonGordon SolomonAssistant technical writer, dpreview.com..

Comment #9

Right, I got it. Opposite the center of the (lens)/ picture the 2 bright blue lights on the roof are the source...

Comment #10

Mmm....Interesting point about aperture and ISO. I'll try the same shot again with no filter and say maybe f8 or a bit lower and see what happens. Yes, shot was taken on a tripod, but it was windy so it could have moved a bit around..

Thanks to all !. This forum is just amazing......

Comment #11

Debruyne wrote:.

Right, I got it. Opposite the center of the (lens)/ picture the 2bright blue lights on the roof are the source..

Almost... the two bright white lights on the roof immediately right of center are the source. Draw lines vertically and horizontally through the center of the photo and you'll see the flare perfectly mirrors them both vertically and horizontally.Some cool cats that can use your helphttp://www.wildlife-sanctuary.org.

Even if you can't donate, please help spread the word...

Comment #12

Sorry to dig this one out. Took another picture without the uv filter and larger aperture:.

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- Flare is gone- Image is sharper- Still not entirely happy with it, but a little better.

Cheers..

Comment #13

Well done Ronan!.

You say you're not entirely happy with it and I suspect that is to do with the residual flare around the lights. If you fancied one more try I'd recommend shooting a little earlier - usually the hour immediately following sundown is best - when there is more ambient light. This will drop the contrast of the scene and help to prevent the lights overexposing. Give it a try and you'll soon see why people refer to it as 'magic hour'..

Hope this helps,.

GordonGordon SolomonAssistant technical writer, dpreview.com..

Comment #14

Big improvement..

The take-away knowledge is that the flare that you can see at night so easily is the loss of contrast that you can't see in your daytime shots. Put that UV filter away and only get it out to protect the front element against blowing rain or sand. Otherwise just leave it in the bag and protect the front element with your lens hood.A member of the rabble in good standing..

Comment #15

This was taken about 20 mins earlier.....

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Plenty more ambient light to capture..

Two questions:.

- As I said, I'm still not happy with my 2nd image, the reason being that there is a lot of residual light behind the city. I want to see the city line against the pitch black sky. I know that can be done in PP, but is there a way to capture that in the shot?.

- What sort of white balance should be used in this case?. I tried daylight - which produces a more "yellowish" image and "auto" which produced a more "blueish" image. What would you recommend?.

Thanks..

Comment #16

It could be flare, and it could be caused by the UV filter. (One reason why I NEVER use a filter, I use Lens Hood instead.).

BUT ... it could also be a "reflection" from your sensor to the rear-element of your lens, (and back again). Supposedly the "dx" lenses have anti-reflection coatings on the rear-elements to reduce that problem..

So WHAT lens are you using ??? And older design or a new "dx" version ???.

Ronan_M wrote:.

Hi there. I shot this one last week and was surprised to see someflare on it (see left of the building with the red sign).

Image control:Zoom outZoom 100%Zoom inExpand AllOpen in new window.

I'm using a clear UV filter with a 28-80 lens (Nikon D80). Is the UVfilter causing the flare?.

To avoid, just remove the filter?.

Thanks.

Thanks for reading .... JoePhoto.

( Do You Ever STOP to THINK and FORGET to START Again ??? )..

Comment #17

I like this one a lot... but what do I know!  ryanrtxtx..

Comment #18

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This question was taken from a support group/message board and re-posted here so others can learn from it.

 

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