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Dust Management technology (is it important)
All, I am researching the purchase of my first Digital SLR. I am looking at the entry level and entry level plus e.g. Nikon D40x -d80 Canon XT-XTI.

My question: I have noticed some systems, Cannon, Olympus, Sony etc have technology to minimize dust on the sensor. How important is this if you are carefull and leave the lens on the body most of the time?.

Put another way is this an important enough diferientiator to stear away from the Nikon and move to the Canon/sony or pentax?.

Thanks for your help!..

Comments (7)

Nube wrote:.

All, I am researching the purchase of my first Digital SLR. I amlooking at the entry level and entry level plus e.g. Nikon D40x -d80Canon XT-XTIMy question: I have noticed some systems, Cannon, Olympus, Sony etchave technology to minimize dust on the sensor. How important isthis if you are carefull and leave the lens on the body most of thetime?.

Not very, unless you're shooting in rather adverse environments or combine high-volume shooting and a sharp dislike for regular maintenance work such as cleaning the sensor/filter array in which case finding out that you've got dust spots on several hundred images taken during the day might be rather aggravating..

I would regard such factors as ergonomics and appropriate features/lenses for the task as far more important..

Put another way is this an important enough diferientiator to stearaway from the Nikon and move to the Canon/sony or pentax?.

Considering that the Canon, Sony and Pentax dust-removal systems don't actually work all that well, not very. Nikon has introduced a version on their latest models, but AFAIK it remains to be seen whether their implementation is effective..

Http://pixinfo.com/en/articles/ccd-dust-removal/..

Comment #1

If your camera doesn't have a dust shaker (or the dust shaker doesn't work very well) you will most likely need to get some sort of sensor cleaning equipment (I use something called an arctic butterfly). it doesn't take long to clean the sensor once you get the hang of it although there can be some sticky dirt that you either live with or go to a wet (not dry) cleaning method..

If you shoot at f22 all the time you will see a lot more dust in your pictures than if you are always shooting at f4..

Even if you don't change lenses some debris can come from inside the camera or in theory can be sucked in by zoom lenses..

I can say that the dust shaker on my old olympus e-300 works great. Have heard mixed opinions about the canon version...

Comment #2

I've had my dSLR for three years, and have only had a few dust-bunnies.I simply used the rocket-blower to clear them out..

While in-camera sensor-cleaning is a nice touch, I would NOT use it as the sole criteria.Plus, IMVHO, it is one-more thing to go wronf (sic)Warm regards,DOF..

Comment #3

Nube wrote:.

All, I am researching the purchase of my first Digital SLR. I amlooking at the entry level and entry level plus e.g. Nikon D40x -d80Canon XT-XTIMy question: I have noticed some systems, Cannon, Olympus, Sony etchave technology to minimize dust on the sensor. How important isthis if you are carefull and leave the lens on the body most of thetime?.

Dust happens. It will happen even if you never change lenses (via the zoom)..

But IMHO it doesn't happen very often. I've used a DSLR with a single (zoom) lens (no lens changes) for about 9 months - no dust - and with a second lens (multiple lens changes) for a further 4 months - no dust. At least, no dust that I've detected, maybe if I went looking for it....

...and that's the other point, a couple of dust spots that never show up (because they are lost in the complexity of the picture, or the print isn't big enough, or whatever) don't count. A dust spot you don't see isn't a dust spot..

To hear some people (camera makers) talk about dust removal systems, you'd think that (eg) Nikon users are fighting a constant battle with dust ruining their photos, cleaning their sensors with expensive cleaning kits every second day, etc..

If you observe simple good practice when changing lenses, and you don't shoot in extremely advers conditions, I see no reason why dust should be such a big issue that you should put dust removal systems near the top of your priority list..

Put another way is this an important enough diferientiator to stearaway from the Nikon and move to the Canon/sony or pentax?.

No. IMHO. There are many more important factors..

Image control:Zoom outZoom 100%Zoom inExpand AllOpen in new window..

Comment #4

When the dust buster stops working, what's the worst that can happen? You have to get out the rocket blower? Really not much of a downside is it?.

That said, if all other things were equal, take the camera with a working dust buster (the Olympus, the others are all wanna-bes). But of course all things are never equal. Each manufacturer has strengths and weaknesses and you'll just have to pick your poison. They're all capable of great pictures.A member of the rabble in good standing..

Comment #5

It's a nice bonus but not one that makes a camera without it useless..

I don't have it on my D80 but it will be a nice thing to have when I get a D300..

You just have to be aware that dust can be an issue and I suggest these..

Keep your camera and lens body clean, brush them down after a shoot with a paintbrush (don't clean the lens element with the brush) and with a good blower..

Keep your camera case clean..

When changing lenses in the field turn off the camera and let it sit for around 30 seconds for any static charge on the sensor disipate..

Think carefully about your shoot, what lens for when and where to avoid changing lenses too much, this also helps you think about your shoot..

I've had little problems with dust on my D80, been either lucky or cleanliness is next to dustlessness...

Comment #6

Put another way is this an important enough diferientiator to stearaway from the Nikon and move to the Canon/sony or pentax?.

Well, you'd be steering in the wrong direction to move from Nikon to Canon, Sony, or Pentax based solely on dust removal alone..

By far the best, and proven dust removal system is in Olympus cameras, there's no question about it..

But that doesn't mean you have to choose a camera based solely on dust removal - in fact, that would be foolish..

You should base your decision on things that are important to you, not someone else. For me those things would be:1) ergonomics (including size and weight)2) lenses (price vs. quality)3) image quality (broadly inclusive).

Then, when you narrow it down, you can consider some of your less important factors, i.e. dust removal, GUI, button placement, etc.Tim'Be the change you wish to see in the world.' -Mahatma Gandhihttp://www.flickr.com/photos/timskis6/..

Comment #7

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This question was taken from a support group/message board and re-posted here so others can learn from it.

 

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