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Does anyone shoot like this?
I took my Canon 100-400 IS to the zoo to test it out and forgot that the LCD screen was set on brighter so I adjusted my exposures accordingly and all came out underexposed by probably 1 stop. Man was I disappointed. However, out of desperation I finally downloaded the software that came with the 30D to see if any of it could help. WOW! Making brightness and color adjustments in Zoom and tweaking in DPP made these photographs more than I could have asked for. My question is; does anyone out there do this delibrately or is it better to try for the correct exposure right off the bat?.

BB..

Comments (10)

It's always best to get the exposure right. And instead of looking at the screen, you should be looking at the histogram..

But, if you're going to screw it up, it's best to underexpose. You can recover a lot of the picture from that, whereas when you've blown the highlights the data is pretty much gone..

Underexposing by 1 stop is the same as a proper exposure at double the ISO..

The above assumes that your shooting raw. If your shooting jpeg it still applys but there is less tolerance in how far off you can be.A member of the rabble in good standing..

Comment #1

I shoot in RAW I try to get as close to perfect exposure as I can in the original frame. But then, I always tweak the photo in Adobe Camera RAW during the editing process. Best of both worlds!.

Paul..

Comment #2

Yup, I do this when I would normally do an HDR image set, but there is fast action which precludes taking 3 images for the HDR. i.e. fighter jet against overcast sky at an airshow. Most people don't calibrate their monitor's gamma (Hell, I don't!) so you can bump up the darks and reveal the details. This is preferable to overexposure, because it's not possible to restore clipped highlights. I find I can drag a lot out of the shadows, especially with noise reduction like Noise Ninja. Like another poster mentioned, if you can get more bit depth than the final 8-per-channel in the source image (RAW shooting) there's no down side to this at all...

Comment #3

I learned very quickly NOT to trust the LCD screen. Like everybody said, learn to use the histogram..

Changing the exposure later on your computer always result in worse image quality. Most visible is the increase of noise. Also, you still can't recover areas that are totally blown out. If you under/over exposed too much, the resulting "fixed-up" image will not look as good as a correctly exposed one..

Like everybody has said, shooting with RAW does give you more lattitude, meaning you can change more without degrading too much of the image quality...

Comment #4

I set my LCD brightness to give a reasonably accurate picture once and I never touch it..

But I hardly ever review images rather I will look at the histogram if I look at all..

It makes no sense just to stick with the image output from the camera. One of the great adventures of digital photography is the digital darkroom. Experiment with it. We all try to get it right in the camera but it is very useful to know what you can do in PP and shooting RAW and then exprimenting with different settings is a great way to learn how to get the best from your camera controls..

-Chris Elliott.

*Nikon* D Eighty + Fifty - Other equipment in Profile.

Http://PlacidoD.Zenfolio.com/..

Comment #5

I set the exposure bias to + or - quite often, depending on the situation. Main considerations are:.

1) What is important for you in the picture? Expose for that..

2) If you set the exposure to 0 or +, could it blow the highlights? Check/bracket..

3) Sometimes it's easier to recover shadows than highlights, so I, for instance, would most frequently expose at -1/3..

4) How contrasty is the scene? Depending on your assessment of that, you may want to crop out the part that wouldn't reproduce decently while composing, or, if that part isreally important, bracket and try HDR..

Http://lordofthelens.smugmug.com/..

Comment #6

Dylanbarnhart wrote:.

I learned very quickly NOT to trust the LCD screen. Like everybodysaid, learn to use the histogram..

Changing the exposure later on your computer always result in worseimage quality. Most visible is the increase of noise. Also, youstill can't recover areas that are totally blown out. If youunder/over exposed too much, the resulting "fixed-up" image will notlook as good as a correctly exposed one..

Like everybody has said, shooting with RAW does give you morelattitude, meaning you can change more without degrading too much ofthe image quality..

Over 100,000 images shot with dSLR's and I've never once checked one on the camera monitor. Never..

Keep track of you're settings, keep track of your technique, and adjust accordingly..

Dave..

Comment #7

Chato I find that extraordinary. Have you never shot a quick picture of a friend whilst pehaps their was a bit of action and you just wanted to know how it turned out. never shot some wildlife and wondered whethter the animal moved just before or just after to pressed the shutter. never taked a difficult expose with maybe the sun in the image and were interested to see how the exposure came out..

There's no law that says that you have to look at the LCD after a shot but 100,000 and you've never even been interested. the manufacturers put it there for a reason, funny you've never seen the point..

We shoot professionally in the studio taking portraits and often check the LCD to see if we could have done better.I think you are in a strange small minority.Ayreasons why?Jules.

Chato wrote:.

Over 100,000 images shot with dSLR's and I've never once checked oneon the camera monitor. Never..

Keep track of you're settings, keep track of your technique, andadjust accordingly..

Dave.

Why do you never see birds crash?..

Comment #8

Buzzardbob wrote:.

I took my Canon 100-400 IS to the zoo to test it out and forgot thatthe LCD screen was set on brighter so I adjusted my exposuresaccordingly and all came out underexposed by probably 1 stop. Man wasI disappointed. However, out of desperation I finally downloaded thesoftware that came with the 30D to see if any of it could help. WOW!Making brightness and color adjustments in Zoom and tweaking in DPPmade these photographs more than I could have asked for. My questionis; does anyone out there do this delibrately or is it better to tryfor the correct exposure right off the bat?.

You have to tread carefully. Nikon cameras are often set conservatively to preserve highlight information. But too much highlight preservation leads to blocked out shadows and noise in the shadows that make the cut. It's like exposing to the right (trying to get a histogram with most of the action in the rightmost half, and then opening out the seemingly over-exposed image in Photoshop Levels); too much of a good thing leads to blown highlights..

You name it, I've broken it...

Comment #9

JulesJ wrote:.

Chato I find that extraordinary. Have you never shot a quick pictureof a friend whilst pehaps their was a bit of action and you justwanted to know how it turned out. never shot some wildlife andwondered whethter the animal moved just before or just after topressed the shutter. never taked a difficult expose with maybe thesun in the image and were interested to see how the exposure came out.There's no law that says that you have to look at the LCD after ashot but 100,000 and you've never even been interested. themanufacturers put it there for a reason, funny you've never seen thepoint.We shoot professionally in the studio taking portraits and oftencheck the LCD to see if we could have done better.I think you are in a strange small minority.Ayreasons why?Jules.

The LCD does not show you the image. It shows you the LCD display of the image. Do I need to see whether it was framed correctly? If framing was possible, it occured when I took the shot, and I know how it was framed..

Will it show me if the image was in focus? I can't tell if there is perfect focus or "near" perfect focus. Will it show me if the animal moved? No more than I already know if the animal moved. One cannot ask the target to come back and do the shot over. Nor do I waste my precious time looking at the LCD when I'm shooting wildlife. I'm looking for MORE wildlife..

Am I curious? Yup, and as soon as I get home I check my images. Looking at them in the field wont help at all..

As for odd situations, I assume you've heard of bracketing?.

You shoot in a studio? Good for you. Sounds reasonable. I assume you're allowed to repeat the exact same shot with the exact same light? Hook your computer up to the camera perhaps?.

But you're right, I'm prepared to look at the monitor to delete images if I should ever run out of memory... .

NB. For shooting in the field it's strictly a waste of time. Under fixed conditions it can have some value..

Dave.

Chato wrote:.

Over 100,000 images shot with dSLR's and I've never once checked oneon the camera monitor. Never..

Keep track of you're settings, keep track of your technique, andadjust accordingly..

Dave.

Why do you never see birds crash?..

Comment #10

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This question was taken from a support group/message board and re-posted here so others can learn from it.

 

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