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Does anyone here use a polarizer with a lens hood?
I think it might be awkward to do so since one has to turn the filter to get the polarizing effect. If you guys were to make a decision, which one would you pick? Use a lens hood or a polarizer?..

Comments (19)

Sgt_Strider wrote:.

I think it might be awkward to do so since one has to turn the filterto get the polarizing effect. If you guys were to make a decision,which one would you pick? Use a lens hood or a polarizer?.

YES ... I use a lens-hood with a polarizer..

I used a "round" lens-hood that screws onto the polarizer ... and thus the entire "hood" is turned .... no problem..

Thanks for reading .... JoePhoto.

( Do You Ever STOP to THINK and FORGET to START Again ??? )..

Comment #1

Sometimes yes, sometimes no..

Many lenses require the "flower" shaped hoods or you get vignetting, particularly with a polarizer. Those that CAN use a round hood, YES. Most of those requiring a "flower" hood, NO..

Also, Tamron created a nice feature on several of their lenses to specifically allow for rotation of filters with the hood on. It works great, too.Van..

Comment #2

All the time!.

They don't interfere with each other. Although it is sometimes more a pain to adjust the polariser..

Perry.

__________________________.

Http://hellabella.de__________________________..

Comment #3

Since this is beginners forum could someone explain need for each (hood and polarizer)?Thanks!Crutch..

Comment #4

Your question here is a good one but is apt to be lost in this thread. So may I suggest that you start a new thread and ask the question in the 'subject' line. OR try doing a 'search' for the question..

When you pose a question within a thread, be sure to change the subject line..

Hope this is helpful and you get some replies in a new post.LucyE- 510 w/2 lens kit!U ZI owner!Olympus C30-20Zhttp://www.pbase.com/lucyFCAS Member #98, Oly Division'Photography is the art of seeing what others do not.'.

Image control:Zoom outZoom 100%Zoom inExpand AllOpen in new window..

Comment #5

I never use a CP except in bright sunlight, which is the very time you most need a hood. Therefore, although it is clumsy, I use both..

Jerryhttp://jchoate.zenfolio.com/..

Comment #6

Jchoate wrote:.

I never use a CP except in bright sunlight, which is the very timeyou most need a hood. Therefore, although it is clumsy, I use both..

Very Correct .... even though they both do very different things ... both are useful at exactly the SAME TIME in exactly the SAME SITUATIONS..

Neither a Lens Hood or Polarizer would be useful with photos taken directly "towards" or "away" from the sun..

There was another question asked to explain what both of them do. The Lens Hood keeps direct sun-light from striking the lens surface which can cause "internal" lens flare, (or glow from DUST on the front "surface" on the lens)..

The best analogy may be why you wear a BaseBall HAT in bright sunlight ... or flip down your sun-visor on your car. You want to SHIELD (shadow) the front surface of the lens. It won't do any good shooting directly "towards" the sun since the sun will indeed hit the lens anyway. HOWEVER .... I ALWAYS use a separate item (card/magazine, hat, or HAND) to shield/SHADOW the lens if actual "sun" is not included in the photo .....

I repeat that you NEVER want the sun to impact the front surface of the lens unless the "sun" is actually included as a "subject" in the desired image..

(You do not need a lens-hood if the sun is "behind" you; or you are turned more than 90 degrees so the sun would not strike the front-surface of the lens anyway.).

A polarizer reduces the "glare" from light reflected FROM your SUBJECT (sky, leaves on grass/trees, or surface of water or glass). A polarizer works "best", (has most effect) at exactly 90 degrees from the sun..

NOTE: .... I will concede that there is indeed a small range (just over 90 degrees) that a polarizer would still be somewhat effective, and a lens hood would not offer much help since the lens would usually be shadowed anyway, beyond 90 degrees.).

BUT .... for angles like 60 to 90 degrees ..... I would ABSOLUTELY use BOTH at the SAME TIME. (or use my hand - hat - card/magazine to shadow/shield my lens).

Jerryhttp://jchoate.zenfolio.com/.

Thanks for reading .... JoePhoto.

( Do You Ever STOP to THINK and FORGET to START Again ??? )..

Comment #7

Joe:.

Nice explanation. It says what I failed to take the time to say..

Jerryhttp://jchoate.zenfolio.com/..

Comment #8

JoePhoto wrote:.

A polarizer reduces the "glare" from light reflected FROM yourSUBJECT (sky, leaves on grass/trees, or surface of water or glass).A polarizer works "best", (has most effect) at exactly 90 degreesfrom the sun..

The 90 degree rule only applies to blue sky, not reflections...

Comment #9

Sgt_Strider wrote:.

I think it might be awkward to do so since one has to turn the filterto get the polarizing effect. If you guys were to make a decision,which one would you pick? Use a lens hood or a polarizer?.

This works for me:.

I use a "third party" screw-in rubber lens hood of the right diameter and shape (or collapsible/adjustable). These are relatively inexpensive, and come in various qualities. The better ones have steel/brass threads. "Hoya" makes quite good ones. They are surprisingly long-lived; I have one that is at least 25 years old (got it for a Minolta RF 7) and is still like new..

You screw one of these into the front thread of your CP filter (the back thread is attached to your camera's lens, as per usual). Once in position, it is very simple to adjust the relative angle of the CP filter by gripping the (circular) rubber lens hood and turning both together (as they are attached) to the required angle. Dead easy!.

Be careful -when using zoom lenses- that the lens hood is suitably wide for the widest end of your lens or you will get vignetting. Some very wide hoods are available, or you can use one that permits you to "collapse it by degrees" (according to need), so it can be adjusted as required...

Comment #10

This doesn'r really answer the question, but it will help. Page down on this link until you see 2 photos of the surf on a beach. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lens_filterTim..

Comment #11

BigScooter wrote:.

This doesn'r really answer the question, but it will help. Page downon this link until you see 2 photos of the surf on a beach.http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lens_filterTim.

A"filter" shot. The CP was used to "accentuate" the sky and clouds. (Taken with a Samsung Pro-815).

Image control:Zoom outZoom 100%Zoom inExpand AllOpen in new window..

Comment #12

I was talking about the reflection on the water, one shot had a nice white foamy surf crashing on the sand, the filtered shot there was no white, no reflection and you could see only the brown silt tumbling onto the beach. I see the Sky in your shot and I ask can you replicate what the filter did in PhotoShop, if so it's really not needed, but the Wikipedia shot can only be replicated with the filter removing the reflection that we see as "white caps" on the waves. I again appologize this really doesn't have anything to do with the question "Filters & Lens Hoods".Tim..

Comment #13

Steve Balcombe wrote:.

JoePhoto wrote:.

A polarizer reduces the "glare" from light reflected FROM yourSUBJECT (sky, leaves on grass/trees, or surface of water or glass).A polarizer works "best", (has most effect) at exactly 90 degreesfrom the sun..

The 90 degree rule only applies to blue sky, not reflections..

Indeed!.

The optimum angle for reflection suppression, where the pola is most effective at killing reflected glare from a surface, is 30 degrees to that surface..

In the case of HORIZONTAL surfaces the direction is most likely to be towards the sun... brilliant reflected glare off a wet road, say, where we would be pleased to use polarising sunglasses. When shooting in circumstances like these it's quite possible the GLARE is what makes the picture pictorial, and the pola would not be used.. but the hood definitely should be!.

As far the lenshood is concerned, the rule is that it should be ON unless there is some specific reason why it can't be used.. a pop-up flash throwing a shadow for instance.. (..with light from behind the lens, hooding is largely unnecessary, anyhow.).

With the pola there is NO rule! It's what the shot needs that matters, and that should be evaluated on a shot to shot basis..

[Using a pola routinely and without thought is a mistake American landscapers seem to make quite often, it seems to me.]Regards,Baz..

Comment #14

Some lens hoods have a removable 'door' at the bottom to allow you to rotate the polarizer with the hood on...

Comment #15

Kpschoedel wrote:.

Some lens hoods have a removable 'door' at the bottom to allow you torotate the polarizer with the hood on..

Really? Well, you learn something new every day.I wonder why I have never seen one of those...[??]Regards,Baz..

Comment #16

Barrie Davis wrote:.

Some lens hoods have a removable 'door' at the bottom to allow you torotate the polarizer with the hood on..

Really? Well, you learn something new every day.I wonder why I have never seen one of those...[??].

Apparently, having a hole in a lens cap is patented, if it can be covered..

Http://www.freepatentsonline.com/6269227.html.

Excuse me while I go patent a balaclava with nose-picking flaps, with a long list of separate claims for fastening the flaps with buttons, cufflinks, zippers, velcro, laces, and frozen snot...

Comment #17

Kpschoedel wrote:.

Barrie Davis wrote:.

Some lens hoods have a removable 'door' at the bottom to allow you torotate the polarizer with the hood on..

Really? Well, you learn something new every day.I wonder why I have never seen one of those...[??].

Apparently, having a hole in a lens cap is patented, if it can becovered..

Http://www.freepatentsonline.com/6269227.html.

Excuse me while I go patent a balaclava with nose-picking flaps, witha long list of separate claims for fastening the flaps with buttons,cufflinks, zippers, velcro, laces, and frozen snot..

A while ago there was much discussion on these forums about the guy who patented the idea of estimating the time that a runner would have passed a photo station, based on their start/finish times, in order to more easily find pictures of them in a gallery sorted by the times in the EXIF data..

Think about it....

"What time did you pass Tower Bridge".

"Mmmm let me see it's about 30 mins from the end of the race and I finished at 3pm so it must've been half past two.".

"Ok, here are the shots I took at Tower Bridge between 2:25 and 2:35, yours should be easy to find.".

That process, if done by a computer, is patented..

It really is time that the US sorted out their patent legislation. There isn't another country in the world that would have allowed that...

Comment #18

I use a polarise frequently but only use the lens hood occasionally - I try to avoid the "peak" sunlight hours & try to take most of my shots around sunrise/sunset - the lens hood being much less important at these times.

Simon.

Http://www.landscapephotographyuk.com/.

North Wales photographs - Snowdonia & Anglesey..

Comment #19

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This question was taken from a support group/message board and re-posted here so others can learn from it.

 

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