snubbr.com

Digital SLR: Clear or UV filter?
I don't want to get into the "protective filter or no protective filter" debate... But, assuming I do want a protective filter, here is my question:.

Which should I use? A clear or UV filter? I understand the purpose of UV filters for film, as film has a sensitivity to UV which shows as blue haze in the picture. But does a digital sensor suffer from this same sensitivity? I was under the impression that a digital camera has a built in bandpass filter that eliminates UV from hitting the sensor, so one would expect for digital cameras, that a clear filter is fine..

Any comments?.

- Bob..

Comments (21)

I am thinking about getting something/anything to protect my lens, but turns out there are so many different "flavors" of the protective lens... I read that you just buy whatever is the most expensive you can afford, since you get what you pay for, but... what about the features such as UV and stuff?.

Good question!..

Comment #1

I asked for a clear filter one time & the "clear" one the local camera shop sells was a STD UV filter..

The sensor might be setup for bandpass, that may be true, but I don't think the lens optics or the pentaprism are UV protected..

For all day, sunny shoots, the UV filter will probably save your eye from UV more than anything..

I let the guy sell me on a fairly expensive ($45 for a 62mm) 13 times-coated, UV filter for my new camera & lens. Not sure if the coatings make a difference or not.'OOOOOH, they have the Internet on computers now!' Homer J. Simpson..

Comment #2

Kmac1036 wrote:I don't think the lens optics or the pentaprism are UV protected..

For all day, sunny shoots, the UV filter will probably save your eyefrom UV more than anything..

And why would the optics or pentaprism need UV protection?.

Given the amount of time you're viewing the world through the camera vs. not viewing the world through the camera I'd suggest a pair of sunglasses to protect your eyes if that's your concern...

Comment #3

Use your lens hood (that's why you have one, as well as reducing glare) and just buy a good quality lens cleaner for when it's needed. Let's face it, are you that clumsy that you are likely to damage your lens optics?..

Comment #4

I'm not sure what you mean by a clear filter, but a UV filter is essentially just that, a clear filter for your digital camera. If using a UV or clear filter, always buy a very good filter, do not skimp on this. The filter should not add any color or reduce sharpness at all in your photos. So test the filter after you buy it..

From a tripod, shoot a book cover with small lettering and different colors, including white. Shoot the book with and without the filter, there should be absolutely no difference in color or sharpness. All the small letters should be just as clear with and without the filter, and with no color difference. I did this with a couple of cheaper UV filters and the difference was very big. I opted for more expensive filters and they performed perfectly doing this same test. I only use UV filters when circumstances call for it (wary of something possibly touching/striking the lens), which is not very often..

Good luck!Albert-OPlease visit me athttp://www.berto.zenfolio.com..

Comment #5

Glass or silicon oxide in the form of fused silica or high purity silicon dioxide all filter out uv light. glass is by nature a uv filter. So buy whatever sounds good to you. what is important is that is have anitreflection coating. USUALLY the more expensive glass has a better coating. if you dont get a good anti reflection coating it WILL interfere with you image quality and you will have problems..

I got one too because I was afraid of hurting my lens. I used it for about 3 weeks until I started noticing how it affected my images. now it stays off unless I am in a really harsh environment and then the ill effects can pretty much be neglected anyway...

Comment #6

So... Get a lens hood for some protection? I am most likely not going to spend lots for a quality glass for my kit lens... Plus, I shoot portrait, so nothing should be touching my lens.....

Comment #7

Stargooner wrote:.

Use your lens hood (that's why you have one, as well as reducingglare) and just buy a good quality lens cleaner for when it's needed.Let's face it, are you that clumsy that you are likely to damage yourlens optics?.

No - but for me it's easier to clean a flat removable filter than a curved lens surface...

Comment #8

As I said in another message, for ME it is easier to clean (and see the dirt) on a flat removable filter than on a curved lens surface. It probably doesn't make much differnence for most people, but I personally find it much easier to keep a flat filter clean..

I was looking at the Hoya Pro 1 Digital multi-coated filters... They make a "clear glass" and a "UV 0". I'm not sure how much of this stuff is marketing hype (I do understand the benefits of using a multi-coated filter, if going to use one at all). But is a UV 0 really necessary?.

Maybe I'll get one of each, and try them out, and dump the one I don't want on eBay...

Comment #9

For digital media, clear vs uv: es macht nicht..

You will not be able to tell the difference. You will be able to tell the difference between an uncoated filter and a more expensive multi-coated one, however. And you still need to use the lens shade, perhaps more so with the filter than without..

I find these filter a useful addition to the kit. I usually remove them for cleaning, and prefer using running water and mild detergent, blotting dry and polishing with a microfiber cloth. This may not be the recommended treatment, but it's quick, easy, and effective and, after all, it's just a filter...

Comment #10

Kmac1036 wrote:.

The sensor might be setup for bandpass, that may be true, but I don'tthink the lens optics or the pentaprism are UV protected..

Last I checked, glass wasn't actually damaged by UV. ..

Comment #11

Just some unsolicited geek stuff here:.

Glass or silicon oxide in the form of fused silica or high puritysilicon dioxide all filter out uv light. glass is by nature a uvfilter..

*Very* pure silicon dioxide (i.e. crystalline , Quartz) actually transmits UV very nicely..

But yes, in my experience at least,... glass (amorphous) silicon dioxide attenuates UV transmission fairly dramatically (but not completely)..

Comment #12

Never said it did! I just brought up the point that I didn't "think" those 2 items filtered out UV, never said UV damages the optics, except your own eyes, which it does..

I may not be the all knowing God of Photography, or the Universe... But at least I can read comments in a forum & not jump to conclusions .

Zadam wrote:.

Kmac1036 wrote:.

The sensor might be setup for bandpass, that may be true, but I don'tthink the lens optics or the pentaprism are UV protected..

Last I checked, glass wasn't actually damaged by UV. .

'OOOOOH, they have the Internet on computers now!' Homer J. Simpson..

Comment #13

I usually removethem for cleaning, and prefer using running water and mild detergent,blotting dry and polishing with a microfiber cloth. This may not bethe recommended treatment, but it's quick, easy, and effective and,after all, it's just a filter..

That is the way I prefer to clean also...

Comment #14

My bad... The way you worded it, I assumed you implied that the lens optics and pentaprism are not UV protected (and need protection from said UV)..

Kmac1036 wrote:.

Never said it did! I just brought up the point that I didn't "think"those 2 items filtered out UV, never said UV damages the optics,except your own eyes, which it does..

I may not be the all knowing God of Photography, or the Universe...But at least I can read comments in a forum & not jump to conclusions.

Zadam wrote:.

Kmac1036 wrote:.

The sensor might be setup for bandpass, that may be true, but I don'tthink the lens optics or the pentaprism are UV protected..

Last I checked, glass wasn't actually damaged by UV. .

'OOOOOH, they have the Internet on computers now!' Homer J. Simpson..

Comment #15

That's ok, looked at it again & yes, it could appear that way. sorry for the misunderstanding..

Back to subject at hand: the filter I got, states on the back it reduces haze..

Meh, oh well. I wound up taking everything back, need to regroup & figure out what I need for glass... but that's another thread!'OOOOOH, they have the Internet on computers now!' Homer J. Simpson..

Comment #16

Here's my test with a HOYA HMC 58mm UV (0) multicoated filter.

Http://forums.dpreview.com/...ums/readflat.asp?forum=1002&thread=27884120.

Olympus Evolt E-510Zuiko Digital ED 14-42mm and 40-150mm kit lenshttp://www.flickr.com/photos/supervf1/ < My Flickr..

Comment #17

SuperVF1 wrote:.

Here's my test with a HOYA HMC 58mm UV (0) multicoated filter.

Http://forums.dpreview.com/...ums/readflat.asp?forum=1002&thread=27884120.

I am sorry to take issue on the matter, but I don't find your test very convincing, I'm afraid..

I am concerned that you may have confused the first two shots, and got them the wrong way round, because your results conflict with my experience......

I would not expect even the best filter to *fix* flare at all. Indeed, the big problem with filters is that, if we are unlucky, they can CAUSE flare, and that the best we can hope for regarding filters and flare is that they are neutral, and don't make it any worse..

Now, for limiting flare I tend to put my trust in the traditional lens hood..... so, I wonder, did you use a hood on either of these shots? Or both?Regards,Baz..

Comment #18

If you read under my 'test equipment' part of my post, I used NO hoods for my test. I used 2 different set of memory cards, one to save with filter, and the other without. My Olympus E-510 uses both CF (with filter) and xD (without filter). I uploaded and categorized them one memory card at a time to prevent 'confusion'..

I don't use UV filter unless on extreme situations, dust, salt spray, etc....I myself prefer to use hoods.

Barrie Davis wrote:.

SuperVF1 wrote:.

Here's my test with a HOYA HMC 58mm UV (0) multicoated filter.

Http://forums.dpreview.com/...ums/readflat.asp?forum=1002&thread=27884120.

I am sorry to take issue on the matter, but I don't find your testvery convincing, I'm afraid..

I am concerned that you may have confused the first two shots, andgot them the wrong way round, because your results conflict with myexperience......

I would not expect even the best filter to *fix* flare at all.Indeed, the big problem with filters is that, if we are unlucky, theycan CAUSE flare, and that the best we can hope for regarding filtersand flare is that they are neutral, and don't make it any worse..

Now, for limiting flare I tend to put my trust in the traditionallens hood..... so, I wonder, did you use a hood on either of theseshots? Or both?Regards,Baz.

Olympus Evolt E-510Zuiko Digital ED 14-42mm and 40-150mm kit lenshttp://www.flickr.com/photos/supervf1/ < My Flickr..

Comment #19

Thanks for the response..

SuperVF1 wrote:.

If you read under my 'test equipment' part of my post, I used NOhoods for my test. I used 2 different set of memory cards, one tosave with filter, and the other without. My Olympus E-510 uses bothCF (with filter) and xD (without filter). I uploaded and categorizedthem one memory card at a time to prevent 'confusion'..

Thanks for the extra detail. It seems you took every reasonable precaution to avoid any mix up, so I must accept you test as diligently carried out....

....... which doesn't change the fact that something odd has happened. However, perhaps it would be wiser to just acknowledge that oddball results do occur from time to time, eh? .

I don't use UV filter unless on extreme situations, dust, salt spray,etc....I myself prefer to use hoods.

And those are my usual actions, too..

Thanks again for your gracious reply.Regards,Baz..

Comment #20

Kmac1036 wrote:.

Back to subject at hand: the filter I got, states on the back itreduces haze..

The "haze" being referred to is not the physical haze most people associate with the term. It is talking about the UV hazing of film that occurred in the old days of film. The UV filter can not reduce haze in the scene itself...

Comment #21

Click Here to View All...

Sponsored Amazon Deals:

1. Get big savings on Amazon warehouse deals.
2. Save up to 70% on Amazon Products.


This question was taken from a support group/message board and re-posted here so others can learn from it.

 

Categories: Home | Diet & Weight Management | Vitamins & Supplements | Herbs & Cleansing |

Sexual Health | Medifast Support | Nutrisystem Support | Medifast Questions |

Web Hosting | Web Hosts | Website Hosting | Hosting |

Web Hosting | GoDaddy | Digital Cameras | Best WebHosts |

Web Hosting FAQ | Web Hosts FAQ | Hosting FAQ | Hosting Group |

Hosting Questions | Camera Tips | Best Cameras To Buy | Best Cameras This Year |

Camera Q-A | Digital Cameras Q-A | Camera Forum | Nov 2010 - Cameras |

Oct 2010 - Cameras | Oct 2010 - DSLRs | Oct 2010 - Camera Tips | Sep 2010 - Cameras |

Sep 2010 - DSLRS | Sep 2010 - Camera Tips | Aug 2010 - Cameras | Aug 2010 - DSLR Tips |

Aug 2010 - Camera Tips | July 2010 - Cameras | July 2010 - Nikon Cameras | July 2010 - Canon Cameras |

July 2010 - Pentax Cameras | Medifast Recipes | Medifast Recipes Tips | Medifast Recipes Strategies |

Medifast Recipes Experiences | Medifast Recipes Group | Medifast Recipes Forum | Medifast Support Strategies |

Medifast Support Experiences |

 

(C) Copyright 2010 All rights reserved.