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Debating between the XSI, and E-520. Interested in your views...
Hello:.

So I've pretty much narrowed my next purchase decision between the Canon XSI and Olympus E-520 (I've ruled out D60, A350, and possibly the K200D). The last month I've flipped back and forth, but pretty much nailed it down to these two..

It seems like the XSI is the benchmark that many new DSLRs are compared against. For folks who may have handled the two (or familiar with them) why choose the E-520 over the XSI?.

I know their spec's pretty well, and I've held them both...both feel good in the hands..

I've seen a few post regarding the E-520 and most folks don't seem overly enthusiastic about it, but nonetheless, Olympus intrigues me with their four thirds sensor approach..

The dollar difference isn't a concern.....

Thx,PJ..

Comments (38)

If I were to buy one of those 2 cameras it would be the Oly E-520. From the reviews I have read it is really a good choice, but I am very satisfied with my Nikon D60! Takes great pictures and that is the key!Nikon D60 18-55vr & 55-200vrSB400Casio Z750..

Comment #1

The XSi has the edge for image quality. Not that you'd see the difference in a 4x6 print, but ultimately, if you're choosing on image quality alone, it's the Canon. And image quality is kind of what matters..

Oh, and it has a nice big LCD. And a huge range of lenses and accessories, is nice and easy to use, and fast too..

The E520 has built-in stabilisation, and by all accounts a better dust-removal system. But really, it's the IS that Olympus are counting on attracting you with, so you'll accept slightly worse (though still first-rate) image quality..

Nobody would blame you for chosing either one..

Androohttp://Androo.smugmug.com..

Comment #2

I was in a similar situation and decided to go with the 520 after reading reviews, other peoples advice, and most importantly my own instinct..

After I had a quick play with both of them in the shop, the olympus one just felt better to me.. Somehow more intuitive and more compact, and the more I researched it, the more I liked it..

Olympus seems to be taking a different approach towards their designs, and it appeals to me more than the other options around at the moment..

Having said that, I have seen great photos taken with both the canon and olympus... and from my own research, it seems like either would be a good choice.I say, have a feel of both, and go with your instinct...

Comment #3

I looked at both. There were many reasons I picked the XSi over the E-520. But if there was only one, it is because the high ISO performance of the XSi is better; even Oly folks admitted that when I inquired in the Oly forum..

I moved from a compact digital camera to a DSLR specifically because of the superior high ISO performance. In that regard, between the two, the choice was a no brainer..

Gail ~ http://www.pbase.com/gailbMy digital camera BLOGs: Canon XSi, SD700; Pany FZ18 & more.http://www.digicamhelp.com/camera-logs/index.php..

Comment #4

Thanks for the great responses...all very helpful. I've read positive reviews on both cameras..

The attributes in favor of the E520 include build quality and built in IS. But I gotta say that Canon's IS lenses are very much affordable..

At the end of the day, are their other attributes that the the E520 has over the XSI that I'm not considering? Seems XSI has better IQ, larger lcd, etc..

Granted the E520 is cheaper as well....

Thanks.....

Comment #5

Another reason I chose the XSi is because of the in lens Image Stabilization. I don't get embroiled in the debate over which is "better." I'm not personally convinced one IS system is better than the other..

However, IS in the lens suits my photography style. I like to photograph wildlife, including birds in fllight. In-lens IS stabilizes the view as you look through the viewfinder, important when tracking a moving subject using long focal lengths..

From what I've been told, in-camera IS does not stabilize the view..

Gail ~ http://www.pbase.com/gailbMy digital camera BLOGs: Canon XSi, SD700; Pany FZ18 & more.http://www.digicamhelp.com/camera-logs/index.php..

Comment #6

Phatjoe wrote:.

Thanks for the great responses...all very helpful. I've readpositive reviews on both cameras..

The attributes in favor of the E520 include build quality and builtin IS. But I gotta say that Canon's IS lenses are very muchaffordable..

Although Canon made improvements to the kit lenses, IS and all, they still are generally considered the weakest of the kit lenses offerings. They suffering from strong vignetting, chromatic abberation as well. Among the kit lenses, the Olympus' are among the best. Pentax offers excellent kit lenses as well..

At the end of the day, are their other attributes that the the E520has over the XSI that I'm not considering? Seems XSI has better IQ,larger lcd, etc..

Another problem that I've been reading in the Canon forums is that the XSi seems to be very soft, especially compare to the XT and XTi. At default settings, the Canon can be very soft, suprising for Canon. This can be overcome, I imagine by shooting RAW, but then you must post-process every file..

Another chronic issue with Canon is quality control. Constant back-focus, front-focus issues and the like. Search in the Canon forums. And THIS kind of particular issue has plagued Canon from one generation to another.http://forums.dpreview.com/...forums/read.asp?forum=1031&message=28196741.

Http://forums.dpreview.com/...=1031&message=28616640&q=focus&qf=mhttp://forums.dpreview.com/...forums/read.asp?forum=1031&message=28611183.

Granted the E520 is cheaper as well....

Thanks....

Shinndigghttp://www.pbase.com/shinndigg..

Comment #7

I'd probably go the XSi route. Given that the new 18-55 IS kit lens is very sharp, the kit lens difference is not as great. Canon gives a clear advantage in low light, less noise perfomance. Canon has a huge network of warranty centers, accessories, system components, etc. I like the larger APS-C sensor. I prefer in-lense IS..

On the Olympus side, they have some of the best glass in the business with very few less than great lenses in their arsenal. IMO, the only rival to Oly glass is Nikon glass as far as general optical quality. Both take consumer glass more seriously than others, it seems to me. Glass is what it's all about..

So, in a photo finish, it's the Canon, IMO..

That said, the Canon 40D is just a fraction more than the XSi and is far and away a better camera. If you can see that slight increase in price, you'd be getting a much better bang for your buck..

Also, as far as the Olympus line is concerned, consider one of the advantages to a smaller sensor is that you can make smaller, lighter lenses. IMO, the Oly 420 is just such a jewel for those smaller lighter lenses and would make a great camera to build a small, well crafted system around. That's what Oly used to be all about, and still can be. Look at that 420 with a pancake lens. Wonderful idea..

Cheers, Craig..

Comment #8

I bought my first DSLR in May. I walked out with a kit lens and a telephoto. One month later I spent $400 for a macro lens. Today I spent $700 for a wide angle. Later on I will buy a flash and maybe next year a 400mm for wildlife..

Three or four years from now your camera body will be obsolete. Which lenses and accessories are you going to be glad that you own?..

Comment #9

Guidenet wrote:.

I'd probably go the XSi route. Given that the new 18-55 IS kit lensis very sharp, the kit lens difference is not as great..

Not sure some would agree. Note what this XSi user has to say about the kit lens (all XSi'scome with the new IS version).

"I would advise anyone to stay away from the Canon EOS 450D Digital Rebel XSi. I just returned mine to Target where I bought it. The new lens (IS), at least my copy, had great center focus at 18mm but lousy focus on the edges at infinity settings. The lens distortion towards the edges is much worse than previous kit lenses. There is almost a smearing of the image toward the corners and blue fringing also. If you do landscapes this lens is bad.

My copy was not one that had good edge to edge sharpness. Also, the 450D misses precise focus when you are doing close work with only the center focus point chosen. The same shot, shot several times in a row will have the focus point in different places than the center, especially at low f-stops.".

Here: http://www.dpreview.com/...n_text.asp?prodkey=canon_eos450d&opinion=40827.

Canon gives a clear advantage in low light, less noise perfomance..

Canon no longer holds a great advantage. Marginal at best. Exceppt over the Sony DSLR's..

Canon has a huge network of warranty centers, accessories, system components, etc..

C.

An't argue on that point. Problem is, one will likely get to know the warranty centers VERY well, what with all of the apparent Quality Control problems Canon has..

I like the larger APS-C sensor. I prefer in-lense IS..

Sensor size isn't an issue. IS is GREAT! I have a 55-200 Nikon VR lens for my D50. Nice!!!.

On the Olympus side, they have some of the best glass in the businesswith very few less than great lenses in their arsenal. IMO, the onlyrival to Oly glass is Nikon glass as far as general optical quality.Both take consumer glass more seriously than others, it seems to me.Glass is what it's all about..

So, in a photo finish, it's the Canon, IMO..

That said, the Canon 40D is just a fraction more than the XSi and isfar and away a better camera. If you can see that slight increase inprice, you'd be getting a much better bang for your buck..

Also, as far as the Olympus line is concerned, consider one of theadvantages to a smaller sensor is that you can make smaller, lighterlenses. IMO, the Oly 420 is just such a jewel for those smallerlighter lenses and would make a great camera to build a small, wellcrafted system around. That's what Oly used to be all about, andstill can be. Look at that 420 with a pancake lens. Wonderful idea..

I agree as well on this point. The K200D with primes would alos be a great choice. Pentax seems to have something special going on with the pancake primes..

Cheers, Craig.

Shinndigghttp://www.pbase.com/shinndigg..

Comment #10

Phatjoe wrote:.

Hello:.

So I've pretty much narrowed my next purchase decision between theCanon XSI and Olympus E-520 (I've ruled out D60, A350, and possiblythe K200D). The last month I've flipped back and forth, but prettymuch nailed it down to these two..

It seems like the XSI is the benchmark that many new DSLRs arecompared against. For folks who may have handled the two (orfamiliar with them) why choose the E-520 over the XSI?.

I know their spec's pretty well, and I've held them both...both feelgood in the hands..

I've seen a few post regarding the E-520 and most folks don't seemoverly enthusiastic about it, but nonetheless, Olympus intrigues mewith their four thirds sensor approach..

The dollar difference isn't a concern.....

Thx,PJ.

I would not get either, but they are both great cameras. There are far too many threads about bad auto focus with the Canon 450 though. Good ones seem very nice but be sure you can test the camera you buy for back/front focus...be sure to test the af , select the centre focus point manually rather than let the camera choose the point..

Neil...

Comment #11

Andrew Butterfield wrote:.

The XSi has the edge for image quality. Not that you'd see thedifference in a 4x6 print, but ultimately, if you're choosing onimage quality alone, it's the Canon. And image quality is kind ofwhat matters..

This fellow has the wrong stance on IQ. IQ is not a definite value which can be measured and attributed a value. It is wholly subjective. The two camera manufacturers have different attitudes to colour. The canon is about tonal accuracy, and the Olympus is about recording all those colours, and displaying them beautifully. I have no experience with Olympus DSLR's, but many a tme have I heard about the famed Olympus colours.



To comment on the thing about Canon's support, having spent some time on the Olympus forums (which are lovely), I have found that in terms of technical support, Olympus are fantastic, and as long as you live in a well supported country (US, UK, Japan, Canada being the major ones and am sure there are others) you are well covered..

You cant go wrong with either, so just go with your heart (cheesy, I know)..

Enjoy your camera!.

Daniel..

Comment #12

Image stabilized lenses are available for the Four Thirds platform as well, and they are 100% compatible with the Olympus E-520..

Gail wrote:.

Another reason I chose the XSi is because of the in lens ImageStabilization. I don't get embroiled in the debate over which is"better." I'm not personally convinced one IS system is better thanthe other..

However, IS in the lens suits my photography style. I like tophotograph wildlife, including birds in fllight. In-lens ISstabilizes the view as you look through the viewfinder, importantwhen tracking a moving subject using long focal lengths..

From what I've been told, in-camera IS does not stabilize the view..

Gail ~ http://www.pbase.com/gailbMy digital camera BLOGs: Canon XSi, SD700; Pany FZ18 & more.http://www.digicamhelp.com/camera-logs/index.php..

Comment #13

IQ is not "wholly subjective" - it CAN be quantified and measured. Resolution, dynamic range and noise performance, especially at high ISOs or in shadows can and is reliably measured and can be seen in the resulting print..

If it came to a choice between Canon and Olympus I would go with the Canon for superior IQ and a greater availability of lenses and accessories. If you choose the Olympus for other reasons, then well and good, but I couldn't in good conscience recommend it on the basis of IQ..

The so called "Olympus colours" may have had some basis in fact in the past, but this is just not the case any more, especially when shooting RAW...

Comment #14

Jrkliny wrote:.

I bought my first DSLR in May. I walked out with a kit lens and atelephoto. One month later I spent $400 for a macro lens. Today Ispent $700 for a wide angle. Later on I will buy a flash and maybenext year a 400mm for wildlife..

Three or four years from now your camera body will be obsolete.Which lenses and accessories are you going to be glad that you own?.

Well now, I shoot Nikon and most everything I buy is going to be usable down the road. I have lenses now going back to the late 60s I still use today on my D300. As the world moves closer to full frame, some of my DX lenses won't work as well on those cameras, but I think I'll continue with some of my DX bodies..

I know my flashes will work because if Nikon betters their CLS I'll regulate them to manual on stands with umbrellas. I've got a couple of older strobes I do that with..

Most lenses and accessories are purchased for a lifetime, at least for me. They tend not to obsolete like bodies might. That said, my D300 should take as beautiful a picture as it does today. I changed from Pentax to Nikon around 1967. I've stuck with the same brand since and have compiled a fairly nice set of tools. Had I purchased another brand, the mounts would have changed and I'd have to use adapters and such.

I still have an Oly OM1 and some lenses. They don't work as well on newer cameras..

Cheers, Craig..

Comment #15

Chris59 wrote:.

IQ is not "wholly subjective" - it CAN be quantified and measured.Resolution, dynamic range and noise performance, especially at highISOs or in shadows can and is reliably measured and can be seen inthe resulting print..

I'm sorry, you are right. I was talking about summarising IQ as a single figure, or looking at two images and saying one is factually better. But unless at extremes (Large print, large ISO) I wouldnt say the that noise performance and resolution are important, would you?.

The so called "Olympus colours" may have had some basis in fact inthe past, but this is just not the case any more, especially whenshooting RAW..

Obviously we are talking JPEG here, which it seems the poster would be more concerned about..

Daniel..

Comment #16

In a way you are correct about image quality being important in larger prints rather than smaller. I will of course never print all my images to a large size, but it is nice to know I can without losing quality..

Also, I'm not sure the OP is interested mainly in JPG. I assume (I may be wrong in this of course) that if he is interested in buying a DSLR for the first time that IQ is the main reason for doing so. I also further assume he would therefore be more interested in saving his images as RAW files to make the most of what the camera and lens can deliver..

You are absolutely correct in saying that you cannot sum up IQ in a single figure or factor which is why it amuses me when so much argument and bad feeling is generated over the final DP Review score or "Recommendation" for a particular camera...

Comment #17

It does tickle me too, but I know why. It is because whenpractically all new DSLR's get highly recommendeds, when something gets only a recommended, it suggests inferiority to the other brands, and that gets the fanboys going (:.

Maybe it is due to my inexperienceat this level of photography, but thought that most new photographers take a long while to start shooting RAW, because JPEG is easier, less time consuming and better (for them). But maybe I am wrong....

Daniel..

Comment #18

My favourite assessment is Highly Recommended (just). It's a bit like saying hugely pregnant, just!.

As for RAW, I'm not sure how long it takes someone to try shooting and saving in RAW but once you try it and see how much sharper and more detailed the image is and how much better it reponds to basic PP, there is NO going back... at least for me...

Comment #19

Neil holmes wrote:.

I would not get either, but they are both great cameras. There arefar too many threads about bad auto focus with the Canon 450 though.Good ones seem very nice but be sure you can test the camera you buyfor back/front focus...be sure to test the af , select the centrefocus point manually rather than let the camera choose the point..

Neil..

Hey Neil,.

Just curious, what would you recommend?..

Comment #20

Chris59 wrote:.

My favourite assessment is Highly Recommended (just). It's a bitlike saying hugely pregnant, just!.

As for RAW, I'm not sure how long it takes someone to try shootingand saving in RAW but once you try it and see how much sharper andmore detailed the image is and how much better it reponds to basicPP, there is NO going back... at least for me..

It's easier to shoot raw since you can recover from exposure errors that would ruin a jpeg. You do have to convert them afterwards, but that's no big deal. Jpegs are for experts who can nail the exposure every time...

Comment #21

Allan wrote:.

Image stabilized lenses are available for the Four Thirds platform aswell, and they are 100% compatible with the Olympus E-520..

Question: So if you use an image stablized lens, you'd need to shut off the in-camera IS?.

Gail ~ http://www.pbase.com/gailbMy digital camera BLOGs: Canon XSi, SD700; Pany FZ18 & more.http://www.digicamhelp.com/camera-logs/index.php..

Comment #22

Shinndigg wrote:.

Guidenet wrote:.

I'd probably go the XSi route. Given that the new 18-55 IS kit lensis very sharp, the kit lens difference is not as great..

Not sure some would agree. Note what this XSi user has to say aboutthe kit lens.

Many of us are more than pleased with the images we get from the kit lenses, even first time DSLR users like myself (otherwise enjoying photography as a hobby for more than 35 years). Both the XSi and the kit lens that can be bought with it have gotten some fine reviews..

Yes, some owners have had problems but in the many years I've participated in these forums, it's nothing new or unique to Canon. There are even some who blame the camera or lens when it's user error or inexperience..

I'm still learning how to use a DSLR and the intricacies of lenses, but if you want to take a look at some of my first images from kit and inexpensive lenses (18-55mm IS; 55-250mm IS; 50mm 1.8), please do:.

Http://www.pbase.com/gailb/xsi.

(all XSi'scome with the new IS version).

This in incorrect. You can buy the XSi body without the lens, though probably not at places like Target!!.

I personally don't care what brand camera other photographers buy. We are fortunate to have so many fine choices today. But I do want to affirm that many of us are thrilled with the XSi, and even our kit lenses. The XSi received "highly recommended" at this site and the rating is well deserved..

Gail ~ http://www.pbase.com/gailbMy digital camera BLOGs: Canon XSi, SD700; Pany FZ18 & more.http://www.digicamhelp.com/camera-logs/index.php..

Comment #23

All those cameras you have listed are ranked in the latest issue of Popular Photography, and XSi is the best. Therefore, don't think, just buy the XSi..

(OK, I may be biased since I own one... he he)..

Comment #24

Yes, you need to shut down one IS system or the other. Here's a video demonstrating what happens when you try to have both on at the same time (it's about halfway through the video):.

Http://youtube.com/watch?v=KPdy52mR6Io.

Gail wrote:.

Question: So if you use an image stablized lens, you'd need to shutoff the in-camera IS?..

Comment #25

Phatjoe wrote:.

Neil holmes wrote:.

I would not get either, but they are both great cameras. There arefar too many threads about bad auto focus with the Canon 450 though.Good ones seem very nice but be sure you can test the camera you buyfor back/front focus...be sure to test the af , select the centrefocus point manually rather than let the camera choose the point..

Neil..

Hey Neil,.

Just curious, what would you recommend?.

Hi.

All cameras made in the last few years have great IQ, there are no real dogs at all..

It depends on what you want to shoot really, not Oly for low light, not Canon or Nikon if you want to shoot low light with stabilized primes etc..

If you have a specific need then it will make a difference big enough to matter but for general stuff, you should try as many cameras as you can and get what YOU like....they are all good..

I use Pentax for low light with decent iso 3200 on the 6mp older cameras, stabilization of all my lenses on a K100d but especially my short fast primes and longer tele lenses..

It may not be the BEST in absolute terms, but to get the same type of lenses in Canon or Nikon as I have with Pentax would cost me something like ten thousand dollars more....aor at least one single lens with Canon (covering one of mine)would cost more than my entire kit. I am happy to use manual focus and I can also auto focus all my manual focus lenses with an adapter....thats me though, again try whatever you can..

Neil..

Comment #26

I'd read this thread.

Http://forums.dpreview.com/...forums/read.asp?forum=1014&message=28579827.

And then buy the one YOU like the best regardless of what anyone has to say around here as you can get anyone to rationalize anything you are considering..

Good luck, hit a a store and pull out the plastic and say thank you..

They are all capable, they all can take great pictures, any of them will make you happy..

Comment #27

Profborg wrote:.

You can still autofocus on those old lenses?Daniel.

Don't be silly!Cheers, Craig..

Comment #28

Ok everyone likes their camera. So lets cut to the chase..

The lease important thing overall in the system, e.g. photographer, camera body, lens, is the camera body. ALL the DSLRs available today will take excellent images. All of them. So you have one variable which is basically a wash unless you want to count pixals, take pictures in very dark rooms without a flash, or whatever..

So we are left with the photographer and lenses. All the manufacturers make good lenses. Canon and Nikon make the most and there are more 3rd party lenses. But honestly how many lenses do you need. There are 32 lenses available for Olympus at last count. I think that will cover all of my requirements with about 28 lenses left over.

All of the manufacturer make good quality lenses. However based on what I have read and experienced particularly in the kit lens area Oly and Pentax have the best kit lens quality. There are so many other lenses that it really comes down to value. Can you get equiv quality lenses at the same prices. Generally the answer again is yes.

So in my opinion Oly comes out slightly ahead here. Please note I said slightly..

That leaves us with the most important part of the system...the photographer. YOU have to decide what is the most comfortable system for you. Generally the Oly will have a lighter body and much lighter lenses. Does this matter to you? I don't know and nobody on these forums can make that decision. Some people like a heavier system. I don't but I don't like a really feather weight either.

If your 6'10 and have hands like Shak then you most likely will not be comfortable with a small camera..

The MOST important aspect in taking pictures is the PHOTOGRAPHER and his/her knowledge of his/her tools and his/her comfort in using that tool. DON'T put too much thought into the tool. Painters don't stand around admiring each others brushes. They talk technique. I've see shots with Point and Shoots that are better then anything I can take with my fancy DSLR because the guy/gal that took them has more understanding of composition and has a better eye for what is interesting and they get the most from their tools..

JimOlympus E-510 and a bunch of stuff to hang on it...

Comment #29

Gail wrote:.

Shinndigg wrote:.

Guidenet wrote:.

I'd probably go the XSi route. Given that the new 18-55 IS kit lensis very sharp, the kit lens difference is not as great..

Not sure some would agree. Note what this XSi user has to say aboutthe kit lens.

Many of us are more than pleased with the images we get from the kitlenses, even first time DSLR users like myself (otherwise enjoyingphotography as a hobby for more than 35 years). Both the XSi and thekit lens that can be bought with it have gotten some fine reviews..

Certainly the XSi is very capable of making fine images, no doubt about it. That's not the question nor the problem..

Yes, some owners have had problems but in the many years I'veparticipated in these forums, it's nothing new or unique to Canon.There are even some who blame the camera or lens when it's user erroror inexperience..

And that's the usual excuse brand fanatics of all types use. Problem is, that isn't the usual problem, especially when it comes to the Back focus-front focus problems that plague Canon. and it's not limited to the DRebel line..

See the underexposure problem that plagued the XTi. Canon refused to regonize a problem, yet when users sent their cameras in, the came back readjusted and working fine..

I'm still learning how to use a DSLR and the intricacies of lenses,but if you want to take a look at some of my first images from kitand inexpensive lenses (18-55mm IS; 55-250mm IS; 50mm 1.8), please do:.

Fine images. There can be quite a learning curve when going from P&S cams to DSLRs..

Http://www.pbase.com/gailb/xsi.

(all XSi'scome with the new IS version).

This in incorrect. You can buy the XSi body without the lens, thoughprobably not at places like Target!!.

But as a KIT, they come with the IS version of the 18-55mm lens.

I personally don't care what brand camera other photographers buy. Weare fortunate to have so many fine choices today. But I do want toaffirm that many of us are thrilled with the XSi, and even our kitlenses. The XSi received "highly recommended" at this site and therating is well deserved..

As have other cameras..

However, one should be infromed of potential problems, especially when those problems are passed on from generation to generation..

Gail ~ http://www.pbase.com/gailbMy digital camera BLOGs: Canon XSi, SD700; Pany FZ18 & more.http://www.digicamhelp.com/camera-logs/index.php.

Shinndigghttp://www.pbase.com/shinndigg..

Comment #30

Guidenet wrote:.

Profborg wrote:.

You can still autofocus on those old lenses?Daniel.

Don't be silly!Cheers, Craig.

I can!..

Comment #31

Neil holmes wrote:.

Guidenet wrote:.

Profborg wrote:.

You can still autofocus on those old lenses?Daniel.

Don't be silly!Cheers, Craig.

I can!.

Ok, so you can be silly. LOL.. Your point?.

Cheers, Craig..

Comment #32

Guidenet wrote:.

Neil holmes wrote:.

Guidenet wrote:.

Profborg wrote:.

You can still autofocus on those old lenses?Daniel.

Don't be silly!Cheers, Craig.

I can!.

Ok, so you can be silly. LOL.. Your point?.

Cheers, Craig.

LOLyes, I can be silly ...frequently am.

My point is that I CAN auto focus those nice old mnual Nikon lenses (and all my old manual focus Pentax ones)..

One of the best things about Pentax is the 1.7x auto focus adapter. Has not been made for decades but that they sell for up to seven times what they did new after all this time sums them up..

Nikon made a similar device the TC-16A (and earlier TC-16 I think) and Yashica made a similar thing as well. They where made at the begining of auto focus with film to help out those who already had a lot of glass..

The Yashica one is pretty much useless with digital I think, the Nikon ones have been used from time to time (with digital) I think but are pretty limited...maybe need modification, I do not know...but the Pentax works brilliantly..

It is a very good quality convertor that with a good lens loses very little in image quality. It means with a stabilized Pentax body a manual focus 300 2.8 lens for instance becomes a 510mm 4.8 auto focus stabilized lens...how much do THEY cost?.

Off course the auto focus is focus limited which is good..

On my Nikon 85 1.8 it auto focuses thoughout the range when set right...in fact it focuses closer than the bare lens..

I am looking for a externally ratty old manual focus Nikon 200 f2 to use with and without the adapter..

Neil..

Comment #33

I'd heard of such a thing. Can it focus to infinity?.

Cheers, Craig..

Comment #34

Shinndigg wrote:.

There are even some who blame the camera or lens when it's user erroror inexperience..

And that's the usual excuse brand fanatics of all types use..

Yes, it can be. But it's also a true statement. I've seen it happen too many times with cameras I've purchased including brands such as Nikon, Panasonic and Canon. I chuckle when someone write that the problem with their lens (or camera) disappeared the longer they use them..

Problemis, that isn't the usual problem, especially when it comes to theBack focus-front focus problems that plague Canon. and it's notlimited to the DRebel line..

I see your point. But the point I'm making is that there are many using the XSi that have no such problems, either with the camera or kit lenses..

Fine images. There can be quite a learning curve when going from P&Scams to DSLRs..

Boy, ain't that the truth? The first few weeks I was scratching my head and asking why I ever bought a DSLR. But I hardly pick up any of my compacts since getting one. I only have to compare high ISO photos to understand one of the main reasons why..

(all XSi'scome with the new IS version).

This in incorrect. You can buy the XSi body without the lens, thoughprobably not at places like Target!!.

But as a KIT, they come with the IS version of the 18-55mm lens.

Yes, this is correct. I thought you meant you couldn't buy the body only. The kit lens adds $100 to the price of the body. Many of us consider that quite a bargain since it's small and very lightweight and does a nice job..

However, one should be infromed of potential problems, especiallywhen those problems are passed on from generation to generation..

I couldn't agree with you more. And people need to know that not everyone has problems..

Gail ~ http://www.pbase.com/gailbMy digital camera BLOGs: Canon XSi, SD700; Pany FZ18 & more.http://www.digicamhelp.com/camera-logs/index.php..

Comment #35

Guidenet wrote:.

I'd heard of such a thing. Can it focus to infinity?.

Cheers, Craig.

Hi.

Yes..

Probably like it the most on my Tamron 300 2.8 and the Nikon 85 1.8 The 300 the focus is limited (which is good), you just pre focus to a different distance if out side the range. The 85 when set right goes from a shorter min focus than the bare lens to infinity, it is fun on a f4 zoom or any other lens really..

Very fast auto focus (for screw drive) as it does not have to move all the lens elements, only the adapters..

Only downsides are centre weighted metering and centre focus point only and a lens faster than 1.8 will be 2.8 due to vingnetting (ie my 50 1.2 becomes a 85 2.8 instead of a 85 f2)..

It is supposed to only work with lenses 2.8 or faster (I think) but in practice works with all my lenses 5.6 or faster...5.6 can sometimes struggle but I got it to work with a 5.6 mirror lens from time to time (which is not really 5.6)..

For once the saying "worth it's weight in gold" truly applies..

Neil..

Comment #36

I actually DISagreeto a degree!.

In purchasing a camera system, the "photographer" is largely irrelevant. What IS relevant is the value or otherwise a consumer (which is what he is at that point) is getting for their dollar. At the point of purchase how good the photographer is or isn't is not really part of the equation..

Certainly the ergonomics of the camera, how it feels, how it is made, how easily one can move through menus and change settings, is important, and certainly IQ is vital, as is the weight of the system and so on, and needs a hands on approach if the consumer is going to make the right choice on the best camera for THEM..

I am being a LITTLE bit provocative of course, but the skill set used to choose and buy a camera system is different to the skill set used to see, take, and make a great image and we shouldn't be too hard on people who "pixel peep" and want the best camera they can afford..

Having said that, and having settled on a camera system, then of course how good a photographer you are will then determine what kind of photographs come out of your camera. The difference however is this:- While you cannot really improve the camera and lens you buy (you can of course upgrade but I don't mean that), you CAN improve your skills as a photographer..

In other words, DO spend time picking the best camera, lens and accessories for YOU that you can afford and don't feel guilty for wanting the "best" camera with the "sharpest" lens. DON'T think however, that by so doing you are going to get great images and DO improve your "eye" for composition and lighting and translating that through your your camera into a great photograph...

Comment #37

Chris59 wrote:.

I actually DISagreeto a degree!.

8-).

In the spirit of an open forum and an adult conversation, that's fine..

In purchasing a camera system, the "photographer" is largelyirrelevant. What IS relevant is the value or otherwise a consumer(which is what he is at that point) is getting for their dollar. Atthe point of purchase how good the photographer is or isn't is notreally part of the equation..

To a degree that is correct. Whenever you buy anything, you want bang for buck..

Unfortunately, a camera kit is not a computer.

A computer - you just look at a matrix of specs - I recommended that just now to another forum..

A camera HAS NOT BANG FOR BUCK. Each model within the same category has tradeoffs. No need to compare a Nikon D3 with a Nikon D40 (let's not talk different make, let's talk the same brand) - A D40 has a lot of bang for buck because it can take a photo just like the D3 can take a photo. However a D3......

Certainly the ergonomics of the camera, how it feels, how it is made,how easily one can move through menus and change settings, isimportant, and certainly IQ is vital, as is the weight of the systemand so on, and needs a hands on approach if the consumer is going tomake the right choice on the best camera for THEM..

Yes..

I am being a LITTLE bit provocative of course, but the skill set usedto choose and buy a camera system is different to the skill set usedto see, take, and make a great image and we shouldn't be too hard onpeople who "pixel peep" and want the best camera they can afford..

Yes, you are not being provocative, this is an adult conversation as long as we choose to keep it at that level and can see the points..

Having said that, and having settled on a camera system, then ofcourse how good a photographer you are will then determine what kindof photographs come out of your camera. The difference however isthis:- While you cannot really improve the camera and lens you buy(you can of course upgrade but I don't mean that), you CAN improveyour skills as a photographer..

Yes.

In other words, DO spend time picking the best camera, lens andaccessories for YOU that you can afford and don't feel guilty forwanting the "best" camera with the "sharpest" lens. DON'T thinkhowever, that by so doing you are going to get great images and DOimprove your "eye" for composition and lighting and translating thatthrough your your camera into a great photograph..

Yes..

Coming back to the point..

Here we are, is the beginner comparing a D3 vs a D40? In general no, because we know, in general, the beginner is quite aware of the price differential - so he can easily say - does he want value for money or does he want the max in IQ (given that you also have to budget for suitable lenses to go with those bodies)..

So the beginner is generally not comparing the D3 vs the D40..

What the beginner is comparing is the same level, different brand. i.e..

Sony A200, A300, A350Canon 350, 400, 450Olympus 410, 420, 510, 520Nikon D40, D40X, D60Pentax K100D, K200D.

That is where the beginner is having a hard time..

Which one - old model or new model?Which brand - Sony, Canon, Oly, Pentax, Nikon?.

Which break - the cheapest model with two kit lens or the more expensive model with 1 kit lens..

That is what is confusing them..

Now in that brace of cameras, there is one that is a wee bit not as good and there is one that is a lot better and there are so many in between..

At the end of the day, my advice to the ones in anguish is:.

A. Read some reviews, look at some charts, read some conclusions. But don't nitpick or obsess..

B. Go hold each one of them..

C. Pick a brand..

D. Pick whether you want one lens or two.

Something like that..

Anandahttp://anandasim.blogspot.com/http://olympuse510.wikispaces.com/http://picasaweb.google.com/AnandaSim/http://www.flickr.com/photos/32554587@N00/..

Comment #38

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