snubbr.com

Custom white balance in Adobe Photoshop
If you forgot to custom white balance yout camera before a shot, how do you fix it later in photoshot? I have something white with a blue hue to it, while the majority of the shot was red paint...

Comments (10)

Depends which version you have. In Photoshop Elements 5, you go to Image - Adjust - Colour and then 'remove colour cast'. You get an eyedropper tool which you click on part of the image that you know to be neutral white or grey, and it corrects from that..

If in doubt (or if I've remembered it incorrectly) go to the 'help' function and type 'remove colour cast'..

Best wishesMike..

Comment #1

If it is a jpeg you can open it in ACR, adjust WB, and then bring it into PS afterwards..

Thurnau wrote:.

If you forgot to custom white balance yout camera before a shot, howdo you fix it later in photoshot? I have something white with a bluehue to it, while the majority of the shot was red paint...

Comment #2

Photoshop CS2, I do not see those settings in there...

Comment #3

In CS2 is states that I can remove a color cast by going to "auto-color" which I already knew about. Using auto color does a great job, but know it is a tad on the warm side. I saw a video on whibal grey cards which stated that as long as the white balance card was in one of the photos with the same light, you can do a custom WB on any photo...

Comment #4

Go to curves (Ctrl+M) and us e the middle gray eyedropper to select a zone that should be neutral gray. Alternatively you can use the black eyedropper and white eyedropper to set the black and white point succesively..

Image control:Zoom outZoom 100%Zoom inExpand AllOpen in new window.

VictorBucuresti, Romaniahttp://s106.photobucket.com/albums/m268/victor_petcu/http://picasaweb.google.com/teodor.nitica/..

Comment #5

ACR = Adobe Camera Raw (free download): see.

Http://www.adobe.com/products/photoshop/cameraraw.html.

Best wishesMike..

Comment #6

You can use any auto functin you like, gut in the end it's your perception of what's right aht matters..

If you shoot RAW, it's simpler as you can adjust colour temp and tint in processing until it looks right (assuming you're working in a properly colour managed environment). However, you can still adjust colours in Photoshop..

If you use Levels or Cruves and the grey eyedroper to choose a neutral part of the image and click on it and then check out what it's done in the R, G and B channels in curves, you can see what's going on. You can also change those same things in the R, G and B curves channels, ie drag the centre point left or right as needed in each channel until yoi get the result you're after. If you have a neutral element in your image, you can click on that with the grey eyedropper as your starting point and then fine tune in each colour channel as you see fit..

Cheers from John from Adelaide, South AustraliaJohn Harvey Photography http://johnharvey.com.auCanon 40D, Canon 20D & Fuji F10..

Comment #7

Thurnau wrote:.

What is ACR?.

Adobe Camera Raw is supplied as part of CS2, so you already have a version installed..

As an alterenative within Photoshop, you may choose a corrective *Photo Filter*..

[Menu: Image>Adjustments>Photo Filter, and select a colour opposite to the cast.].

This works much the same way as putting a coloured filter over the lens of the camera at shooting time, which is what we had to do when we had the wrong sort of colour film in the camera..

The advantage of using the Photo-filter option over other methods, is that it does not "comb-out" out the histogram and remove levels.... or, put another way, it is less damaging to the image than other methods of correction. For this reason I always try Photo Filter before any other means of colour correction, even if I use an additional method for final tweaking.Regards,Baz..

Comment #8

Funny, but Auto color looked better than the curves way that I tried. Maybe the computer is smarter than me:).

I also took these shots as jpg, not as raw. Is there a big difference?..

Comment #9

Thurnau wrote:.

Funny, but Auto color looked better than the curves way that I tried.Maybe the computer is smarter than me:).

I also took these shots as jpg, not as raw. Is there a big difference?.

Not really unless you save and reopen then save etc... each time the image degrades. Try saving in TIFF until the final version..

On the earlier question, this is a quick "auto color" technique:.

Image>brightness/contrast (bright up 20 and contrast down 10 works on a lot of stuff) then auto color.

Then image>fade>luminosity and take back by eye 25-50%? It isn't as precise as curves, but it's not bad and a lot faster.Brian..

Comment #10

Click Here to View All...

Sponsored Amazon Deals:

1. Get big savings on Amazon warehouse deals.
2. Save up to 70% on Amazon Products.


This question was taken from a support group/message board and re-posted here so others can learn from it.

 

Categories: Home | Diet & Weight Management | Vitamins & Supplements | Herbs & Cleansing |

Sexual Health | Medifast Support | Nutrisystem Support | Medifast Questions |

Web Hosting | Web Hosts | Website Hosting | Hosting |

Web Hosting | GoDaddy | Digital Cameras | Best WebHosts |

Web Hosting FAQ | Web Hosts FAQ | Hosting FAQ | Hosting Group |

Hosting Questions | Camera Tips | Best Cameras To Buy | Best Cameras This Year |

Camera Q-A | Digital Cameras Q-A | Camera Forum | Nov 2010 - Cameras |

Oct 2010 - Cameras | Oct 2010 - DSLRs | Oct 2010 - Camera Tips | Sep 2010 - Cameras |

Sep 2010 - DSLRS | Sep 2010 - Camera Tips | Aug 2010 - Cameras | Aug 2010 - DSLR Tips |

Aug 2010 - Camera Tips | July 2010 - Cameras | July 2010 - Nikon Cameras | July 2010 - Canon Cameras |

July 2010 - Pentax Cameras | Medifast Recipes | Medifast Recipes Tips | Medifast Recipes Strategies |

Medifast Recipes Experiences | Medifast Recipes Group | Medifast Recipes Forum | Medifast Support Strategies |

Medifast Support Experiences |

 

(C) Copyright 2010 All rights reserved.