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Custom WB???
Hi. I just bought Canon XTI. I am try to figure out how to use the custom WB..

By looking at the menu, I have to take a pic of a white paper, and use that to set the WB. Do I have to set it evertime I take a shot? I want to know when should I use custom WB and why? Or I should set the WB to auto and let the camera do it job?? Help! Please Thank you..

Comments (5)

I've never actually done it myself but have read about it. You don't need to set it every time you take a shot. You take the shot of something white or neutral, set the custom WB using that pic. Then that WB will be applied going forward until you change it. If you change lighting conditions, you should redo the WB or select one of the preset WB modes. You'd use custom WB perhaps when you are in a room with different types of light sources and the presets don't really describe the light sources you are shooting under..

As for me, I usually just use AWB and fix in the post processing. I PP anyway so this usually isn't a big deal to do. The AWB is usually not quite right, depends on teh circumstances though, but more often than not, I'm at least tweaking the WB in PP.Just trying to learn.

Blog: http://novicephotog.blogspot.com/Flickr: http://www.flickr.com/photos/9778447@N07/..

Comment #1

Gonein99sec wrote:.

Hi. I just bought Canon XTI. I am try to figure out how to use thecustom WB.By looking at the menu, I have to take a pic of a white paper, and.

Or the light source itself..

Use that to set the WB. Do I have to set it evertime I take a shot?I want to know when should I use custom WB and why? Or I should setthe WB to auto and let the camera do it job?? Help! Please Thank you.

Not every time..

(1), it's mostly useful when the AWB is going to do badly see the review, Phil tests AWB or when you -want- the color cast that AWB might try to compensate for..

(2), if you shoot raw mode, the WB value (auto or not) is merely going to be recorded in the raw file, but you can use a different value in post-processing it's not used in capturing the image, but in processing the raw data to estimate the RGB values for each pixel. De-mosaicing...

Comment #2

Custom WB isn't that complicated once you understand what is going on..

The basic idea of White Balance in general is that you want the camera's JPEG conversion to remove the color cast caused by the lighting that's falling on the scene. This, of course, means that the camera has to know what the color of the lighting is..

With Custom WB you give the camera a picture of something that's the same color as the lighting. A white card, a gray card, anything that doesn't have any color of it's own. The object will pick up the color of the lighting, and then you can take a picture of that object and tell the camera "this is what color the lighting is"..

So, on that camera there are 3 separate steps involved:1) take the picture of the uncolored object, lit by the lighting in question;2) select that picture as being the reference for Custom WB; and3) select Custom WB for the pictures that you take under that lighting..

On simpler cameras this is a single step. But by breaking it up into 3 steps you get more flexibility. For example: suppose you were shooting a wedding, and had to deal with fluorescent lights in one place and incandescent in another. You could take both reference shots first and leave them on your card. Then when you moved from one lighting to another, you could redo step 2 to select the reference shot for the new lighting. Then suppose you move out into daylight and switch to AWB, then back in to where you were and you can just do step 3 to reselect the last Custom WB..

Side note: rather than taking a picture of an object that is picking up the color of the lighting, some people use systems such as ExpoDisk where you basically are pointing the camera right at the lighting. It's still the same idea: you're taking a photo of something that has the same color as the lightingthe color that you want removed from the photos...

Comment #3

Thanks everyone. I took some practice shots with custom WB. It makes a different in indoor pics. I think I need more practice. Thanks..

Comment #4

I wouldn't worry about WB while taking pictures: just shoot in RAW and fine-tune WB when processing it. At least on your computer monitor you will much better see what you're doing, than on the camera monitor. For a complicated lighting situation like this one:.

Image control:Zoom outZoom 100%Zoom inExpand AllOpen in new window.

You could probably say there is no "correct" WB, just what's most pleasing to the eye..

Http://lordofthelens.smugmug.com/..

Comment #5

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This question was taken from a support group/message board and re-posted here so others can learn from it.

 

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