snubbr.com

Colour space of XP platforms/Lightroom
Hi,.

Can anyone tell me what colour space the Winodws picture and fax viewer uses?.

What is the colour space used by Lightroom and can it be changed?.

Peter..

Comments (7)

Peter wrote:.

Hi,.

Can anyone tell me what colour space the Winodws picture and faxviewer uses?.

SRGB.

What is the colour space used by Lightroom and can it be changed?.

As far as I remember, sRGB, aRGB, ProPhotoRGB. It can be changed...

Comment #1

Peter wrote:.

Hi,.

Can anyone tell me what colour space the Winodws picture and faxviewer uses?.

Are these applications even color management aware? Do they recognize profiles and color spaces?.

Leonhttp://homepage.mac.com/leonwittwer/landscapes.htm..

Comment #2

Devnull wrote:.

Peter wrote:.

Hi,.

Can anyone tell me what colour space the Winodws picture and faxviewer uses?.

SRGB.

Nope! XP and earlier don't HAVE any sort of built in color management. That's why the applications have to provide it. You get what you get!.

What is the colour space used by Lightroom and can it be changed?.

As far as I remember, sRGB, aRGB, ProPhotoRGB. It can be changed..

Lightroom is ProPhoto ONLY, you can Export a photo in a diffent color space, but when in Lightroom, it's ProPhoto - Take it or leave it.STOP Global Stasis! Change is good!.

Now that you've judged the quality of my typing, take a look at my photos..http://www.photo.net/photos/GlenBarrington..

Comment #3

Glen Barrington wrote:.

Devnull wrote:.

Peter wrote:.

Hi,.

Can anyone tell me what colour space the Winodws picture and faxviewer uses?.

SRGB.

Nope! XP and earlier don't HAVE any sort of built in colormanagement. That's why the applications have to provide it. You getwhat you get!.

AFAIK, you are right. However, it works as if it was only sRGB enabled..

What is the colour space used by Lightroom and can it be changed?.

As far as I remember, sRGB, aRGB, ProPhotoRGB. It can be changed..

Lightroom is ProPhoto ONLY, you can Export a photo in a diffentcolor space, but when in Lightroom, it's ProPhoto - Take it or leaveit..

Hmmm... I see your point. Or I think I see it. You are saying that any application works ONLY in a color space - and that color space is the largest space the application is aware of - ProPhoto, in the case of Lightroom, other RGB spaces being subsets of ProPhoto? Did I get it right?.

STOP Global Stasis! Change is good!.

Now that you've judged the quality of my typing, take a look at myphotos..http://www.photo.net/photos/GlenBarrington..

Comment #4

The uncalibrated PC has no true colorspace, the blue it puts out today is not necessarily the same blue it puts out tomorrow, it's usually pretty close but no guarantees. And then the monitor also gets a 'say' in how that blue is displayed. The thing about calibration tools is that they force the PC to behave a bit more civilized and forces more consistency into the PC. Of course that is an extremely simple explanation and leaves a LOT unsaid. And I'm no expert in color management, anyway, so I leave it to those who are, to take you deeper into this issue..

Now, when Lightroom exports a photo with a specific color space, that really has nothing to do with color management. All that means is Lightroom tried to make the colors translate from ProColor to their nearest equivalents in whatever colorspace you have selected..

If you open that exported photo in an application that is not color managed, say, Internet Explorer for example, it is still just chance that determines how that photo gets displayed. But if you open that photo in an application that is color managed (AND if it is properly set up for that color space), it will attempt to render those colors in a manner consistent with what you saw in lightroom filtered through the conversion process from Procolor to your colorspace of choice. that is, if a specific color in ProColor doesn't exist in the new colorspace, then Lightroom tries to assign that color to the nearest color that DOES exist in that colorspace..

Opening a photo created in a specific colorspace in a color managed application that is set up for a different color space again opens you up to chance. Color management only works if all the links in the chain remain unbroken.STOP Global Stasis! Change is good!.

Now that you've judged the quality of my typing, take a look at my photos..http://www.photo.net/photos/GlenBarrington..

Comment #5

I fully agree on what you say..

However, this being the beginner's forum and the question being badly formulated, I read it as: "what colorspaces cand windows picture manager and lightroom display". Nothing about color management..

Of course, without color management, it makes little sense to speak about colorspaces..

I felt that the OP had problems like selecting Adobe RGB in camera or converter and then displaying the resulting jpg in a windows browser..

/d/n..

Comment #6

Glen Barrington wrote:.

Devnull wrote:.

Peter wrote:.

Hi,.

Can anyone tell me what colour space the Winodws picture and faxviewer uses?.

SRGB.

Nope! XP and earlier don't HAVE any sort of built in colormanagement. That's why the applications have to provide it. You getwhat you get!.

I just want to clarify this for the benefit of other readers. Windows Picture and Fax Viewer, in common with most non-specialist software, is not colour space aware, so in that sense devnull is wrong to say sRGB and Glen is right. But....

Neither Windows itself, nor applications like Windows Picture and Fax Viewer and (more importantly I would say) Internet Explorer do any kind of colour management. So if the value of a pixel in a JPEG image is 123,111,222, say, then that is what is sent to the graphics driver and on, via the graphics card, to the monitor. So the actual colour displayed depends on the graphics card set up, and the monitor set up. This is what Glen means by "you get what you get"..

However, it is not entirely hit and miss. CRT monitors do use phosphors of a specific colour, and ordinary LCD monitors are similar - they have to be, since they are a direct replacement. If the brightness and contrast is set up sensibly, and especially if a utility like Adobe Gamma has been used to help with this, even non-colour managed systems will display colours reasonably predictably..

But what colours do they display? This is where sRGB comes in. The sRGB colour space is designed to be the range of colours that a good, correctly set up monitor can produce. It standardises the process I described in the last paragraph, so that all monitors can be the same, instead of merely similar. In an ideal world, a well set up non-colour managed system would actually display the same colours as a colour-managed system which uses sRGB throughout..

And that is where devnull was kind of correct. The colours displayed by Windows Picture and Fax Viewer should be near enough the same as a colour space aware programme like Photoshop displaying an sRGB image. This is why, if you remove the colour profile information from an sRGB image, or if an application like Internet Explorer ignores it, you will get colours which are tolerably similar to the colour managed version. If you do the same thing with (say) an AdobeRGB image, you won't..

What is the colour space used by Lightroom and can it be changed?.

As far as I remember, sRGB, aRGB, ProPhotoRGB. It can be changed..

Lightroom is ProPhoto ONLY, you can Export a photo in a diffentcolor space, but when in Lightroom, it's ProPhoto - Take it or leaveit..

I don't know what Lightroom uses internally but it doesn't really matter. Because it is colour space aware, it can take an AdobeRGB JPEG and display it correctly on an sRGB monitor. The user needn't know what is happening inside the mind of Lightroom...

Comment #7

Click Here to View All...

Sponsored Amazon Deals:

1. Get big savings on Amazon warehouse deals.
2. Save up to 70% on Amazon Products.


This question was taken from a support group/message board and re-posted here so others can learn from it.

 

Categories: Home | Diet & Weight Management | Vitamins & Supplements | Herbs & Cleansing |

Sexual Health | Medifast Support | Nutrisystem Support | Medifast Questions |

Web Hosting | Web Hosts | Website Hosting | Hosting |

Web Hosting | GoDaddy | Digital Cameras | Best WebHosts |

Web Hosting FAQ | Web Hosts FAQ | Hosting FAQ | Hosting Group |

Hosting Questions | Camera Tips | Best Cameras To Buy | Best Cameras This Year |

Camera Q-A | Digital Cameras Q-A | Camera Forum | Nov 2010 - Cameras |

Oct 2010 - Cameras | Oct 2010 - DSLRs | Oct 2010 - Camera Tips | Sep 2010 - Cameras |

Sep 2010 - DSLRS | Sep 2010 - Camera Tips | Aug 2010 - Cameras | Aug 2010 - DSLR Tips |

Aug 2010 - Camera Tips | July 2010 - Cameras | July 2010 - Nikon Cameras | July 2010 - Canon Cameras |

July 2010 - Pentax Cameras | Medifast Recipes | Medifast Recipes Tips | Medifast Recipes Strategies |

Medifast Recipes Experiences | Medifast Recipes Group | Medifast Recipes Forum | Medifast Support Strategies |

Medifast Support Experiences |

 

(C) Copyright 2010 All rights reserved.