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Color Management Question - HELP!
I just purchased the Spyder2 Suite by Colorvision, and have successfully calibrated my monitor. My assumption is that "all monitor output" is corrected to my profile (Windows colors are adjusted accordingly)...?.

When viewing picures in ACDSee & Photoshop, do I setup color management in those programs as well with my new profile, or leave at default RGB? Seems like if Windows is already color profiled, I shouldn't do the same thing in my programs....

I'm a little confused by this... thanks for any help!..

Comments (18)

Mosshead wrote:.

When viewing picures in ACDSee & Photoshop, do I setup colormanagement in those programs as well with my new profile, or leave atdefault RGB? Seems like if Windows is already color profiled, Ishouldn't do the same thing in my programs....

I don't use ACDSee, but Photoshop will use the monitor profile that Windows is using. You can see this by creating a new window and using a custom proof (View ~ Proof Setup ~ Custom, then select the monitor profile) and compare the "native" view with your proof setup - it will be exactly the same..

For Photoshop, you're question makes more sense if you're thinking about the "working space" rather than the monitor profile. Yes, you CAN set your working space to the monitor profile, but you don't want to do that. It has a much narrower gamut than a "real" working space and is likely not particularly linear..

Set Photoshop to "ProPhoto RGB" (assuming your working in RGB) as the default. This gives you the widest gamut in which to work. You then need to calibrate your printer, tell it to use the correct profile and you then should "soft proof" your pictures in that profile (using the View ~ Setup ~ Custom as above) for checking how the printer ** should ** respond..

You would also want to CONVERT the picture's color space to sRGB for viewing on the web or for output to a "generic" printer service like WalMart or Costco..

The best reference for this is Bruce Fraser's "Real World Color Management" but that may be overkill. The chapters on Color Management in "Real World Photoshop CS [your version here] are really pretty good for most of us mortals..

RGhttp://www.lostrange.com..

Comment #1

I'm not sure about ACDSee, but Photoshop is already using your mointor's profile. The working space is a reference to which "palette" (it is really more complicated than that) is being used to display colors. There are really only 3 "main" color spaces to worry about - sRGB, Adobe RGB, and ProPhoto RGB - and you use them depending on what you're doing. sRGB is considered an international standard, used on the web, photo printing (online or in store, like Walmart or such), and on small display screens (LCD, etc). It has the least amount of colors though (gamut). Adobe RGB is good for printing, and ProPhoto falls in this category too (because of more gamut), but I think it's overkill. I know the previous poster recommended using it, but ProPhoto encompases too many imaginary colors in my opinion...

Comment #2

Glitched wrote:.

I know the previous posterrecommended using it, but ProPhoto encompasses too many imaginarycolors in my opinion..

I agree that ProPhoto is an unnecessarily wide space for general use..

With Prophoto, too many of the 3-channel levels available to describe the colours in your shots, are set aside to describe colours that will never occur in them naturally. Since the number of levels is fixed whichever colour space is used, this is equivalent to reducing the number of levels available to describe the colours which ARE in there.... (similar to reducing bandwidth).

....potentially generating posterisation (well, in 8 bit, anyway)...

Prophoto may therefore be considered a resource hungry mechanism for accommodating colours that aren't there, couldn't be displayed on a monitor if they were there, and can't yet be printed onto paper, anyhow!!.

Adobe RGB(1998) is a big enough space for anybody.. at least until cameras, monitors and printers have a MUCH wider gamut than they do now. (Don't hold your breath!)Regards,Baz..

Comment #3

Rgolub wrote:.

Mosshead wrote:.

When viewing picures in ACDSee & Photoshop, do I setup colormanagement in those programs as well with my new profile, or leave atdefault RGB? Seems like if Windows is already color profiled, Ishouldn't do the same thing in my programs....

I don't use ACDSee, but Photoshop will use the monitor profile thatWindows is using. You can see this by creating a new window andusing a custom proof (View ~ Proof Setup ~ Custom, then select themonitor profile) and compare the "native" view with your proof setup- it will be exactly the same..

For Photoshop, you're question makes more sense if you're thinkingabout the "working space" rather than the monitor profile. Yes, youCAN set your working space to the monitor profile, but you don't wantto do that. It has a much narrower gamut than a "real" working spaceand is likely not particularly linear..

So, you mean if I use spyder2epxress to calibrate my monitor and create the a new profile for my monitor, the photoshop will use the same profile created my spyder2express if I use photoshop to VIEW my photos. But when I want to use photoshop to PP my photos, I need to reset the profile to sRGB or Adobe RGB, because it has wider gamut than monitor profile created by sypder2express. Is my understanding correct?.

If I do need to reset photoshop to sRGB or Adobe RGB when I am doing PP. Which one is better, sRGB or Adobe RGB? Most of my photos are just for viewing on screen, NOT for print. Based on my knowledge, sRGB is better for viewing on screen, and Adobe RGB is better for printing. Is that correct?.

And then my next question is: when I want to print some photos online, do I need to open the photos in photoshop and reset their profile to Adobe RGB from sRGB? Do I need to send my profile to the online store?.

Set Photoshop to "ProPhoto RGB" (assuming your working in RGB) as thedefault. This gives you the widest gamut in which to work. You thenneed to calibrate your printer, tell it to use the correct profileand you then should "soft proof" your pictures in that profile (usingthe View ~ Setup ~ Custom as above) for checking how the printer **should ** respond..

You would also want to CONVERT the picture's color space to sRGB forviewing on the web or for output to a "generic" printer service likeWalMart or Costco..

The best reference for this is Bruce Fraser's "Real World ColorManagement" but that may be overkill. The chapters on ColorManagement in "Real World Photoshop CS [your version here] are reallypretty good for most of us mortals..

RGhttp://www.lostrange.com..

Comment #4

Wondchoi wrote:.

So, you mean if I use spyder2epxress to calibrate my monitor andcreate the a new profile for my monitor, the photoshop will use thesame profile created my spyder2express if I use photoshop to VIEW myphotos. But when I want to use photoshop to PP my photos, I need toreset the profile to sRGB or Adobe RGB, because it has wider gamutthan monitor profile created by sypder2express. Is my understandingcorrect?.

You do not reset anything. The working color space will stay sRGB or adobe. PS knows what your monitor profile is and adjust the image on the screen accordingly..

If I do need to reset photoshop to sRGB or Adobe RGB when I am doingPP. Which one is better, sRGB or Adobe RGB? Most of my photos arejust for viewing on screen, NOT for print. Based on my knowledge,sRGB is better for viewing on screen, and Adobe RGB is better forprinting. Is that correct?.

Adobe is good if you are going to make many or drastic adjustments. Some printers and monitors can benefit from a wider color space. Try and see whether you will notice a difference..

If you decide to use Adobe, shoot RAW or Adobe JPEGs..

If you are a Canon user - Canon cameras and Canon's ZB render colors slightly differently, depending on the choice of the color space..

And then my next question is: when I want to print some photosonline, do I need to open the photos in photoshop and reset theirprofile to Adobe RGB from sRGB? Do I need to send my profile to theonline store?.

You have to convert (not reset) the photos to sRGB. Most users have browsers athat ssume that the image is in sRGB. I am not even sure that sites like flickr, for example, even transfer the color space EXIF back to the users, even if you use a browser that is color managed...

Comment #5

Wondchoi wrote:.

So, you mean if I use spyder2epxress to calibrate my monitor andcreate the a new profile for my monitor, the photoshop will use thesame profile created my spyder2express if I use photoshop to VIEW myphotos. But when I want to use photoshop to PP my photos, I need toreset the profile to sRGB or Adobe RGB, because it has wider gamutthan monitor profile created by sypder2express. Is my understandingcorrect?.

The following is a very approximative popularization of color management. Let's simplify a lot..

You have a black and white image and a black and white monitor. The image has brightness levels from 0 to 255, ok? But the monitor is not able to display 256 brightness levels, it's ablot to display only 128 - half of them. If you don't profile, you won't see half of the image brightness levels - because that's all the monitor can display..

Now, if you do profile, your operating system will know the monitor can display only 128 levels. And it will remap your brightness look up table so when brightness goes up two steps, the monitor displays only one step, so you can see "all" the image brightness levels. Of course, the image will be slightly posterized..

It's not exactly how it's done, but it will give you an ideea. Even for monochrome one should consider gamma curves..

Of course, it gets much more complicated with 3 color channels..

That is monitor profiling very much bastardized..

Now, monitor profiling ensures what you see is what you get, but what do you get in fact? We are getting to working spaces..

A working space is exactly what it says. A space where you can work. Let's bastardize again an explanation, using monochorme as an example..

SRGB says that should be 256 levels of brightness, and they should be displayable on a monitor. Good. However, here comes AdobeRGB who says no, we want better color tonality, so let's have 512 levels, and 328 of those should be displayable. And ProPhoto says: why don't we have 4096 levels, 512 in the displayable range?.

What good are tonalities you can't see? Well, for once, more room for postprocessing..

What happens when you open an image in a color aware application?.

The image is opened, the application looks at the color space the image was saved in and displays/remaps the colors so the image displayed on your calibrated monitor is as close as possible to the original..

If the application is not color aware, it will suppose the image is sRGB, and from that it will try to display the image on the monitor. Since the color space the image was saved in might not be sRGB, you'll have color washout..

If I do need to reset photoshop to sRGB or Adobe RGB when I am doingPP..

No..

Which one is better, sRGB or Adobe RGB?Define better. If you mean wider, ARGB is wider..

Most of my photos arejust for viewing on screen, NOT for print. Based on my knowledge,sRGB is better for viewing on screen, and Adobe RGB is better forprinting. Is that correct?.

No. sRGB is indeed closer to what the screens can display and therefore wastes no information. And you don't have to remember to convert to sRGB for application that are not color aware..

On the other hand not all printers can print ARGB... or are the color managed. In some shops they'll assume the image is sRGB and print it as such..

And then my next question is: when I want to print some photosonline, do I need to open the photos in photoshop and reset theirprofile to Adobe RGB from sRGB? Do I need to send my profile to theonline store?.

There is a conversion, not a reset. It might be necessary. Check with the printer. You only have to send the images..

/d/n..

Comment #6

Thank you for your reply!.

Peter 13 wrote:.

Wondchoi wrote:.

So, you mean if I use spyder2epxress to calibrate my monitor andcreate the a new profile for my monitor, the photoshop will use thesame profile created my spyder2express if I use photoshop to VIEW myphotos. But when I want to use photoshop to PP my photos, I need toreset the profile to sRGB or Adobe RGB, because it has wider gamutthan monitor profile created by sypder2express. Is my understandingcorrect?.

You do not reset anything. The working color space will stay sRGB oradobe. PS knows what your monitor profile is and adjust the image onthe screen accordingly..

If I do need to reset photoshop to sRGB or Adobe RGB when I am doingPP. Which one is better, sRGB or Adobe RGB? Most of my photos arejust for viewing on screen, NOT for print. Based on my knowledge,sRGB is better for viewing on screen, and Adobe RGB is better forprinting. Is that correct?.

Adobe is good if you are going to make many or drastic adjustments.Some printers and monitors can benefit from a wider color space. Tryand see whether you will notice a difference..

Yes, I do notice the difference. Quite a lot of time, I open an image which I have finished the adjustments in Photoshop, it just looks different on the screen when I open it by ACESee or online(like flickr, etc.). Also, I try to assign profile command in Photoshop between sRGB and Adobe RGB, I can tell the difference between them, in contrast, saturation, and even the color.(Maybe I am just too sensitive to color, I practice painting for a few years.).

So, if I can notice the difference, is it better for me to use sRGB for work space in photoshop, in order to maintain the consistency since most of the time, I view my photos in ACDSee or online like flickr? Or I should set the profile as Adobe RGB while doing the pp, and convert to sRGB to save as a final JPG image? I think my major concern is: if I use aRGB to pp, play around to get my satisfied final result, save as a JPG, and it just looks good in Photoshop. But after I upload it online or view in ACDSee, it just looks different, because they use sRGB..

If you decide to use Adobe, shoot RAW or Adobe JPEGs..

If you are a Canon user - Canon cameras and Canon's ZB render colorsslightly differently, depending on the choice of the color space..

And then my next question is: when I want to print some photosonline, do I need to open the photos in photoshop and reset theirprofile to Adobe RGB from sRGB? Do I need to send my profile to theonline store?.

You have to convert (not reset) the photos to sRGB. Most users havebrowsers athat ssume that the image is in sRGB. I am not even surethat sites like flickr, for example, even transfer the color spaceEXIF back to the users, even if you use a browser that is colormanaged..

Thanks, I found the convert option in Photoshop...

Comment #7

Devnull wrote:.

Wondchoi wrote:.

So, you mean if I use spyder2epxress to calibrate my monitor andcreate the a new profile for my monitor, the photoshop will use thesame profile created my spyder2express if I use photoshop to VIEW myphotos. But when I want to use photoshop to PP my photos, I need toreset the profile to sRGB or Adobe RGB, because it has wider gamutthan monitor profile created by sypder2express. Is my understandingcorrect?.

The following is a very approximative popularization of colormanagement. Let's simplify a lot..

You have a black and white image and a black and white monitor. Theimage has brightness levels from 0 to 255, ok? But the monitor is notable to display 256 brightness levels, it's ablot to display only 128- half of them. If you don't profile, you won't see half of the imagebrightness levels - because that's all the monitor can display..

Now, if you do profile, your operating system will know the monitorcan display only 128 levels. And it will remap your brightness lookup table so when brightness goes up two steps, the monitor displaysonly one step, so you can see "all" the image brightness levels. Ofcourse, the image will be slightly posterized..

It's not exactly how it's done, but it will give you an ideea. Evenfor monochrome one should consider gamma curves..

Of course, it gets much more complicated with 3 color channels..

That is monitor profiling very much bastardized..

Now, monitor profiling ensures what you see is what you get, but whatdo you get in fact? We are getting to working spaces..

A working space is exactly what it says. A space where you can work.Let's bastardize again an explanation, using monochorme as an example..

SRGB says that should be 256 levels of brightness, and they should bedisplayable on a monitor. Good. However, here comes AdobeRGB who saysno, we want better color tonality, so let's have 512 levels, and 328of those should be displayable. And ProPhoto says: why don't we have4096 levels, 512 in the displayable range?.

What good are tonalities you can't see? Well, for once, more room forpostprocessing..

What happens when you open an image in a color aware application?The image is opened, the application looks at the color space theimage was saved in and displays/remaps the colors so the imagedisplayed on your calibrated monitor is as close as possible to theoriginal..

If the application is not color aware, it will suppose the image issRGB, and from that it will try to display the image on the monitor.Since the color space the image was saved in might not be sRGB,you'll have color washout..

Thank you a lot!! for your detailed and interesting and easy-understanding information..

If I do need to reset photoshop to sRGB or Adobe RGB when I am doingPP..

No..

Which one is better, sRGB or Adobe RGB?Define better. If you mean wider, ARGB is wider..

Most of my photos arejust for viewing on screen, NOT for print. Based on my knowledge,sRGB is better for viewing on screen, and Adobe RGB is better forprinting. Is that correct?.

No. sRGB is indeed closer to what the screens can display andtherefore wastes no information. And you don't have to remember toconvert to sRGB for application that are not color aware.On the other hand not all printers can print ARGB... or are the colormanaged. In some shops they'll assume the image is sRGB and print itas such..

Like what I said in the message above, my concern is: if you use Adobe RGB, and you play around and get an satisfied result. But after you post it online, it looks different and become an unsatisfied image. Could you give me another interesting suggestion for this concern. .

And then my next question is: when I want to print some photosonline, do I need to open the photos in photoshop and reset theirprofile to Adobe RGB from sRGB? Do I need to send my profile to theonline store?.

There is a conversion, not a reset. It might be necessary. Check withthe printer. You only have to send the images..

/d/n..

Comment #8

Peter 13 wrote:.

Wondchoi wrote:.

So, you mean if I use spyder2epxress to calibrate my monitor andcreate the a new profile for my monitor, the photoshop will use thesame profile created my spyder2express if I use photoshop to VIEW myphotos. But when I want to use photoshop to PP my photos, I need toreset the profile to sRGB or Adobe RGB, because it has wider gamutthan monitor profile created by sypder2express. Is my understandingcorrect?.

You do not reset anything. The working color space will stay sRGB oradobe. PS knows what your monitor profile is and adjust the image onthe screen accordingly..

If I do need to reset photoshop to sRGB or Adobe RGB when I am doingPP. Which one is better, sRGB or Adobe RGB? Most of my photos arejust for viewing on screen, NOT for print. Based on my knowledge,sRGB is better for viewing on screen, and Adobe RGB is better forprinting. Is that correct?.

Adobe is good if you are going to make many or drastic adjustments.Some printers and monitors can benefit from a wider color space. Tryand see whether you will notice a difference..

If you decide to use Adobe, shoot RAW or Adobe JPEGs..

If you are a Canon user - Canon cameras and Canon's ZB render colorsslightly differently, depending on the choice of the color space..

And then my next question is: when I want to print some photosonline, do I need to open the photos in photoshop and reset theirprofile to Adobe RGB from sRGB? Do I need to send my profile to theonline store?.

You have to convert (not reset) the photos to sRGB. Most users havebrowsers athat ssume that the image is in sRGB. I am not even surethat sites like flickr, for example, even transfer the color spaceEXIF back to the users, even if you use a browser that is colormanaged..

Hi Peter, most of what you say is right, except for non-colour manged browsers assuing sRGB colour space. They don't assume or use any colour space. They just send unconverted RGB values from the sRGb image to the computer's video system for display. The closer the video system response is to sRGB, the closer the displayed image will look like true sRGB. RGB values from sRGB images mostly look good enough for general viewing on most video systems, but that has nothing to do with non-colour managed apps assuming any colour space. Adobe RGB monitors using non-colour managed apps will display sRGB images very differently from much narrower gamut monitors (and even less accurately)..

Cheers from John from Adelaide, South AustraliaJohn Harvey Photography http://johnharvey.com.auCanon 40D, Canon 20D & Fuji F10..

Comment #9

Wondchoi wrote:.

Yes, I do notice the difference. Quite a lot of time, I open an imagewhich I have finished the adjustments in Photoshop, it just looksdifferent on the screen when I open it by ACESee or online(likeflickr, etc.). Also, I try to assign profile command in Photoshopbetween sRGB and Adobe RGB, I can tell the difference between them,in contrast, saturation, and even the color.(Maybe I am just toosensitive to color, I practice painting for a few years.).

I am afraid that you are doing something that you should not. I am not familiar with ACESee but if it is a color aware application (set up properly), you should see more or less what you see in PS. The difference between sRGB and Adobe files should be subtle..

Do not assign color profile with PS! This way, you keep the numbers but tell PS and other color aware applications that they do not mean what they really do. If you need to change the color profile, use the convert command..

The bottom line is, if you see too different images, you are doing something wrong..

Keep in mind that Windows Picture viewer ignores the color profile. It is OK if the image looks differently there..

So, if I can notice the difference, is it better for me to use sRGBfor work space in photoshop, in order to maintain the consistencysince most of the time, I view my photos in ACDSee or online likeflickr?.

My advice is to stick to sRGB in the beginning until you get a good feeling what color profies do..

You may want to read also this:.

Http://www.kenrockwell.com/tech/adobe-rgb.htm.

Do not take everything on this site for a 100% truth but this is an interesting reading nevertheless..

If you decide to use Adobe, shoot RAW or Adobe JPEGs..

If you are a Canon user - Canon cameras and Canon's ZB render colorsslightly differently, depending on the choice of the color space..

And then my next question is: when I want to print some photosonline, do I need to open the photos in photoshop and reset theirprofile to Adobe RGB from sRGB? Do I need to send my profile to theonline store?.

You have to convert (not reset) the photos to sRGB. Most users havebrowsers athat ssume that the image is in sRGB. I am not even surethat sites like flickr, for example, even transfer the color spaceEXIF back to the users, even if you use a browser that is colormanaged..

Thanks, I found the convert option in Photoshop...

Comment #10

John down under wrote:.

Hi Peter, most of what you say is right, except for non-colour mangedbrowsers assuing sRGB colour space. They don't assume or use anycolour space. They just send unconverted RGB values from the sRGbimage to the computer's video system for display..

Yes, you are right. That was incorrect...

Comment #11

Wondchoi wrote:.

Yes, I do notice the difference. Quite a lot of time, I open an imagewhich I have finished the adjustments in Photoshop, it just looksdifferent on the screen when I open it by ACESee or online(likeflickr, etc.)..

I don't know about ACDSee, but non-colour managed web browsers just send the image RGB values to your computer's video system and what you see is the native response, as modified by monitor brightnass, contrast, colour, etc settings, along with the tone response curve and white balance created when calibrating and profiling that gets loaded to your video card lookup table during Windows startup; colour mapping for sRGb or any other colour space simply doesn't occur in non-colour manged apps like the Windows IE web browser..

Online viewing in a non-colour managed app looks different from what you see in Photoshop, even for sRGB images, as Photoshop converts the image RGB values for accurate display, whereas non-colour managed apps don't convert at all..

Also, I try to assign profile command in Photoshopbetween sRGB and Adobe RGB, I can tell the difference between them,in contrast, saturation, and even the color.(Maybe I am just toosensitive to color, I practice painting for a few years.).

Assigning a different profile/colour space just means that colour managed apps now think the RGB values in the image mean different colours, which is why the image looks different. Never just assign a different profile/colour space if you want to preserve the image to look more or less the same. You need to convert instead so that the RGB values are changed to represent the right colours based on the new RGB value colour mapping for the new colour space..

So, if I can notice the difference, is it better for me to use sRGBfor work space in photoshop, in order to maintain the consistencysince most of the time, I view my photos in ACDSee or online likeflickr? Or I should set the profile as Adobe RGB while doing the pp,and convert to sRGB to save as a final JPG image?.

I'd recommend using aRGB asd you Photoshop working space, then convert to sRGB and save as JPEG for web viewing (and possible ACDSee viewing if it's not colour managed)..

I think my majorconcern is: if I use aRGB to pp, play around to get my satisfiedfinal result, save as a JPG, and it just looks good in Photoshop. Butafter I upload it online or view in ACDSee, it just looks different,because they use sRGB..

If ACDSee isnt colour managed, it doesn't use any colour space. It just takes the RGB values of the image and sends them straight to the computer's video system for displaywithout converting to make sure they look right for any given colour space, even sRGB. Of course, if ACDSee manages colours, then it should be able to give you a dispaly that's consistent with what you see in Photoshop..

Thanks, I found the convert option in Photoshop..

Sweet! Remember, convert changes RGB values so that the new colours in the new colour space are the same as they were in the old colour space (unless the new colour space is narrower than the old colour space)..

Cheers from John from Adelaide, South AustraliaJohn Harvey Photography http://johnharvey.com.auCanon 40D, Canon 20D & Fuji F10..

Comment #12

Devnull wrote:.

The following is a very approximative popularization of colormanagement. Let's simplify a lot..

You have a black and white image and a black and white monitor. Theimage has brightness levels from 0 to 255, ok? But the monitor is notable to display 256 brightness levels, it's ablot to display only 128- half of them. If you don't profile, you won't see half of the imagebrightness levels - because that's all the monitor can display..

Need to calibrate and profile, ie set monitor settings in addition to creating a monitor profile..

Now, if you do profile, your operating system will know the monitorcan display only 128 levels. And it will remap your brightness lookup table so when brightness goes up two steps, the monitor displaysonly one step, so you can see "all" the image brightness levels. Ofcourse, the image will be slightly posterized..

It's not exactly how it's done, but it will give you an ideea. Evenfor monochrome one should consider gamma curves..

It's not actually gamma, but a tone response curve. Even sRGB doesn't have a gamma as such. It's based on gamma 2.2, but the reponse curve deviates markedly from a gamma 2.2 curve at the darker end of the curve..

Of course, it gets much more complicated with 3 color channels..

That is monitor profiling very much bastardized..

Now, monitor profiling ensures what you see is what you get, but whatdo you get in fact? We are getting to working spaces..

Calibrating and profiling helps to standardise display as much as possible, especially with colour maanged apps..

A working space is exactly what it says. A space where you can work.Let's bastardize again an explanation, using monochorme as an example..

SRGB says that should be 256 levels of brightness, and they should bedisplayable on a monitor. Good. However, here comes AdobeRGB who saysno, we want better color tonality, so let's have 512 levels, and 328of those should be displayable. And ProPhoto says: why don't we have4096 levels, 512 in the displayable range?.

What good are tonalities you can't see? Well, for once, more room forpostprocessing..

What happens when you open an image in a color aware application?The image is opened, the application looks at the color space theimage was saved in and displays/remaps the colors so the imagedisplayed on your calibrated monitor is as close as possible to theoriginal..

Yes, within the limitations of the video system, and using available/chosen rendering intent to account for source images with colours that are out of the gamut of the destination device..

If the application is not color aware, it will suppose the image issRGB, and from that it will try to display the image on the monitor..

This is a common misconception. Non-colour aware apps don't assume or use any colour profile/spcae. They simply send unconverted RGB values from the image straight to the computer's video system. Unless the computer happens to have exactly an sRGB response (which they never do), the displayed image won't be exactly sRGB, but will usually be good enough for general viewing of sRGB images..

Since the color space the image was saved in might not be sRGB,you'll have color washout..

If the colour space of the image is wider than sRGB (eg aRGB), which is more normal than being narrower..

If I do need to reset photoshop to sRGB or Adobe RGB when I am doingPP..

No..

Which one is better, sRGB or Adobe RGB?Define better. If you mean wider, ARGB is wider..

Most of my photos arejust for viewing on screen, NOT for print. Based on my knowledge,sRGB is better for viewing on screen, and Adobe RGB is better forprinting. Is that correct?.

No. sRGB is indeed closer to what the screens can display andtherefore wastes no information..

Closer to what most video systems can display. Not wastage as such, but more a result that's close enough to sRGb to be useful for general non-colour managed viewing..

And you don't have to remember toconvert to sRGB for application that are not color aware.On the other hand not all printers can print ARGB... or are the colormanaged. In some shops they'll assume the image is sRGB and print itas such..

Yes, but if you expect to print using a printer/service that can handle a wider gamut than sRGB, then aRGB wouldn't be a bad choice..

And then my next question is: when I want to print some photosonline, do I need to open the photos in photoshop and reset theirprofile to Adobe RGB from sRGB? Do I need to send my profile to theonline store?.

There is a conversion, not a reset. It might be necessary. Check withthe printer. You only have to send the images..

It's always safest to embed the colour profile in your image, but that won't help if the printer only takes sRGB images, in which case you'll need to make sure your image is an sRGB image when sending it to the printer..

If pritning at home yourself, it's best to have the printer profile adn get Photoshop to manage colours, ie Photoshop will convert from the image colour space to the printer colour space and send those new RGB values to the printer so it will print the right colours. You need to turn off colour management in the printer driver so that it doesn't try to apply a second conversion of colours on top of what Photoshop is alredy doing..

Cheers from John from Adelaide, South AustraliaJohn Harvey Photography http://johnharvey.com.auCanon 40D, Canon 20D & Fuji F10..

Comment #13

Wondchoi wrote:.

Like what I said in the message above, my concern is: if you useAdobe RGB, and you play around and get an satisfied result. But afteryou post it online, it looks different and become an unsatisfiedimage. Could you give me another interesting suggestion for thisconcern. .

Make sure your image is an sRGB image for posting online. ven though it won't be displayed exactly right in non-colur manged browsers like Windows IE, at least it should look ok for general viewing. If you process your image as an aRGB image in Photoshop, convert it to sRGB and save for online posting. Easy. Save for Web in Photoshop will automatically convert to sRGB, but if you prefer to retain EXIF data, then convert to sRGB first and then use Save As instead..

Cheers from John from Adelaide, South AustraliaJohn Harvey Photography http://johnharvey.com.auCanon 40D, Canon 20D & Fuji F10..

Comment #14

Rgolub wrote:.

Set Photoshop to "ProPhoto RGB" (assuming your working in RGB) as thedefault. This gives you the widest gamut in which to work..

RG, there are divided opinions here, but I'm on the side that thinks PPRGB is overkill for most situations and often wastes available levels while moving used levels further apart. Some of my processing even results in psoterising when uisng max bit depth from my RAW captures in aRGB, so it would be worse in PPRGB. There are no output devices I know of in common use that can take advantage of a gamut much wider than aRGB, so I don't see PPRGB providing much practical benefit for my uses anyway. Maybe monitors will end up with a wider gamut than aRGB in the forseeable future, but I can't see it happening with printing for a very long time..

Cheers from John from Adelaide, South AustraliaJohn Harvey Photography http://johnharvey.com.auCanon 40D, Canon 20D & Fuji F10..

Comment #15

Cheers from John from Adelaide, South AustraliaJohn Harvey Photography http://johnharvey.com.auCanon 40D, Canon 20D & Fuji F10..

Comment #16

Wondchoi wrote:.

Like what I said in the message above, my concern is: if you useAdobe RGB, and you play around and get an satisfied result. But afteryou post it online, it looks different and become an unsatisfiedimage. Could you give me another interesting suggestion for thisconcern. .

Heh, that's very simple. I don't know about you, but when I postprocess for web, I have in mind a certain destination. So, first thing I do I check how the image looks on that color scheme. That's in a viewer that isn't color management aware.. If the colors are different, I forgot to convert to sRGB..

There are basically to ways to save for web display: save as (which keeps the existing EXIF information) and save for web, which does not. It's always a very bad ideea to simply "save", because you'll overwrite the original..

Now, if you want to keep the exif, you'll have to do the view step. If you are ok with loosing the exif (and I am, mostly, it's usually of no concern to other people if my masterpiece was shot at 1/100 or 1/500  ) you are in luck. When the save preview appears, you'll see imediately that the colors are screwed out. And you'll remember you have to convert for sRGB..

One more thing. You have to realize that most people don't have their screens calibrated. So, depending on your audience, all this color management troubles might be not very productive..

/d/n..

Comment #17

Thank all of you,guys!!I have learned quite a lot from here, as a beginner!!.

Thanks everyone....

Comment #18

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