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'Clean' lense
This topic might have been discussed before. If so, please point me to the correct thread so that I don't have to keep people busy. I am going to buy Nijkon D80 soon but do not want to have the kit lense with it. I would like to get a "clean" lense for best sharpness. I do not need macro capabilities or very high zoom. Which type of lense should I be targeting? I have found nice offers in BH Photo:.

Http://www.bhphotovideo.com/...;O=RootPage.jsp&A=search&Q=*&bhs=t.

However, the kit leneses seem to have "too much" focal lengh range (too much "glass"). I've been told that this results in blurry images. If you could, please point me to "clear" lense that I could buy instead of the kit lense. I am not professional and do not need to shoot concerts, weddings or sport events - I need the camera for travelling photos, mostly landscapes. Thank you in advance!..

Comments (12)

Not sure what you mean by a "clean lens" or one having "too much" glass. The kit lens (18-55 VR) is a very good lens and should produce excellent pictures for you. The VR (vibration reduction) feature should help reduce the chance of taking a blurry photo in lower light situations..

The great thing about today's technology is that almost all cameras and lenses will produce excellent quality photos as long as the person using them knows what they are doing...

Comment #1

I might be using wrong terminology...By "clean" I mean "good glass, high quality glass". The kit lenses for most cameras (especially the lower end Canon and Nikon) are pretty disappointing and even if I get a nice camera body, the images will not be as great as they could be (considering that I am using the camera correctly of course). I've been told by different people that e.g a 50mm "fixed" lense produces much cleaner images than e.g 18-135mm because it has fewer layers of glass inside. Since I am not very experienced with this, I wanted to double-check in the forum..

Miatamich wrote:.

Not sure what you mean by a "clean lens" or one having "too much"glass. The kit lens (18-55 VR) is a very good lens and should produceexcellent pictures for you. The VR (vibration reduction) featureshould help reduce the chance of taking a blurry photo in lower lightsituations..

The great thing about today's technology is that almost all camerasand lenses will produce excellent quality photos as long as theperson using them knows what they are doing...

Comment #2

Edinuser wrote:.

I need the camera fortravelling photos, mostly landscapes..

This is the most important part of your post..

The basic kit lenses are best described as "cheap 'n' cheerful" - they are ok, and they are very good value, but their limitations start to show when they are presented with a more difficult challenge. A prime example would be a common topic on this forum - indoor sports photography. Parents try to take photographs of their kids in the school gym, discover that their point-and-shoot compact is hopelessly inadequate, and ask here for advice on what to do next. Well, a DSLR is the solution, but for that sort of application the kit lenses - all of them - are a hopeless waste of money. They can't cope with the combination of low light and fast movement - I'll skip the detailed discussion of that, as it is not what you are asking about, but it is the source of many of the tales you will have read about the kit lenses..

However the kit lenses are absolutely fine in easier shooting conditions, and that is exactly what you will have. In reasonably good light, taking shots of mostly fairly static subjects, you will see little difference between shots taken with a kit lens and those taken with lenses costing five or even ten times the price. That is especially true if you will only make small prints or show them to friends on your TV or computer screen..

BUT - I am basing that on what you have said in your post. If you have any intentions of doing more - wildlife, macro (extreme close ups), portraits, indoor shots (churches, museums and the like), and all the other things that come up when travelling - then you might want to look further and spend more..

One last tip - it's "lens" without the second "e" ..

Comment #3

Thank you Steve! Yes, I will be using it mostly for landscapes and some indoor photos but nothing like indoor sports. Occasionally I might take a shot or two inside but this will not be the primary purpose..

In this case, should I consider the "default" 18-55mm VR lens or it is better to get the "other" default 18-135mm? If these are not good, I am willing to spend a little bit more money to get something more suitable. Since D80 is not full frame, I will not be able to enjoy the wide angle too much but if 18-*mm seems too basic, I am open for other suggestions..

Apologies about my spelling. As you can tell, English is my third language:) I have to rely on online dictionaries:).

Http://www.thefreedictionary.com/lense.

Thanks!.

Steve Balcombe wrote:.

Edinuser wrote:.

I need the camera fortravelling photos, mostly landscapes..

This is the most important part of your post..

The basic kit lenses are best described as "cheap 'n' cheerful" -they are ok, and they are very good value, but their limitationsstart to show when they are presented with a more difficultchallenge. A prime example would be a common topic on this forum -indoor sports photography. Parents try to take photographs of theirkids in the school gym, discover that their point-and-shoot compactis hopelessly inadequate, and ask here for advice on what to do next.Well, a DSLR is the solution, but for that sort of application thekit lenses - all of them - are a hopeless waste of money. They can'tcope with the combination of low light and fast movement - I'll skipthe detailed discussion of that, as it is not what you are askingabout, but it is the source of many of the tales you will have readabout the kit lenses..

However the kit lenses are absolutely fine in easier shootingconditions, and that is exactly what you will have. In reasonablygood light, taking shots of mostly fairly static subjects, you willsee little difference between shots taken with a kit lens and thosetaken with lenses costing five or even ten times the price. That isespecially true if you will only make small prints or show them tofriends on your TV or computer screen..

BUT - I am basing that on what you have said in your post. If youhave any intentions of doing more - wildlife, macro (extreme closeups), portraits, indoor shots (churches, museums and the like), andall the other things that come up when travelling - then you mightwant to look further and spend more..

One last tip - it's "lens" without the second "e" ..

Comment #4

Edinuser wrote:.

This topic might have been discussed before. If so, please point meto the correct thread so that I don't have to keep people busy. I amgoing to buy Nijkon D80 soon but do not want to have the kit lensewith it..

Bad choice, I think..

However, the kit leneses seem to have "too much" focal lengh range(too much "glass"). I've been told that this results in blurryimages..

You've been served proably 10% of the truth and in a manner that is deceiving..

It's true that using same quality glass a shorter zoom will yield better results than a longer zoom, and a prime lens will yield better results than any zoom. And that's the end of it..

From your other post:.

I might be using wrong terminology...By "clean" I mean "good glass,high quality glass". The kit lenses for most cameras (especially thelower end Canon and Nikon) are pretty disappointing and even if I geta nice camera body, the images will not be as great as they could be(considering that I am using the camera correctly of course). I'vebeen told by different people that e.g a 50mm "fixed" lense producesmuch cleaner images than e.g 18-135mm because it has fewer layers ofglass inside. Since I am not very experienced with this, I wanted todouble-check in the forum..

If you could, please point me to "clear" lense that I couldbuy instead of the kit lense. I am not professional and do not needto shoot concerts, weddings or sport events - I need the camera fortravelling photos, mostly landscapes. Thank you in advance!.

Well, for mostly landscapes, the 18-55 vr kit lens is probably your best ally for a very decent amount of money..

Now, the real important things..

You won't be able to use really good a 50mm for landscapes. It can be done, but it's difficult - your 50mm acts like a 75mm on the D80, and that's a medium telephoto. For landscapes you generally want wide angle - that's the 18 part of the kit lens..

Secondly, it's true that the kit lenses are not the best in the world. However, at f8 or around, the difference between a 100$ kit lens and 1500$ professional wide angle lens all but disappears. And that's exactly the aperture you'll be using for landscapes. Yeah, there are some differences, but are those worth? How large do you want to print?.

Third, think a bit what means to loose all zoom. That means a lot of lost flexibility..

Even with a shorter zoom, you'll loose a lot. I believe Nikon makes a 17-35mm f2.8 zoom, which is a very good lens, as far as I hear. But it's a 1500$ (!) and it's SHORT at 35mm. I use a canon 17-40, and it's still short. Take my word on it..

So, if you decided on the camera, the best bet would be one of the two kit lenses. Try them! And you can add a 50mm f1.8 for less than 100$, and it will be a very different lens..

/d/n..

Comment #5

Why is D80 a bad choice? I am far from professional so D200 or D300 are way out of my scope (not to mention the higher models). The older Nikons have pretty small viewfinders and also do not feel very good when holding them...Also the LCDs are pretty small and is hard to use them to decide whether the shot came out nicely or needs to be taken again. D80 seems the "most balanced" model I could find..

Devnull wrote:.

Edinuser wrote:.

This topic might have been discussed before. If so, please point meto the correct thread so that I don't have to keep people busy. I amgoing to buy Nijkon D80 soon but do not want to have the kit lensewith it..

Bad choice, I think...

Comment #6

Edinuser wrote:.

Why is D80 a bad choice?.

I meant skipping the kit lens would be a bad choice .

Devnull wrote:.

Edinuser wrote:.

This topic might have been discussed before. If so, please point meto the correct thread so that I don't have to keep people busy. I amgoing to buy Nijkon D80 soon but do not want to have the kit lensewith it..

Bad choice, I think...

Comment #7

Oh...Sorry:) I misunderstood:).

Devnull wrote:.

Edinuser wrote:.

Why is D80 a bad choice?.

I meant skipping the kit lens would be a bad choice .

Devnull wrote:.

Edinuser wrote:.

This topic might have been discussed before. If so, please point meto the correct thread so that I don't have to keep people busy. I amgoing to buy Nijkon D80 soon but do not want to have the kit lensewith it..

Bad choice, I think...

Comment #8

Edinuser wrote:.

... English is my thirdlanguage:) I have to rely on online dictionaries:).

Http://www.thefreedictionary.com/lense.

It's wrong. I know English is very inconsistent sometimes, but in this case it's not. Think about the pronunciation of these:.

SenseDenseTensePensDensTensLens.

For some reason the mis-spelling with the extra -e is quite common in these forums. To make matters worse, it is listed in the online version of the very well-known Merriam-Websters dictionary, but M-W is not a dictionary that I would ever rely on. Its most celebrated mistake is the word "Dord" - I'll let Wikipedia explain it:.

Http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dord.

The highest authority on English, bar none, is the Oxford English Dictionary. Every entry is rigorously checked and verified. And happily there is free online access to the 'compact' version:.

Http://www.askoxford.com/?view=uk.

Try looking up 'lens' and 'lense' ..

Comment #9

I did some reading in the other parts of the forum and it seems that D80+18-135mm lens is considered a very decent choice (both in terms of sharpness and convenience). I guess I would target that one (the first time it goes on sale in BH photo:))...

Comment #10

Welcome to the forum. I applaud your choice of the D80. It's an excellent camera and I'm sure you will enjoy it..

I would suggest you try the 18-135 kit lens. This lens is extremely sharp. In fact, it's as sharp as many pro-glass lenses. Because the 18-135 is inexpensive there are other compromizes, but sharpness is not one of them and I don't think the other compromizes are field relevant. In fact, I like the 18-135 so much that I own two of them, one for me and one for my gal. It's the only lens I own two of.



Kit lenses often have a bad stigma about them because with some companies the kit lenses are not so good. This is mostly true of Canon. Canon makes great L glass, but their kit lenses leave a lot to be desired. Canon's new 18-55 IS is a departure in that it's pretty good..

On the other hand, Nikon kit lenses are pretty good and most a very sharp. The 18-70 and 18-135 have reputations of being extremely sharp, and I concur with the latter..

My gal took this with an 18-135 and her D40 last week. Its also severely cropped yet still pretty sharp..

Image control:Zoom outZoom 100%Zoom inExpand AllOpen in new window..

Comment #11

Thank you all for the suggestions! I believe I have the "base" now to start developing my hobby:)..

Comment #12

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