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Camera recommendations for person with reduced motor skills?
Hi.

A friend's father has been a keen 35mm photographer in the past, culminating in /img/avatar2.jpgship of a Canon EOS 30 and some decent lenses. Unfortunately he has been very unwell recently and though recovering slowly, he has severe problems with mobility and motor skills (use of hands)..

Particularly, gripping and twisting actions such as needed to change lenses or turn dials on an SLR are difficult, and the weight is also an issue, so we're looking into replacements and it makes sense to go digital..

So coming from SLR the important considerations, in addition to the ease of handling, are image quality, and I don't think he'll accept less than full manual control..

This rules out pretty much all small compact cameras as they would be would be impossibly fiddly and probably too big a step down in image quality anyway. Changing batteries and memory cards are also considerations, but not so critical as his wife can probably help with that when he gets home. Budget is not very important, within reason..

Can anyone suggest some models we should look at?.

ThanksMartin..

Comments (8)

What about Canon G9? Best P&S with 6x zoom sharp lens with I.S., good IQ & Raw mode, full manual modes, great handling and compact szie.Next is A650IS with swivel LCD and a bit larger.Cheaper options are A720IS, A570IS.

Martin Pitwood wrote:.

This rules out pretty much all small compact cameras as they would bewould be impossibly fiddly and probably too big a step down in imagequality anyway. Changing batteries and memory cards are alsoconsiderations, but not so critical as his wife can probably helpwith that when he gets home. Budget is not very important, withinreason..

Best Wishes, Ajayhttp://picasaweb.google.com/ajay0612..

Comment #1

Look into the Panasonic FZ50. The zoom and focus rings on the lens could be easier for him than the methods used on most other non-DSLRs..

You might also consider the use of a tripod and remote shutter release..

Joel Orlinsky.

Image control:Zoom outZoom 100%Zoom inExpand AllOpen in new window..

Comment #2

Many of these cameras as so menu driven that it will quickly drive him crazy. I think what might be best would be a DSLR that is known to take shots really well in it's various program modes whilst also offering intuitive full manual control and in-camera image stabilisation. This camera might well be the Sony Alpha 700 DSLR..

It may be helpful to control it with some kind of remote device and if you search the web you'll find several aids available including bite-operated switches..

If money was no obstacle then you could get a Canon (or Nikon) DSLR and fit it with an image stabilised lens. Canon 40D would probably keep him happy..

Much will depend on how able he is to work the control wheels. It may be that he cannot do this at all, in which case consideration should be given to another person who might be helping him. What kind of camera might that person be most familiar with?.

John.Please visit me at:http://www.pbase.com/johnfr/backtothebridgehttp://www.pbase.com/johnfr/digital_dartmoor..

Comment #3

For small and light, Olympus E510/410 are the lightest dSLRs and if cost is truly not a big issue think about a Leica M8..

But a lot depends on what weakness vs clumsiness vs ataxia he has and what muscles are most affected. If he has a lot of finger weakness a small camera might be harder to use than a dSLR - and the G9 would be worse than others because of it's poor grip. A monopod could be used to support a camera's weight (and doubles as a walking stick), and then a dSLR is effectively no heavier than a compact...

Comment #4

Here's an idea : get a nearly full auto with good IQ, for example the Fuji F40fd, and buy it's underwater case. They are designed to be used with gloves, controls are big, and they'll protect the camera a little in case of fall..

Martin Pitwood wrote:.

Hi.

A friend's father has been a keen 35mm photographer in the past,culminating in ownership of a Canon EOS 30 and some decent lenses.Unfortunately he has been very unwell recently and though recoveringslowly, he has severe problems with mobility and motor skills (use ofhands)..

Particularly, gripping and twisting actions such as needed to changelenses or turn dials on an SLR are difficult, and the weight is alsoan issue, so we're looking into replacements and it makes sense to godigital..

So coming from SLR the important considerations, in addition to theease of handling, are image quality, and I don't think he'll acceptless than full manual control..

This rules out pretty much all small compact cameras as they would bewould be impossibly fiddly and probably too big a step down in imagequality anyway. Changing batteries and memory cards are alsoconsiderations, but not so critical as his wife can probably helpwith that when he gets home. Budget is not very important, withinreason..

Can anyone suggest some models we should look at?.

ThanksMartin..

Comment #5

Hi.

Thanks for all the responses - some great ideas and interesting food for thought there. I think I need to go back and discuss this with the person involved to get an idea which of these approaches might be most suitable..

In the meantime please feel free to add anything else that you might think of..

CheersMartin..

Comment #6

Martin, I have not read the other replies, but did anyone suggest a movie camera?.

I just got a Canon video camera with a uig movable vioewfinder(LCD screen) and a little remote control that looks like a television remote control, but a lot smaller..

And it takes still photos, saving them on a mini-SD card..

It might be possible to hold the camera on your lap, and look down on the viewfinder, solving that problem, and perhaps pressing a button on the remote would be ewasier than twisthing knobs and switches on a regular still camera..

BAK..

Comment #7

How is the strength in his arms? The camera's weight may be an issue if it's hard for him to hold heavy items. My sister is disabled - she can't raise her arms above her head, which makes looking through the optical viewfinder difficult. So I got her a Canon SD870 that has a large 3" lcd viewer. She can take pictures without raising the camera to eye level...

Comment #8

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