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Camera for real estate - suggestions appreciated..
Hi everyone,.

I do real estate in Wisconsin, and was wondering if anyone had any suggestions for the right camera for me. I went looking at the local best buy and started to do some research online, but I really couldn't find a camera that jumped out at me and had all the features I was looking for. Here is what I'm looking for in a camera..

1.) A wide angle lens so I can take a picture of the whole room, even if it is small. I don't like the fish eye look for house shots. So a camera that can take a wide shot from very close would be perfect..

2.) The Camera doesn't need to accept the highest megapixels considering that there is a 200kb photo size limit that MLS (The Wisconsin Real estate listing service) can accept..

3.) A camera that works well in dim and bright lighting conditions is perfect considering I can't control the weather and lighting in the houses when I arrive there..

4.) Not the most important feature, but I've been considering doing 360 degree shots so a camera with stitch assist would work very well..

Again because of the small image size restraints for online posting I don't think I'll need the most expensive camera, but I'm not necessarily averse to spending money for a camera if it is worth it..

Thanks for any help or suggestions in my search!..

Comments (14)

Reading between the lines you want a :.

(a) a compact camera with a wide angle lens(b) cheap if possible, but capable and you will spend more if it's worth it(c) it's for real estate shots on the web, maybe small pictures in brochures(d) you need to be able to photograph interiors with natural light(e) you need to be able to shoot exteriors with minimal distortion.

Some inferences :.

You don't need a large print or display and you just need a simple shot. Low distortion is good enough, you don't need perfection. Out of the camera shots are preferred because post processing is not what you want to do..

Panoramas ( stitching together shots ) can be done using various software. Canon cameras come with their own software for this, and there are tools like Hugin ( free ) and others than you can download and use relatively easily. For your needs this software will be fine..

First off what you need to know is this :.

(1) Simple technique for shooting static scenes like rooms in low light.

- use a tripod or a gorillapod or similar so you can keep the camera fixed for a longish exposure.

- use the camera timer to shoot as this avoids shaking ( even if your camera has IS )..

- as bizarre as it seems, turn off IS when using the tripod ( yep, that correct )- set ISO to 100 ( or 80 if your camera uses it )- use 'P' mode ( like auto but lets you choose ISO )- make sure you set white balance correctly ( ask about this later or read up ).

This basically gets you a shot with minimal noise ( because you use low ISO ). As nothing is moving it doesn't matter you had to expose the shot for e.g. two seconds and there's no shake because of the tripod or gorillapod..

(2) Avoiding over and over exposure..

- if there is a bright light source ( like a window ) or a lamp in the shot use the rest of the room to get exposure. You can also use automatic exposure and take a few shots using exposure compensation to correct the exposure to your liking. It is well worthwhile using exposure bracketing in these conditions. This is very easy and takes two or three shots at different exposure level automatically so you can pick the most suitable. Don't panic if this sounds complicated. It's not and a little practice will make it seem very trivial indeed..

(3) Wide angles distort.

- some cameras and lenses are worse than others, so we will be using this as your main criteria for choosing..

Now this applies to any camera so it's simply a matter of selection..

I would suggest you look very closely at the Panasonic TZ5, TZ4 and the older TZ3. For the specific task you describe and using the technique I describe, these will be very good choices..

Specifically they offer you lower lens distortions ( CA, purple fringing and geometric ) than other similar cameras. The images at ISO 100 are fine for your needs..

The TZ5 and TZ4 are otherwise quite useful compact cameras and you'll probably find them fine for general photography as long as you don't pixel peep. I don't think the TZ3 has as much utility because this camera, while otherwise quite similar, has poorer performance when you raise ISO..

The TZ4 and TZ5 also have a mode called intelligent lighting, which is useful in high contrast scenes..

You may hear suggestions for various cameras, especially Ricoh cameras. Now I loath these, although others don't. My main objection is that, for your specific purpose, they are not as well tailored to your needs (IMO)..

Bare in mind no camera is perfect, but I feel these might be suited to your needs..

As an alternative I'd suggest you consider the Canon SD870, which is a better all round camera, has a wide angle but produces photos with more distortions. However you may not see those distortions in small reproductions such as you want..

In summary :.

(a) a panasonic TZ4 or TZ5.

(b) get a basic tripod or a gorillapod ( these look cheesy but are great with small cameras )(c) remember the technique ( regardless of camera )(d) use Hugin for panoramas if your camera does not have software to do it.

Good luck..

StephenG.

Fuji S3 ProPentax K100DFuji S9600Fuji E900PCLinuxOS..

Comment #1

If distortion is an obsession, Nikons have a builtin tool to correct for this!.

"www.dpreview.com/reviews/Nikonp5100/samples/Distortion/Nikon_P5100_dist_wide_DC.JPG".

In my view the builtin panorama assist is a useful feature. As these do a number of things for you: Unique file names so the specific panorama shots jump out on a file list - Lock in the exposure from the first frame for the following shots - Similarly lock in the focus and zoom. Of course you can make those moves yourself with the camera's controls, but it's a definite convenience to have the camera take care of this for you. If the camera does not feature panorama assist, then it had better have true manual control. As hardly any P&S cameras have persistant exposure locking. Even with the manual control feature you need to be very careful.



Canon is well known for it's panorama assist, but there are other brands with this feature..

Another feature that I think is nice is a LCD with a wide viewing angle. Because, well, it's just nice!.

Kelly Cook..

Comment #2

The problem here is that while almost any camera body will do the job (because you only need small files, focusing is easy, etc.), the best lens is another matter. To fit an entire room in to the field of view you need an ultra-wide lens and what's more, you need one with the minimum of barrel distortion. Curved walls don't look too good!.

I guess this boils down to how much value there is in having better photographs. If you can justify the cost of a Canon 350D or 400D body and the EF-S 10-22mm lens that would be a superb combination..

As sjgcit said a tripod will give best results. However, because of the small size of the images you need, you will probably get adequate results by using the highest available ISO speed and the widest aperture, shooting hand-held. When you downsample your shots any noise issues or lack of sharpness will disappear...

Comment #3

I would disagree that high ISO would be OK..

Here's why..

A typical compact camera at high ISO will badly affect the image when it tries to reduce noise. There are three typical effects..

1.) Color saturation is lost - and simply boosting saturation won't fix this..

2.) Detail is lost. This even affects large scale detail, especially combined with (1)..

3.) Color blotching. In the full scale image you will see blotches ( like little stains ) of odd colors over the images. When you scale the image down these often result in a dreadful color cast and/or the blotching can still be apparent. The blotching is an artifact which results when the noise levels are so high that the camera can't make a good guess as to what is noise and what isn't. There's no work around..

Note that noise reduction software won't help with these effects. In fact they typically make them worse ( and I like my noise reduction software ). This is simply because the in-camera noise reduction has already done too much and little else can be achieved..

The gorillapod is a flexible table top tripod which can also be wrapped around objects. While full size tripod is rather unwieldy, the gorillapod is a tiny weight and will work fine for you. It's cheap and while I would not recommend it for outdoors in difficult conditions ( strong winds ) it's almost ideal for you, I suspect..

Once you've tried a couple of shots like this you'll soon find it trivial. It's well worth the small effort..

StephenG.

Fuji S3 ProPentax K100DFuji S9600Fuji E900PCLinuxOS..

Comment #4

Sjgcit wrote:.

I would disagree that high ISO would be OK..

Here's why..

A typical compact camera at high ISO will badly affect the image whenit tries to reduce noise. There are three typical effects..

I said nothing about compact cameras, that was your suggestion - and one consequence of using a compact is the high ISO problem (another is lack of an ultra-wide option). So by using a compact, presumably to save money and weight, you find yourself with the extra cost and considerably greater weight and inconvenience of a tripod..

High ISO results with a 400D are pretty good, and after downsampling for the web they will be excellent...

Comment #5

Much will depend on the value of the real estate and how much your clients are prepared to pay for your services. Often real estate shots are done quite badly and as it is such a competitive market right now it does not pay to do things badly..

So rather than wasting money on expensive cameras/lenses and trying to do it all yourself - kind of reinventing the wheel - why not consider hiring a local photographer to do the difficult higher value jobs for you?.

For standard shots an entry level dslr with 18-70 (or even 55) zoom would be OK. This might even be something as affordable as an old Nikon D40 or Canon Rebel..

For web only you can get away with a compact provided that it doesn't distort too much at the wide angle end..

John.Please visit me at:http://www.pbase.com/johnfr/backtothebridgehttp://www.pbase.com/johnfr/digital_dartmoor..

Comment #6

Actually a gorillapod for a compact weights something like 50g. A gorillapod for a DSLR with zoom weights about 375g..

A full tripod is heavy. That's why I mentioned ( and use ) a gorillapod. And you don't need a full tripod, you can rest the camera on a table or chair to take a long exposure, it's just that you cannot select the angle you point at if you do that. A gorillapod can be secured by wrapping the legs around objects ( a little awkward but fine )..

Only the OP knows exactly how much "wide" they need and are what they are willing to pay for and carry around with them. I suspect that the convenience of a compact will outweigh the fact they cannot get very very wide..

And for the record, I would ALWAYS use the base ISO+long exposure technique I describe for static scenes if at all possible. DSLR, bridge camera or compact..

StephenG.

Fuji S3 ProPentax K100DFuji S9600Fuji E900PCLinuxOS..

Comment #7

Sjgcit wrote:.

I suspect thatthe convenience of a compact will outweigh the fact they cannot getvery very wide..

And I suspect you haven't thought too hard about the original question. If you can't take the photograph you need, being able to slip the camera into your shirt pocket becomes somewhat irrelevant..

And for the record, I would ALWAYS use the base ISO+long exposuretechnique I describe for static scenes if at all possible. DSLR,bridge camera or compact..

I do the same when I am doing table-top studio work with relatively low power continuous lighting and small apertures, taking shots which will be reproduced in full page glossy magazine ads. But the OP's situation, taking room shots to be downsampled for a web site, just doesn't compare..

How can you make such a fuss about low ISO speed, then recommend a compact? It makes no sense..

As for the Gorillapod, I will have taken my shots and left the premises while you are still looking for something to attach it to...

Comment #8

Nathanlaw wrote:.

Hi everyone,.

I do real estate in Wisconsin, and was wondering if anyone had anysuggestions for the right camera for me. I went looking at the localbest buy and started to do some research online, but I reallycouldn't find a camera that jumped out at me and had all the featuresI was looking for. Here is what I'm looking for in a camera..

1.) A wide angle lens so I can take a picture of the whole room, evenif it is small. I don't like the fish eye look for house shots. So acamera that can take a wide shot from very close would be perfect..

The question is HOW wide is wide enough?.

I think you need a camera/lens that can capture over 90 degrees horizontally. This will allow you to stand in a corner of a room (of ANY size) and take ONE picture of the entire room. There are other ways to do it (like stitching several pix together) but you don't seem to have the skills or time to learn them..

SO...assuming that a 100 degree FOV is about right, you need a 11mm-12mm lens (this is in FF 35mm terms). You won't find that in ANY compact camera. The best you can find in a non-dSLR is about 24mm and these camera are NOT exactly small (Sony R1, Kodak P880, Nikon CP 8400, Ricoh GX100, etc). The FOV of a 24mm lens is about 60 degrees. You could take 2 shots and stitch them and capture the whole room, if you want to learn how?.

IMPORTANT: Note that all these cameras (I think) are NLA new. You'll have to search for a well used example..

2.) The Camera doesn't need to accept the highest megapixelsconsidering that there is a 200kb photo size limit that MLS (TheWisconsin Real estate listing service) can accept..

Unfortunately, all the camera manufacturers are only making high MP cameras. There is some variation of course and I think you are quite correct to ignore the number of pixels...it simply doesn't matter for your application..

3.) A camera that works well in dim and bright lighting conditions isperfect considering I can't control the weather and lighting in thehouses when I arrive there..

This implies that you need a camera with a big sensor, as that is required to get good low-light/high-ISO capabilities..

4.) Not the most important feature, but I've been considering doing360 degree shots so a camera with stitch assist would work very well..

While you can stitch 2 hand-held pix together (once you learn how) you can't HH a camera and get satisfactory 360-degree composites...you will HAVE to use a tripod and a special "pano head"..

Again because of the small image size restraints for online posting Idon't think I'll need the most expensive camera, but I'm notnecessarily averse to spending money for a camera if it is worth it..

Look at some "big" pix here on dpr. Most are under 200kb. I personally seldom post one much over 100kb. I usually down-rez my pix to 900 x 600 pixels and select a 50% quality. That's only 0.56 MP! But even at this size, you can see differences in cameras:.

1. Lens distortions at WA settings often have heavy "barrel distortion". Barrel distortion is just a little bit of the fish-eye look that you wanted to avoid. Barrel distortion can be easily removed in post processing..

2. Curvature of field makes the edges/corners of pix soft and blurry..

3. Chromatic aberration produces colored edges of objects, usually in the corners and with backlit objects (like windows)..

4. Noise in shadow areas..

5. Blurry images due to short exposure times (because using high ISO wasn't a good option, due to #4)..

What you ideally want is a cheap camera with a great lens. Unfortunately, nobody makes that! There were a FEW in the past, but they have gone away...and finding out about what is/was available is difficult. Let me get on one of my soapboxes....

[begin soapbox].

Phil's "Buying Guide" is a great idea, but faulted in implementation. For example, it doesn't let you REALLY ask good questions. As an example, it only lets you specify 3 limits for the FL of zoom lenses at their full-WA setting...28mm, 38mm, & 50mm. You need to select cameras with 24mm and it's simply not possible. There is a BIG difference in FOV with a 24mm vs 28mm lens! And ideally, you want an 11mm lens, which is only possible with a dSLR. Since Phil doesn't collect data on dSLR lenses w/ or w/o bodies, the "Buying Guide" on dpr is worthless for your needs.



There is another issue to consider: DOF. Larger sensors have less DOF. Wider FL lenses have higher FOV. It probably works out OK, since you are trending toward VERY WA lenses, which have adequate DOF, even with large-sensor dSLR cameras. If, however, you were to select a "typical" compact camera with a 35mm WA setting and try to use it in poor lighting, it might not get everything in a room in focus?.

OK...bottom-line...here is my recommendation:.

Buy a used Canon XT or Nikon D40 and a Sigma 10-20mm f4-5.6 HSM lens. Either setup will cost about $1000. Go hold the two bodies and pick the one that feels best. Get Photoshop Elements 6 to adjust, crop, straighten, and down-rez the pix. Don't look back. Ignore any counter opinions. .

And don't get "religious" about your purchase! Remember that you weren't smart enough to make the selection without a LOT of help from your friends...the camera is just a tool. Learn how to use it..

If $1000 is beyond your budget, then hire a pro to do it..

When/if you want to try the 360-degree stitching, write me for ideas....

Charlie DavisNikon 5700, Sony R1, Nikon D300HomePage: http://www.1derful.infoBridge Blog: http://www.here-ugo.com/BridgeBlog/'Experience: Discovering that a claw hammer will bend nails.Epiphany: Discovering that a claw hammer is two tools...'..

Comment #9

Chuxter wrote:.

I think you need a camera/lens that can capture over 90 degreeshorizontally. This will allow you to stand in a corner of a room (ofANY size) and take ONE picture of the entire room..

It should be emphasised that you won't want to do this all the time, but the lens has to be capable of the worst case..

There are otherways to do it (like stitching several pix together) but you don'tseem to have the skills or time to learn them..

Pano stitching is easy for landscapes but *very* difficult when there is anything close to the camera such as furniture in a room. It really is not an option..

SO...assuming that a 100 degree FOV is about right, you need a11mm-12mm lens (this is in FF 35mm terms)..

Something has gone wrong with your calcs Charlie. The horizontal FoV of my 10-22 on the 40D (1.6x crop) is just over 97 degrees according to Canon's specs. That's a FF equivalent of a 16 mm lens..

However.

You won't find that in ANYcompact camera..

This is still true..

[big snip].

Buy a used Canon XT or Nikon D40 and a Sigma 10-20mm f4-5.6 HSM lens..

I would still favour the Canon lens because of it's very low distortion (almost zero at 14 mm, and very low even at 10 mm) but the Sigma is ok and a lot cheaper...

Comment #10

When the lens is available....it is a 18-36mm in FF talk...at 9/10mm it should do fine standing in a corner to get most of the room....This lens is perfect for the type of interiors you want to shoot..

(The E410/E510 will getting a price drop SOON).

....The E420 was just introduced, and the E520 is Very Close to being released. You'll spend about $1000.00, But, you will have the right equipment to produce the expected end results..

If this is your livelihood and the photo's drive your customers in...don't go cheap on the camera...unless you want "SO-SO" AD Pictures..You NEED a Ultra Wide that can capture around 90 degrees and have beautiful details. They will re-size to better quality than P/S.....

Or the New Richo DP P/S with the APS-C senser and a 28mm (FOV) fixed lens.Peter .

Image control:Zoom outZoom 100%Zoom inExpand AllOpen in new window.

Enjoy your photography images, even if your wife doesn't ! ;-(http://laurence-photography.com/http://www.pbase.com/peterarbib/Cameras in profile...

Comment #11

Steve Balcombe wrote:.

Chuxter wrote:.

I think you need a camera/lens that can capture over 90 degreeshorizontally. This will allow you to stand in a corner of a room (ofANY size) and take ONE picture of the entire room..

It should be emphasised that you won't want to do this all the time,but the lens has to be capable of the worst case..

There are otherways to do it (like stitching several pix together) but you don'tseem to have the skills or time to learn them..

Pano stitching is easy for landscapes but *very* difficult when thereis anything close to the camera such as furniture in a room. Itreally is not an option..

Yes, I quite understand. My last sentence in my previous post was, "When/if you want to try the 360-degree stitching, write me for ideas..." I can instruct him how to do stitching, but I thought it was too early to get into those details..

SO...assuming that a 100 degree FOV is about right, you need a11mm-12mm lens (this is in FF 35mm terms)..

Something has gone wrong with your calcs Charlie. The horizontal FoVof my 10-22 on the 40D (1.6x crop) is just over 97 degrees accordingto Canon's specs. That's a FF equivalent of a 16 mm lens..

I used Barnack v. 0.56. It says the following for a real 10mm lens:.

Nikon D3 = 130 deg.Nikon D300 = 109 deg.Nikon D40 = 109 deg.Canon 5D = 130 deg.Canon 1D = 119 deg.Canon 30D = 106 deg.Canon XTi = 106 deg..

Do you see any problems there? As you and I both know, the FOV is a function of the "crop factor". I was making a simplification for the OP. Your point is, I think, that a Canon with a CF = 1.6 gives less FOV than a Nikon with a CF = 1.5. You are of course right..

However.

You won't find that in ANYcompact camera..

This is still true..

[big snip].

Buy a used Canon XT or Nikon D40 and a Sigma 10-20mm f4-5.6 HSM lens..

I would still favour the Canon lens because of it's very lowdistortion (almost zero at 14 mm, and very low even at 10 mm) but theSigma is ok and a lot cheaper..

The OP seemed to be a bit sensitive about the total price. He didn't give us a figure. I kinda thought he would appreciate a low price, thus I suggested a used body and a new, cheap lens. Remember that he is going to down-rez these images to about 1/2 MP. That Canon 10-22mm lens costs $200+ more than the Sigma. It's probably $200+ better, but my judgement was that the OP didn't need stellar performance..

If he replies and says that I'm wrong, then "yes" that Canon 10-22mm f3.5-4.5 or the Nikon 12-24mm f4 would be better lenses. But if you start going down that "ultimate" path the total price of body/lens quickly approaches $1500+..

Charlie DavisNikon 5700, Sony R1, Nikon D300HomePage: http://www.1derful.infoBridge Blog: http://www.here-ugo.com/BridgeBlog/'Experience: Discovering that a claw hammer will bend nails.Epiphany: Discovering that a claw hammer is two tools...'..

Comment #12

Chuxter wrote:.

Steve Balcombe wrote:.

Pano stitching is easy for landscapes but *very* difficult when thereis anything close to the camera such as furniture in a room. Itreally is not an option..

Yes, I quite understand. My last sentence in my previous post was,"When/if you want to try the 360-degree stitching, write me forideas..." I can instruct him how to do stitching, but I thought itwas too early to get into those details..

We should differentiate between 360 degree panos as a valid advanced technique, and two-frame panos as a poor substitute for owning a wide-enough lens..

SO...assuming that a 100 degree FOV is about right, you need a11mm-12mm lens (this is in FF 35mm terms)..

Something has gone wrong with your calcs Charlie. The horizontal FoVof my 10-22 on the 40D (1.6x crop) is just over 97 degrees accordingto Canon's specs. That's a FF equivalent of a 16 mm lens..

I used Barnack v. 0.56. It says the following for a real 10mm lens:.

Nikon D3 = 130 deg.Nikon D300 = 109 deg.Nikon D40 = 109 deg.Canon 5D = 130 deg.Canon 1D = 119 deg.Canon 30D = 106 deg.Canon XTi = 106 deg..

Do you see any problems there?.

There is an issue in that you have quoted diagonal field of view - we should be using horizontal FoV for this application. But that is not the main point - what I'm questioning is your statement that the FF equivalent of a 11-12mm lens is needed. Perhaps you just mistyped it and meant an actual 11-12mm lens..

I would still favour the Canon lens because of it's very lowdistortion (almost zero at 14 mm, and very low even at 10 mm) but theSigma is ok and a lot cheaper..

The OP seemed to be a bit sensitive about the total price. He didn'tgive us a figure. I kinda thought he would appreciate a low price,thus I suggested a used body and a new, cheap lens..

I made the same point in my first post in this thread: "I guess this boils down to how much value there is in having better photographs.".

Remember that heis going to down-rez these images to about 1/2 MP. That Canon 10-22mmlens costs $200+ more than the Sigma. It's probably $200+ better, butmy judgement was that the OP didn't need stellar performance..

Yes, but while downsampling mitigates the high-ISO noise issue, it doesn't help with distortion. The Canon's lack of distortion is truly remarkable, and in commercial terms that translates to visibly better images and/or less time spent post-processing...

Comment #13

Steve Balcombe wrote:.

Chuxter wrote:.

Steve Balcombe wrote:.

Pano stitching is easy for landscapes but *very* difficult when thereis anything close to the camera such as furniture in a room. Itreally is not an option..

Yes, I quite understand. My last sentence in my previous post was,"When/if you want to try the 360-degree stitching, write me forideas..." I can instruct him how to do stitching, but I thought itwas too early to get into those details..

We should differentiate between 360 degree panos as a valid advancedtechnique, and two-frame panos as a poor substitute for owning awide-enough lens..

Yes, but later, as at this juncture it would simply be a needless diversion...very off topic!.

SO...assuming that a 100 degree FOV is about right, you need a11mm-12mm lens (this is in FF 35mm terms)..

Something has gone wrong with your calcs Charlie. The horizontal FoVof my 10-22 on the 40D (1.6x crop) is just over 97 degrees accordingto Canon's specs. That's a FF equivalent of a 16 mm lens..

I used Barnack v. 0.56. It says the following for a real 10mm lens:.

Nikon D3 = 130 deg.Nikon D300 = 109 deg.Nikon D40 = 109 deg.Canon 5D = 130 deg.Canon 1D = 119 deg.Canon 30D = 106 deg.Canon XTi = 106 deg..

Do you see any problems there?.

There is an issue in that you have quoted diagonal field of view - weshould be using horizontal FoV for this application. But that is notthe main point - what I'm questioning is your statement that the FFequivalent of a 11-12mm lens is needed. Perhaps you just mistyped itand meant an actual 11-12mm lens..

Hmmm... I went back and re-read my original statement: "...you need a 11mm-12mm lens (this is in FF 35mm terms)." I guess there is more than one way to interpret that. I was trying to indicate that the 11-12mm was an actual FL, not one that was equivalent to a real FL, in 35mm terms..

I would still favour the Canon lens because of it's very lowdistortion (almost zero at 14 mm, and very low even at 10 mm) but theSigma is ok and a lot cheaper..

The OP seemed to be a bit sensitive about the total price. He didn'tgive us a figure. I kinda thought he would appreciate a low price,thus I suggested a used body and a new, cheap lens..

I made the same point in my first post in this thread: "I guess thisboils down to how much value there is in having better photographs.".

Remember that heis going to down-rez these images to about 1/2 MP. That Canon 10-22mmlens costs $200+ more than the Sigma. It's probably $200+ better, butmy judgement was that the OP didn't need stellar performance..

Yes, but while downsampling mitigates the high-ISO noise issue, itdoesn't help with distortion. The Canon's lack of distortion is trulyremarkable, and in commercial terms that translates to visibly betterimages and/or less time spent post-processing..

If I read the various test reports correctly, the Canon has about 0.68% geometric distortion at 10mm. The Sigma 10-22 has about 0.60% at 10mm. The Nikon 12-24 has about 0.96% at 12mm. All these numbers were from Photozone.de. While the Sigma tested well, it was not quite as good as the above number indicates. They concluded that....

"At 10mm most of the image field is almost free of distortions so the measured distortions figures look fairly fine here (taken a little inward from the borders). However, this is only part of the truth. If you check the 10mm distortion chart below you will notice that the outer image portion is actually heavily (barrel-)distorted - probably in the 2-3% range.".

But for the OP's uses, any of these lenses are FINE. These differences are minutae....

Charlie DavisNikon 5700, Sony R1, Nikon D300HomePage: http://www.1derful.infoBridge Blog: http://www.here-ugo.com/BridgeBlog/'Experience: Discovering that a claw hammer will bend nails.Epiphany: Discovering that a claw hammer is two tools...'..

Comment #14

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