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bluebells
Why do my photographs of bluebells always turn out purple, is there anything that can be done in camera to make them there natural colour.pentax k10d18-50 lens.Jim..

Comments (9)

What is a natural colour ?Is it what the human eye sees ? What a diigtal or film camera returns ?These bluebells ring a bell for me..

There are cases where the human eye will perceive a colour which is different from what 'sees' the camera and the bluebells may belong to that category..

I don't know if there would be a difference in colour between a digital camera and a film camera.Possibly some macro flower nature buff could shed more light on this ?

Comment #1

Both film and digital seem to show them as purple.Jim..

Comment #2

The bluebells ive seen look more purple than blue..

Steve.The camera doesnt tell lies (ok maybe sometimes)..

Comment #3

Click this link and have your camera ready!http://www.tribecalabs.com/dcf.htmlfilibuster (Bromsgrove, Worcestershire, UK)..

Comment #4

LeRentier wrote:.

What is a natural colour ?Is it what the human eye sees ? What a diigtal or film camera returns ?These bluebells ring a bell for me.There are cases where the human eye will perceive a colour which isdifferent from what 'sees' the camera and the bluebells may belong tothat category..

I wonder whether it is a psychological / visual effect. Our eyes work together with the brain in order to perceive colour. In particular, to judge whether something is plain white, we see the item in relation to it's surroundings. This is actually a complex subject..

However bluebells are often seen among a background of green, which may alter our perception. But when seeing a photograph, the background is something else, it is the room we are in, or whatever other surroundings, away from the original environment..

Other than that, there is also some difficulty rendering certain colours naturally, in particular there is a difference between colours shown on the computer screen and the colours when printed on paper. That may be contributing to the problem in that neither the printed nor the screen version is true for certain colours?Regards,Peter..

Comment #5

They can be 'in your face' with colours that pop, but much depends on the species with British bluebells being darker blue and with a lily of the valley scent..

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Sometimes bluebells photograph better on an overcast day viz:.

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More here:http://www.pbase.com/johnfr/bluebell_wood_meldon.

John.Please visit me at:http://www.pbase.com/johnfr/backtothebridgehttp://www.pbase.com/johnfr/digital_dartmoor..

Comment #6

John farrar wrote:.

They can be 'in your face' with colours that pop, but much depends onthe species with British bluebells being darker blue and with a lilyof the valley scent..

Excellent photos, I'm not sure whether these should be named English bluebells. Certainly there are bluebells in Scotland which in England are known as hare-bells.Regards,Peter..

Comment #7

This is a somewhat complex subject. Concentrate....

The Tribeca Labs ad that filibuster gave us was confusing, because they perpetuated one of the most common errors related to color perception. They showed a spectrum of visible light and implied that the color to the left of blue is "purple". This is not true. It is "violet"! They said in big letters that digital cameras can't see "purple". That is not true. Digital cameras can't see "purple"..

Before everyone goes off on a tangent, this is NOT a silly semantic distinction..

The human visual system perceives purple and violet much the same. There are very slight differences, which seem to vary from person-to-person. But in general, they are indistinguishable..

Purple is a mixture of red and blue wavelengths. Violet is a shorter wavelength than blue..

The only "fix" that I know of is to change the color filters used in digital sensors. Instead of RGBG, we need something like RGBV. THEN, the demosaicing algorithm would bump the R & B when V was detected. This would replace violet with purple, which is within the gamut of monitors and printers..

The reason many flowers don't look correct when photographed is that insects have quite good violet and ultra-violet visual capability (humans don't). Flowers want to attract insects so they have developed colors which reflect V & UV. When you take a picture of a "blue" flower, the UV and V are missing. Humans can see a bit of the V, so removing this is similar to removing the R from purple...it makes the result too blue..

Charlie DavisNikon 5700, Sony R1, Nikon D300HomePage: http://www.1derful.infoBridge Blog: http://www.here-ugo.com/BridgeBlog/..

Comment #8

Its proved toi be a very interesting thread, many thanks.Jim..

Comment #9

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