snubbr.com

Best Books for someone not new to photography but new to DSLRs?
This is only my second thread here - I did a search, but no-one seems to have a thread about best books - unless I missed it, so here goes:.

I am not a beginner at all. I have 2 OM2s which I have used fairly fully for 20 years ish. I have used manual a lot and know the theory of exposure and composition - though I am no expert on either! Guess you might call me an intermediate amateur or such like..

I do have a Canon 620 compact which is fun and gives good results - I chose it because I could do some more creative stuff with it..

I will continue to use my OM2s for slides (I love to make a good show), but maybe the time has now come to go a bit deeper into Digital, hence I will be buying a new DSLR in the next few months. I've done a thread on my choices (mainly D60, D80, E520 in the Oly SLR Forum if you're interested)..

Ok...books?I have Michael Freeman Photography Manual (circa 2001) - some good stuff in it.I have Philip Andrew Digital Photography Manual (circa 2004)..

I don't mind a book with a few basics about DSLRs in it, but I also want something a little meatier without being too heavy. I need something more up to date, natch..

Some one is bound to ask what I intend to do with photo software - well, a little but I won't always shoot in RAW - a bit of that and top JPEG..

I use PaintShop Pro 7 and Serif right now, but may well invest in PhotoShop Elements 6, when 7 comes out and it gets cheaper. Essentially, I'll hope to get enough right before it hits the computer to minimise work there as I don't see me being someone who spend hours manipulating images..

These books, I like the look of, but there may be others that are better:Mastering Digital SLR Photography 2E (Paperback) - David Busch.

Understanding Exposure: How to Shoot Great Photographs with a Film or Digital Camera (Paperback) - Bryan PetersonThe Digital SLR Handbook (Paperback) - Michael Freeman.

The Photographer's Eye: Composition and Design for Better Digital Photos (Paperback) - Michael Freeman.

They're all on Amazon and elsewhere..

Any thoughts on these or better books?.

Chhers for now...

Comments (19)

Cant help with the book thing, but one aspect of digital is the fact that software post-manipulation is essentially nailed onto it. Its a bit like shooting colour or B&W neg film and then working in the darkroom on how the print should be..

Its a myth that digital is (or should be) about getting it right straight out of the camera, like with slide film. It aint necessarily so. Its selling yourself short, and Im not thinking exclusively about RAW files either. Photojournalists rushing about with 3 cameras around their necks typically like JPEGs that are sharp with all the colour there and so on. Maybe the whites have blown a bit, but in usual context that doesnt really matter a lot, if at all..

But the serious enthusiast may not be making the most of his photography by thinking it's ok to minimise work in image-editing software. Theres actually a lot of potential there and it can pay to work out a system that allows us to work efficiently in layers with the tones and colour in the image. But for a pro this isnt so good because time is money, etc..

So it makes good sense to include software in the overall digital photographic process, but this can include a different approach to exposure itself. Capturing tones we can cash in on in software isnt the same as how youd approach exposing a slide. Its becoming popular for processing solutions to be be done in RAW software only, but Im not so sure. It will suit some but it wont pinpoint areas here and there that need particular manipulation for best results..

Hope Im making sense! It's just some thoughts....

And I might add that yes, with your experience all you probably need in the book line are a couple that major on the uniquely digital aspects and software too..

AN..

Comment #1

This book was mentioned as a good source of info for someone with film experience (I can't find the thread tho) and I have not read it myself but I thought I'd point it out..

Http://www.amazon.com/..._1?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1214162431&sr=8-1.

I am thinking of getting Freeman's book "The PhotographersEye". What did you think of it?.

Mary..

Comment #2

Snookerman wrote:.

I am not a beginner at all. I have 2 OM2s which I have used fairlyfully for 20 years ish. I have used manual a lot and know the theoryof exposure and composition - though I am no expert on either! Guessyou might call me an intermediate amateur or such like..

These books, I like the look of, but there may be others that arebetter:.

Mastering Digital SLR Photography 2E (Paperback) - David Busch.

I have this and read it but it's not one of my favorites so I am not going to recommend it..

Understanding Exposure: How to Shoot Great Photographs with a Film orDigital Camera (Paperback) - Bryan Peterson.

I have this book and really learned alot from it. I highly recommend it to people who are new to photography but if you already understand exposure - ISO, shutter and aperture, I'd pass on it because it might not introduce anything new. Just depends on your background..

The Digital SLR Handbook (Paperback) - Michael Freeman.

The Photographer's Eye: Composition and Design for Better DigitalPhotos (Paperback) - Michael Freeman.

I am probably going to buy this one. In my previous post I misunderstood and thought that you had bought this one..

If you do decide on a Nikon one of the best resources on Nikon digital is Thom Hogan's Camera Guides. For Nikons this book is a must, very substantive altho it's an e-book I think it's more useful printing it out..

Http://www.bythom.com/..

Comment #3

Hi, I found Freemans book quite heavy. I got part the way through then decided to just pick out bits and pieces. I was looking for a simple book about composition and thought this would do the job. A good book no doubt but not a beginners book !.

EXPOSURE by Jeff Wignall on the other hand is a very useful book for beginners. If you want to know 'how' to take good photos and what you have to do with the camera to achieve them then this is a good book. It's a very good manual for dipping in and out of even after you've read it all the way through..

There are lots of other books that deal generally with digital photography and post production but make sure the book is up to date and you are familiar with the software it refers to. For instance there is no good buying a book that refers to Photoshop all the way through if you are an Aperture user !.

TALLY..

Comment #4

Thanks guys, I'm checking out all the books you mentioned and they looked good..

I'll be ordering something soon enough..

Good pics and what settings and equipment were used are good too - I know some books don't tell you that and some do...

Comment #5

Exposure by Jeff Wignall looks good. Is it a dry book? What are the pics inside like?Maybe it's better than Understanding exposure - dunno?.

Complete Digital Photography looks good too. How dry/easy to read are these, and how good are the illustrations?.

I will probably place my order tomorrow, so any last min thoughts would be good...

Comment #6

I just ordered Understanding Exposure by Peterson because I was told it is easy to follow and good for someone beginningNikon D60 18-55vr & 55-200vrSB400Casio Z750..

Comment #7

OrlandoRealtor wrote:.

I just ordered Understanding Exposure by Peterson because I was toldit is easy to follow and good for someone beginningNikon D60 18-55vr & 55-200vrSB400Casio Z750.

I consider this a really good book and it is one of the most frequently recommended books on dpreview. Amazon show over 400 reviews for it. When I first bought this book as a beginner I couldn't get thru it however, six months later I picked it up again and knew enough at that point to really learn alot from it...

Comment #8

Snookerman wrote:.

Exposure by Jeff Wignall looks good. Is it a dry book? What are thepics inside like?.

Tally posted a recommendation for this book. I don't have it but I've looked thru it at Borders. It has nice photos and seems easy to read. It seems like a good book for a beginner..

Maybe it's better than Understanding exposure - dunno?.

I'm going to say Understanding Exposure is better than Wignall's book. UE is something of a "classic" and might be a better choice for you since you have some photography background. This book would probably be a little challenging for an absolute beginner. It has beautiful pictures and is fairly easy to read..

Complete Digital Photography looks good too. How dry/easy to readare these, and how good are the illustrations?.

I don't have this book nor have I seen it but if I remember correctly from the thread where I saw this referenced it seems like it would be a little drier but I don't know for sure..

I will probably place my order tomorrow, so any last min thoughtswould be good...

Comment #9

Since you know your way around film SLRs and it sounds like you are knowledgeable beyond the basics of camera use, I would say that you should pass on Understanding Exposure. I think I'm similar to you in that I've been using film SLRs for 30 years, but I read so many rave recommendations for Understanding Exposure that I figured I'd give it a go. Its a good book, but I think it's geared more for beginners. Its also based on film use and there's nothing wrong with that, but I already had a ton of books on shooting film and I was looking for information on the differences between shooting film vs digital. When I shot film, it was about 99% slide film, and it seems to me that shooting digital isn't all that different..

For me, the big and obvious difference between shooting film vs digital is in post processing since I shoot RAW almost exclusively. I recently got Scott Kelby's book. The Photoshop CS Book for Digital Photographers, and though I have other Photoshop books, found that one really useful in explaining what different tools do and how to use them. I don't have Photoshop Elements, but I'm guessing that a lot of the information in the CS book would relate to Elements as well..

HTHMarion.

Snookerman wrote:.

Exposure by Jeff Wignall looks good. Is it a dry book? What are thepics inside like?Maybe it's better than Understanding exposure - dunno?.

Complete Digital Photography looks good too. How dry/easy to readare these, and how good are the illustrations?.

I will probably place my order tomorrow, so any last min thoughtswould be good...

Comment #10

I went to B&N today and looked at the books we were discussing. The Ben Long book as I suspected looks pretty dry to me. Exposure by Jeff Wignall which was recommended but as I said is a good beginner book on exposure theory and other aspects of photography which maybe too basic for you. I did see, however; see another book by Jeff Wignall that I think you'd like, "The Joy of Digital Photography." It covers a variety of digital photography topics, looks easy to read and interesting and is beautifully illustrated...

Comment #11

Thanks, I'll check that one out on Amazon..

I have meanwhile bought the Brain Peterson book - which is good. Half basic and half intermediate, but also it has some good general tips and ideas. Plus, I found it cheap!..

Comment #12

Another one I looked at today was good and a little more in depth than some of the others:.

Book of Digital Photography - Chris George..

Comment #13

I'll take a look. My next book will be Michael Freeman's book on composition. (I am basically learning photography thru reading books/internet.) I am currently reading John Shaw's "Landscape Photography" (which is excellent) since I have a trip planned in September to Big Bend National Park..

Take care. Mary..

Comment #14

Understanding Exposure: How to Shoot Great Photographs with a Film or Digital Camera (Paperback) - Bryan Peterson.

Just a bit of feedback on this now that I'm about 1/2 way through..

It's very good. I'd say about half of it is beginners type stuff (Depth of Field, what the shutter does etc), but the other half is intermediate - discussion of different types of light and how to work with the in different ways (some of that I knew as a beginner and much I didn't and wouldn't have been ready for)..

So, you get stuff about what to do with lots of green, where to point your meter at in diff light, different panning techniques, diff types of sidelight/backlight/frontlight etc. And I'm only half way through the book - and, generally speaking, he is getting more detailed as he goes on..

Two more point to note:.

His writing style is easy to read - conversational and yet still getting over depper points (without boring you)..

The photos on the book are very good - often filling up a whole page or at least 1/3 of a page - in many books, you get tiny pics. Each pic tells you focal length, lens, app and shutter..

Recommended...cheap on Amazon, too, I think..

Oh, and Mary - when you do read the Art book by Freeman, can you tell us what you think - ie it's level, quality of pics and how easy to read it is, etc..

Thanks...

Comment #15

Snookerman wrote:.

Oh, and Mary - when you do read the Art book by Freeman, can you tellus what you think - ie it's level, quality of pics and how easy toread it is, etc..

Thanks..

I'd be happy to comment although I just ordered the book and have not received it. I probably won't have a chance to read it until vacation which is middle of July..

A couple of other things that might interest you. Jeff Wignall, who wrote the Exposure book that Tally recommended and The Joy of Digital Photography wrote a review for both Peterson's book and Freeman's book and highly recommended both..

Http://www.amazon.com/..._1?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1214675779&sr=8-1.

Http://www.amazon.com/...lay=public&sort%5Fby=MostRecentReview&page=2.

Regarding Peterson's book- there was a long thread discussing metering which for me had two interesting side notes..

First, one of the questions we were discussing involved matrix metering and metering green areas. The question was resolved when someone e-mailed Peterson who responded with an answer..

Another thing I got out of this thread that was tremendously helpful to me as a "advanced" beginnner was a reference to a video "Perfect Exposure for Digital Photography which was a one hour video on metering..

Http://forums.dpreview.com/...forums/read.asp?forum=1034&message=27664244..

Comment #16

Thanks, Mary. I found those links extremely interesting..

Looks like will be getting that Photographer's Eye book, especially..

I enjoyed reading Bryan's reply to the question about green light too - that passage was one of the most interesting ones in a book that is interesting throughout..

This thread should be useful in the future to anyone who, like me, searches on the words "good books.".

We can keep adding bits to it as the months flow by!.

Cheers,.

David..

Comment #17

Snookerman wrote:.

I enjoyed reading Bryan's reply to the question about green light too- that passage was one of the most interesting ones in a book that isinteresting throughout..

I just wanted to follow up and mention again the video that I was amazed by. "Perfect Exposure for Digital Photography"..

I think you'd get alot out of this video as I did because it expands on the topic Peterson introduces in discussing metering green areas, sky etc. Although the video is expensive, if you think you might buy a couple of other photography books in the future (besides Freemans) you'd be better off with the video IMO. Its worth the price..

I also wanted to mention again the book I just finished reading, John Shaws Landscape Photography. The reason I mention this is because it's something of a classic and because it's an older book (1994) it would be worth it to keep an eye out for it at discount bookstores. (I paid $4 for my copy.) The first half of the book covers exposure and the second half landscape. Most of the book is beginner material but I think as in Peterson's book you'd get some interesting tips from it..

Mary..

Comment #18

I put my vote in for The Digital Photography book by Scott Kelby. Vol 2 is excellent. The first print is good also, Di..

Comment #19

Click Here to View All...

Sponsored Amazon Deals:

1. Get big savings on Amazon warehouse deals.
2. Save up to 70% on Amazon Products.


This question was taken from a support group/message board and re-posted here so others can learn from it.

 

Categories: Home | Diet & Weight Management | Vitamins & Supplements | Herbs & Cleansing |

Sexual Health | Medifast Support | Nutrisystem Support | Medifast Questions |

Web Hosting | Web Hosts | Website Hosting | Hosting |

Web Hosting | GoDaddy | Digital Cameras | Best WebHosts |

Web Hosting FAQ | Web Hosts FAQ | Hosting FAQ | Hosting Group |

Hosting Questions | Camera Tips | Best Cameras To Buy | Best Cameras This Year |

Camera Q-A | Digital Cameras Q-A | Camera Forum | Nov 2010 - Cameras |

Oct 2010 - Cameras | Oct 2010 - DSLRs | Oct 2010 - Camera Tips | Sep 2010 - Cameras |

Sep 2010 - DSLRS | Sep 2010 - Camera Tips | Aug 2010 - Cameras | Aug 2010 - DSLR Tips |

Aug 2010 - Camera Tips | July 2010 - Cameras | July 2010 - Nikon Cameras | July 2010 - Canon Cameras |

July 2010 - Pentax Cameras | Medifast Recipes | Medifast Recipes Tips | Medifast Recipes Strategies |

Medifast Recipes Experiences | Medifast Recipes Group | Medifast Recipes Forum | Medifast Support Strategies |

Medifast Support Experiences |

 

(C) Copyright 2010 All rights reserved.