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Beginner filter recommendations
I'm pretty new to photography but gaining momentum quickly..I'm reading books, visiting nature preserves to practice what I've read, etc. Right now I'm using an old Olympus C-4040 zoomwhich I've gotten some very surprisingly good pictures out ofbut may be getting a more current camera soon..

It seems I could do quite a bit more if I had a few filters...mainly haze (doubling as lens protector), polariizing and neutral density filters..

At this point I want filters at a level which is useful in learning and advancing my skill level, and decent enough to keep using for some time, but as inexpensive as they can be while meeting those requirements..

Any suggestions (52-55mm threads) are welcome. B+W has these filters for about $40 at BHPhotoVideo (it won't let me post a link)would something at that level be suitable?..

Comments (11)

If by 'Haze' you mean a UV filter then yes, by all means fix that to the front of the lens permanently - I've always done this to protect my lens and been thankful I did on more than one occassion although many other people will disagree..

As to other filters, circular polarizer and graduated ND are the most useful. I would suggest investing in a 'square' filter system such as Cokin P - the quality is perfectly acceptable and it will be much more economical in the long run becuase you'll be able to use the same filter on different lenses..

Confused of Malvern'The greatest fool can ask more than the wisest man can answer'..

Comment #1

Good filters. Cheap ones will mess up your shots. The ones you mentioned are fine. You might want to try an R72 IR filter if you are interested in iR photograpy (and a tripod)..

JimOlympus E-510 and a bunch of stuff to hang on it...

Comment #2

I fear this is the filter you are considering.

Http://www.bhphotovideo.com/...REG/B_W_65011396_52_mm_UV_415_UV_Blocking.htmlIt's monocoated, not multicoated..

You want a multicoated UV filter if you're going to use one at all. $40 sound low for a B+W MRC (multicoated). If your choice is a S-HMC Hoya (mutlicoated) vs a monocoated B+W get the Hoya, IMHO. And do get the $5 filter wrench just in case it gets stuck on the lens..

Http://www.bhphotovideo.com/...G/Hoya_528032_52mm_Ultraviolet_UV_0_Super.html.

Your first consideration is good glass and good coatings. Next is the quality of the mount the glass is in. I feel the B+W's have better mounts but the mount isn't worth it if the filter isn't a multicoated MRC type...

Comment #3

I also notice that this particular Hoya filter doesn't have front lens threads. I highly suggest you ask B&H about a push on lens cap in the size you need. Please do use the lens cap when not taking photo's. Please do use the lens hood to reduce glare and provide protection to your lens...

Comment #4

Thanks for the info and suggestions. Strangely there are Super Multi-Coated Hoya filters available on Amazon.com, which *do* have front female threads. One user comments that all Hoya filters except those designated "thin" have front threads. I wonder who is right and wrong here..

In any case I need the front threads, for a lens hood or wide angle conversion...

Comment #5

Coating has nothing to do with whether a filter has threads on the front..

Slowpogo wrote:.

Thanks for the info and suggestions. Strangely there are SuperMulti-Coated Hoya filters available on Amazon.com, which *do* havefront female threads. One user comments that all Hoya filters exceptthose designated "thin" have front threads. I wonder who is rightand wrong here..

In any case I need the front threads, for a lens hood or wide angleconversion..

Some cool cats that can use your helphttp://www.wildlife-sanctuary.org.

Even if you can't donate, please help spread the word...

Comment #6

IMac, therefore iAm wrote:.

Coating has nothing to do with whether a filter has threads on thefront..

Um, yes, obviously. I'm just adding a requirement I hadn't mentioned before, if that sparks a recommendation from anyone...I'll check out some multicoated filters w/ threads...

Comment #7

Slowpogo wrote:.

IMac, therefore iAm wrote:.

Coating has nothing to do with whether a filter has threads on thefront..

Um, yes, obviously. I'm just adding a requirement I hadn't mentionedbefore, if that sparks a recommendation from anyone...I'll check outsome multicoated filters w/ threads..

Talk to these people. Even if you don't see what you want on their web page talk to them. IMO stick with Hoya HMC as the low end filter, Hoya S-HMC as a midrange filter, and B+W or Heliopan as the higher end filters if and only if they're multicoated..

Http://www.photofilter.com/..

Comment #8

Thanks for the site...looks like a good source. The mid-range Hoyas are a good price point for me, and I'll probably go with that for the polarizer. For about the same price I can get a UV/protector in the Pro Digital-1 line, which the site raves about. I may give them a call and see what they recommend. Thanks again!..

Comment #9

OK, I ordered a Hoya Pro-1 Digital UV filter from photofilter.com, along with a screw-in cap and rubber lens hood. Their prices are excellent, and the Pro-1 Digital series seems to be quite nice for the money..

I'll get the polarizer sometime soon. Thanks, it's a good site...

Comment #10

B+W has a fine set of filters. I would recommend the following filters: A circular polarizer (linear is fine when working with a manual focus on a film camera). I would also recommend a set of neutral density graduated filters (Cokin & others make these). They are (ideally) square in design and can be adjusted up and down to correspond with the skyline in a landscape. They need to be aligned carefully. Another hint: If you use these on multiple lenses with different filter size (for example Nikon lenses begin with 52mm and uses 70 mm on some of their long lenses).

If you do the opposite you will get vignettiing. The only other filter I used regularly is a "warming" filter but you can adjust for color temp in Adobe or any of the system software...

Comment #11

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This question was taken from a support group/message board and re-posted here so others can learn from it.

 

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