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adjusting from p&s to dslr
Hello everyone! I've been browsing around this forum for a while & it's been very informative. I own an S2 IS and I think I'm ready to dive into DSLR photography. One of my favourite features of the S2 is the swivelling lcd screen. It comes in handy for low angle macro flower shots and action shots of my dog. I'm looking into purchasing the Rebel XTI but I'm wondering if I would miss the lcd feature since I've depended on it for so long. I also thought about the 40D since it features the live view lcd, but that one is way over my budget!Anybody have experience adjusting from p&s to dslr??Thanks in advance!!..

Comments (18)

DSLR is a whole new creature and requires a completely fresh mindset when using it. While such a screen would be good for macro as you described - it's one of the worst things you can do when shooting action shots. Looking through the viewfinder helps stabilize the camera as you hold it..

More than likely when you do go to DSLR you will be disappointed... until you learn how to use it. Many of us were initially disappointed when we made the switch. Don't worry - it's normal. The main reason for this is that a point and shoot dumbs things down and masks many flaws...

Comment #1

The Olympus E-330 (currently at fire-sale prices), the Panasonic DMC Lumix L10 (recently announced, IIRC, but not yet available) and the not-yet-announced Olympus E-3 (which is expected to cost closer to the Nikon D300 than the Canon 40D, from what I've been reading) might be the only ones...

Comment #2

A second vote for the Olympus E-330 + legacy manual macro lens. This setup is very versatile and cost-effective. Surf on over to the Olympus DSLR forum and I'm sure we can help get what you need..

Image control:Zoom outZoom 100%Zoom inExpand AllOpen in new window.

Http://www.pbase.com/jfinite..

Comment #3

I think you'll find switching to DSLR a great learning experience. I had no idea there were so many things one can tweak to make photos look nice until I started down the DSLR path and learned more about the basics of exposure, ISO, white balance, etc. I personally find the high ISO performance (800+) of DSLRs very useful in low light conditions that were plainly difficult for my P&S. I actually went back and discovered more capabilities of my P&S after I played with my DSLR, but my old P&S just cannot match DSLR for indoor pictures..

I have since learned that the Fuji F series compact camera is an excellent low light camera. I may consider it for my next P&S purchase, but my DSLR is versatile and not too bulky that I may not need to buy a compact P&S anymore...

Comment #4

The first thing you will notice is that you can't do macro anymore: not unless you get another, very expensive lens...

Comment #5

Mikelis wrote:.

The first thing you will notice is that you can't do macro anymore:not unless you get another, very expensive lens..

"Expensive" is relative, also depends on brand. I got my zoom lens for $140 after rebate. One doesn't necessary need to spend a lot of money in beginning to get basic functionality out of his/her DSLR...

Comment #6

LightBug wrote:.

Mikelis wrote:.

The first thing you will notice is that you can't do macro anymore:not unless you get another, very expensive lens..

"Expensive" is relative, also depends on brand. I got my zoom lensfor $140 after rebate. One doesn't necessary need to spend a lot ofmoney in beginning to get basic functionality out of his/her DSLR..

I'm not talking about a "zoom" lens that focuses down to 18 inches (which often has a meaningless label "macro" somewhere on it), I'm talking about a real macro option, where you can focus down to less than 2 inches, such as most P&S cameras have available at the touch of a button, and really fill the frame with the subject. "Real" macro lenses for most SLRs will set you back the best part of a thousand bucks...even second-hand...

Comment #7

I wrote the following posts some time ago, they may be of interest..

No matter which dslr you buy..

Heavily consider the following. there are NEW DSLR owners' writing in all over these forums on this subject.when changeing from a p&s to a dslr, there is a huge difference..

When you take p&s out of the box add a memory card and a fully charged battery you can now shoot and take very good pics..

BUT, you cannot do this with dslr. the camera HAS TO BE SETUP first. you have to adjust the contrast/saturation/sharpness/shooting modes(color style or whatever it is called) to your likes. if you don't it is quite likely you will disappointed with results. your p&s will likely outshoot the dslr..

To setup-you have shoot a test shot make ONE adjustment reshoot check pc screen readjust, until you are satisfied. and you do this with each of the adjustment types. then you have all the custom adjustments in the menu to check and if wanted change..

When done you can put the camera into AUTO or PROGRAM and get reasonably nice shots. I would advise at first staying with jpeg. as you learn about the camera and photography you can then go to the other shooting modes and try RAW if you wish..

Dslrs are made to see the shot through the optical viewfinder not through the lcd. this is true of almost all dslrs including the k10d. there was a thread.

Not to log ago about who would want a dslr with a preview lcd, al,most noone wanted one.dslrs and color..

If you mean heavy saturated colors then no dslr is going to do that. they are not made to give strongly saturated colors. they are made to give ACCURATE COLORS. not heavy saturated colors..

This is not the same thing at all. too many people who come from a p&s are very disappointed in th dslr colors, because they are not bright and saturated. this is because they are and have been using a p&s which has been giving them saturated and incorrect clors for so long that they think it is the right look. nothing could be further from the truth. the p&s colors are wrong, wrong. the camera manufactures know that the public buys high megapixel and heavy saturated colors and is what they make and sell to the public..

But the slr/dslr is a whole different world. for the dslr accuracy of the scene in terms of view and color is a religion rpt religion. you want accurate color that is what you are going to get with dslr. but they will not be the bright saturated colors of a p&s. ytou can with adjustments in the menus up the color is dslr, but it will not look the INACCURATE CARTOON COLOR of the p&s..

If you are wishing to buy a dslr for more and brighter color, save you money the p&s is what you want..

Not too long ago a new owner of a dslr was on these forums talking about the poor color of his new dslr. it seems as if he was shooting on an overcast day. many many people replying to him told him that cloudy day shots give the most accurate color, which they do. he couldn't believe and get over that idea. he also owned a p&S previously.you might be interested in this; which I posted a while back..

Http://forums.dpreview.com/...forums/read.asp?forum=1036&message=23677257..

Comment #8

Mikelis wrote:.

I'm not talking about a "zoom" lens that focuses down to 18 inches(which often has a meaningless label "macro" somewhere on it), I'mtalking about a real macro option, where you can focus down to lessthan 2 inches, such as most P&S cameras have available at the touchof a button, and really fill the frame with the subject. "Real"macro lenses for most SLRs will set you back the best part of athousand bucks...even second-hand..

I have no idea where you are getting your information from.....

SLR Macro lenses new can be had for under $400(I.E. Canon 60mm EF-S macro), even stepping up to the 100mm canon macro is under $500 online. That said even a "true" macro lens I.E. one that can do 1:1 scale will not focus like a P&S at 2 inches or closer by itself. The shorter the focal length the shorter the focusing distance so with the 60mm macro the focusing distances is about 8 inches, the 100mm is around 12 inches..

Check out B&H's website for the specifications they list the minimum focusing distances or photozone.de for lens reviews, with the macro lenses minimum focusing distances is usually mentioned in the review..

Mr. Fixitx..

Comment #9

I don't know if it's true for absolutely all dslr's or not, but most don't allow you to use the LCD to shoot. Just to reveiw what you already shot..

That was the biggest curve for me. I was so used to putting my camera on a tripod and being able to look at the lcd. Also, when I made changes to the settings of the camera, I could see what was happening to the shot on the lcd monitor BEFORE I took the shot. All that is gone now..

But there is a bright side. I have become a better photographer, because I learned what all the settings acutally did and am more in control of the shots I take..

So if you go dslr, you will have to learn to shoot through the viewfinder - not the lcd...

Comment #10

Yes, there is an appreciable adjustment when you move up from P&S to dslr. Typically, it takes months of study and hundreds of shots before you begin getting photos you are really proud of. When you reach that point, however, you will wonder why you ever used a P&S. If you are serious about learning photography, then I highly recommend that you research dslr cameras and buy the one that suits you best. If you just want a bigger and fancier camera that you will use on automatic settings, then I recommend that you stay with a P&S..

Jerryhttp://jchoate.zenfolio.com/..

Comment #11

Jchoate wrote:.

If you just want a bigger and fancier camera that you willuse on automatic settings, then I recommend that you stay with a P&S..

Jerryhttp://jchoate.zenfolio.com/.

Good advice!!!..

Comment #12

Thank you to all who took time to reply to my question..

I have been using manual controls on my s2 for some time now & have a good grasp on aperture, shutter etc....but I really like the idea of a dslr for versatility of lenses and image quality. For dslr owners out there, how do you get down low to get a low angle shot?? Believe it or not this is my concern! I love shooting flowers from a low angle and that's where the swivelling lcd comes in handy. How is it physically possible to get shots from ground level using the viewfinder without straining your neck??Thanks again!..

Comment #13

You either get down with the dslr while you look through the viewfinder OR buy a right angle viewfinder attachment. zigview also has a viewfinder attachment for any dslr which actually is a lcd screen that swivels, it is expensive though. it also has an intervalometer and other capabilities,..

Comment #14

GaryDeM wrote:buy a right angle viewfinder attachment. zigview also.

Has a viewfinder attachment for any dslr which actually is a lcdscreen that swivels,.

Wow! Thanks Gary for that info. I just checked out their website. I had no idea this little gadget existed!! That would definitely solve my problem with low angle shots. Any comments/advice from people using this device...pros & cons?.

I feel pretty confidant now purchasing the xti knowing there are options like this out there. The only problem now is the price of the xti here in Canada. It retails for $855 (after taxes) for BODY ONLY at future shop and $969 with 18-55 lens at Sears. I guess I could always order online from the U.S seeing as our dollar has gone up and the xti is WAY cheaper in the U.S. I also checked ebay & found some good deals but it looks like quite a few are refurbs..

I appreciate all your comments. I've learned so much from browsing this site for a couple of years now and I'm glad I finally started asking some questions...

Comment #15

The Olympus was mentioned a while ago and has the proper LCD that you want. Do a search on the other thing on the forums about it, btw..

Also, whilst mentioning the Olympus I'll add that they do a very nice macro lens of 35 mm focal length and a "pro" grade one that's a good deal dearer. There's a lot of info about them on these two sites and they'll introduce you to the wide range of cameras that make up the "FourThirds" series from a variety of different makers. The sites are:.

Http://www.wrotniak.net and http://www.biofos.com/esystem/index.html.

The second one would be a better place to start looking at the body and macro lenses..

Hope this helps, David..

Comment #16

Sorry, I should have added this link to the 35 mm macro lenses review:.

Http://www.biofos.com/esystem/35mc_tst.html.

Regards, David..

Comment #17

Another thing to consider for macro work is a tripod that turns so that it points straight down and can adjust to nearly any height above the object you wish to photograph. I recently bought one (a Bogan/Manfrotto 055X PRO tripod with a 488RC2 head) that has this capability..

Jerryhttp://jchoate.zenfolio.com/..

Comment #18

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This question was taken from a support group/message board and re-posted here so others can learn from it.

 

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