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A couple of questions
1. Is there any difference between resizing a photo and cropping the whole of the photo to a new size?.

2. When should you resample? When increasing the size or dpi or when reducing it?.

3. I have a print that I am applying a watercolour effect to. Some parts are in shade and so become just a blob of single colour. What should I do? I've tried incresing the contrast and brightness with some success. Is it possible to apply the levels from elsewhere to these parts? If so how?.

Thanks...

Comments (8)

Gashead wrote:.

1. Is there any difference between resizing a photo and cropping thewhole of the photo to a new size?.

2. When should you resample? When increasing the size or dpi or whenreducing it?.

3. I have a print that I am applying a watercolour effect to. Someparts are in shade and so become just a blob of single colour. Whatshould I do? I've tried incresing the contrast and brightness withsome success. Is it possible to apply the levels from elsewhere tothese parts? If so how?.

Thanks..

1. Resizing changes the size of the whole image. Cropping removes part of the image, leaving you with a smaller image. (You can't really "crop the whole of a photo to a new size," since cropping doesn't leave the photo whole.).

2. You can resample a photo to a bigger or smaller size. Just select a new pixel count for the dimensions or select a different inch or cm measure. (DPI has nothing to do with this, though; that only comes into play when you print.).

3. I don't know, but I'm sure someone here does. I've never used that effect...

Comment #1

Gashead wrote:.

1. Is there any difference between resizing a photo and cropping thewhole of the photo to a new size?.

Resizing changes the resolution of whole image, but does not alter the composition, while cropping alters the composition..

2. When should you resample? When increasing the size or dpi or whenreducing it?.

Upsample, when you need to print larger than the native image size at specified resolution. e.g. if image size is 3000x2000 pixepls, and you need to print 15"x10" at 200DPI than no need to do anything. But if you want to print that size at 300DPI than you will need to upsample. Or if you keep resolution at 200DPI, but want larger size than 15"x10", than too upsampling will be required..

3. I have a print that I am applying a watercolour effect to. Someparts are in shade and so become just a blob of single colour. Whatshould I do? I've tried incresing the contrast and brightness withsome success. Is it possible to apply the levels from elsewhere tothese parts? If so how?.

I have no answer to this. Maybe ask in "retouching forum".Best Wishes, Ajayhttp://picasaweb.google.com/ajay0612..

Comment #2

Re #3, you might try building the digi equivalent of a contrast mask. Make a copy and bump the contrast way up, reverse it, drop the contrast and over- or under-lay the original in a new layer. Experiment...

Comment #3

Gashead wrote:.

1. Is there any difference between resizing a photo and cropping thewhole of the photo to a new size?.

As a couple of people have already said, 'crop' means to cut out a part of the image. But my guess is you didn't mean that. Using Photoshop's crop tool, you can specify a size and resolution then drag the tool across the whole image, which has the effect of 'cropping the whole of the photo to a new size'. Is that what you meant? If you did, then the answer to your question is....

There is no difference in terms of size and resolution, but there could be a subtle difference because Photoshop gets it's resample settings from a different place. When you use the Image Size dialog, you can choose the resampling algorithm - Bicubic is the default, but there are others such as Bicubic Smoother and Nearest Neighbour. When you use the Crop tool, the algorithm used is the one specified in Preferences/General. So if those settings happen to be different on your PC, you could see a different result..

I'm referring to Photoshop CS - if you have another version there may be differences I'm not aware of..

2. When should you resample? When increasing the size or dpi or whenreducing it?.

Either..

When reducing the size of the image, resampling (downsampling in this case) makes a smaller file, and also allows you to adjust sharpening (and sometimes contrast) to best suit the new smaller image..

When increasing the size of the image, resampling (upsampling) can improve the subjective image quality, compared with simply printing at a larger size and lower resolution as you would without resampling. Of course, you can't pluck additional image data out of the air, and what you are doing is disguising the lack of data to get that apparent improvement. The best simple technique is to use Bicubic Smoother resampling, followed by sharpening as the result of upsampling is always soft..

3. I have a print that I am applying a watercolour effect to. Someparts are in shade and so become just a blob of single colour. Whatshould I do? I've tried incresing the contrast and brightness withsome success. Is it possible to apply the levels from elsewhere tothese parts? If so how?.

These effects look great when you first see them, but the more you use them, the more you learn that the best results require a lot of hand-tuning and finishing!.

Try using Photoshop's Shadow/Highlight dialog (under Image - Adjustments) to even out the dynamic range of different parts of the image before applying the watercolour effect...

Comment #4

Telyx wrote:.

2. When should you resample? When increasing the size or dpi or whenreducing it?.

2. You can resample a photo to a bigger or smaller size. Justselect a new pixel count for the dimensions or select a differentinch or cm measure. (DPI has nothing to do with this, though; thatonly comes into play when you print.).

When upsizing photos the recommendation is for bicubic smoother.When downsizing photos, the recommendation is for bucubic sharper..

Van..

Comment #5

G'day Gashead et al,.

This link should help you out with Q1 & Q2: http://www.digital-photo-forum.com/showthread.php?t=1809.

This link should help you with Q3: http://www.digital-photo-forum.com/showthread.php?t=539.

I hope this helps..

GBDennis.

'Photography is the power of observation, not the application of technology.' (Ken Rockwell)..

Please visit my For Sale portfolio on RedBubble here: http://www.redbubble.com/people/inport..

Comment #6

I get pretty good results from Lanczos in IrfanView, too...

Comment #7

OP asked "2. When should you resample? When increasing the size or dpi or when reducing it?".

I resample when increasing the display size of an image to hide jaggies..

Image control:Zoom outZoom 100%Zoom inExpand AllOpen in new window.

This image of a clown's nose was upsized in two steps of 2x. Use an interpolating resampler..

Dave..

Comment #8

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This question was taken from a support group/message board and re-posted here so others can learn from it.

 

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