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50mm or 85mm lens for home studio?
I have limited room for now (16'x16'room)After reading quite a bit of the threads here, it seems that a 50mm may be what I need but I want to be sure. Any help would be greatly appreciated though.QuinNikonD80..

Comments (12)

I use a 28-75 f/2.8 in my "Living-room" studio....Zooming lets you stay in the same place..plus it is quicker than walking back and forth...and is less limiting than a 50mm Prime (80mm FOV)......BUT.

A 50mm is a nice lens for head and shoulder shots...But if you need more...you may run out room backing up for that full length..

I have a 50 1.8....But haven't used it since I got the Tammy 28-75 f/2.8....

Quin wrote:.

I have limited room for now (16'x16'room)After reading quite a bitof the threads here, it seems that a 50mm may be what I need but Iwant to be sure. Any help would be greatly appreciated though.QuinNikonD80.

Peter .

Image control:Zoom outZoom 100%Zoom inExpand AllOpen in new window.

Enjoy your photography images, even if your wife doesn't ! ;-(http://laurence-photography.com/http://www.pbase.com/peterarbib/Cameras in profile...

Comment #1

Quin wrote:.

I have limited room for now (16'x16'room)After reading quite a bitof the threads here, it seems that a 50mm may be what I need but Iwant to be sure. Any help would be greatly appreciated though.QuinNikonD80.

An 85 may be a bit long for your room. I feel as a portrait photographer the distance between the model, you, and the camera makes a difference in the result. If you're too close you may intimidate a shy model. If you're too far you may not get a sense of rapport. I'm thinking 50ish...

Comment #2

The accepted focal lenghts for studio (portrait) work is 85 - 100; hence why you see so many lenses at that focal length that are primes. The reason is the affect various focal lengths have on the nose, short focal lengths and the nose is longer, longer telephoto lengths and you have a flatter nose, a pug nose...

Comment #3

Rsn48 wrote:.

The accepted focal lenghts for studio (portrait) work is 85 - 100;hence why you see so many lenses at that focal length that areprimes. The reason is the affect various focal lengths have on thenose, short focal lengths and the nose is longer, longer telephotolengths and you have a flatter nose, a pug nose..

The accepted lengths are 85, 100, and 135on film or full-frame digital. On a 1.5 or 1.6x body, those correspond to the 50-85 range. For a smaller studio, get the 50 and/or a zoom, like a 28-70 or so...

Comment #4

I was just re-reading some of my Pop Photo's from 2004 when I purchased my Digital Rebel with a crop factor of 1.6. In those days, just about everyone, including our dearly departed Herb Kepler were confusing crop factor - or "field of view" - with magnification. So we all assumed that a 1.6 crop factor was a magnification factor because that is what we were being told by the "experts.".

Recently Herb Kepler realized his mistaken a wrote a new editorial on the crop versus magnification beliefs. He realized that a crop factor is not a magnification factor, a 50mm lens is still a 50mm lens in a 1.5 or 1.6 factored camera..

I was going to write a long and boring explanation, instead it is faster for me to post this link for those beginners to get a grip on this issue, then they instead of me can correct others and they can share in the flames:.

Http://www.luminous-landscape.com/...ials/understanding-series/dslr-mag.shtml.

So you still are better off with an 85mm lens for portraiture, not a 50mm lens on a Canon 1.6 crop giving you a field of view of an 80 lens, but not a magnification that an 85 lens provides..

As I explained else where - seniors moment can't remember where - the reason for 85 mm popularity is the effect this length has on the nose, short focal length = longer nose; much longer focal length = much flatter nose...

Comment #5

Because if you use 50 mm on FF with face close to filling the frame you'll get a wee bit of unnatural-looking perspective distortion:.

Http://lordofthelens.co.nz/JAlbum/Portrait/slides/LIDSKI_PORTRAIT%20(9).html.

Do you understand what I'm saying or should I explain in more detail?.

Http://lordofthelens.co.nz/..

Comment #6

If your short on money, get a 24-85 and shoot it at F8. I've used this lens very succesfully at many events and it works great if you stop it down. I also have avery sharp copy luckily. It's not my first chioce, but if money is tight, it's a bargin..

If you have the bucks get a 24-70L, or 70-200L F4 or F2.8 (IS is nice, but the non-IS version are excellent also).

My 70-200L 2.8 is my normal portrait lens outdoors on location..

In a small studio I like the 24-70L and the 105 Macro Sigma. The Sigma lens is truly a beautiful lens at a bargin price..

Jim Bianchihttp://www.thephotoop.comDigital guru in the making...

Comment #7

Magnification on the sensor, or magnification on a print? A 50mm lens does indeed create the same magnification on the sensor regardless of sensor size. However, that image must be enlarged more from a smaller sensor to make the same size print. This is part of the reason that full-frame cameras offer better image quality..

For the purposes of composition, a 50mm lens on a Canon crop-sensor camera produces the same image as an 80mm one does on full-frame or digital. From a practical standpoint, also note that the OP's studio is going to be too small to use an 85mm lens on a crop-sensor camera except for head-and-shoulders..

'Sorry, I'm right. You're misinterpreting the LL article...

Comment #8

Rsn48 wrote:.

As I explained else where - seniors moment can't remember where - thereason for 85 mm popularity is the effect this length has on thenose, short focal length = longer nose; much longer focal length =much flatter nose..

To continue the point you are making here, the changes in the relative proportion of the nose is a simple perspective effect. The perspective is affected by just one thing, the observer (or camera) viewpoint..

It follows that to shoot the portrait , you position the camera at a suitable distance from the subject for the desired perspective (size of nose etc.) and then choose whichever lens allows the subject to fill the frame in the viewfinder..

For a 35mm film camera, you might choose the 85mm, on 6x6 cm rollfilm perhaps 150mm, and on a crop-sensor DSLR a lens around 50mm would be suitable.Hope this throws some light on the issue,Peter..

Comment #9

Thanks to all of you that replied. I am working with the Nikon D80. I have a couple of the cheaper lenses that came with the bundle; Tamron AF 28-80 3.5-5.6 and the Tamron AF 70-300 4-5.6 Tele-Macro. Tomorrow I will be picking up my first prime lens, a Nikkor AF 50mm 1.8D. My next lens will definately be the 85. I'll tell you one thing for sure...I am HOOKED on this photography thing and I have a lifetime to build up my collection of lenses (and camera bodies). This is only the beginning.QuinNikonD80..

Comment #10

.. Good ones last a lifetime. But unless you plan on becoming a collector, chances are you want to opt to trade, sell bodies once they no longer help you create the images you like..

'Nice pen, bet you write good stories with it.'..

Comment #11

Nonsense and double talk, unless you want to stand outside the room and shoot through the open door..

BAK..

Comment #12

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