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100 % Crop...
Hi all,.

I hear this talked about when people are showing their photo's. I have a feeling it has something to do with Post Processing, just not sure EXACTLY what this means..

Please explain..

As always, thank you all in advance,.

Steve..

Comments (25)

SoCalStev1 wrote:.

Hi all,.

I hear this talked about when people are showing their photo's. Ihave a feeling it has something to do with Post Processing, just notsure EXACTLY what this means..

It's one of the most confusing terms we have. The concept is simple...the "100% Crop" description is dumb...like if you have 100% of the image, how could you have cropped it? Then we note that all 100% crops are NOT the same size!.

I'm not sure what a better name would be? Hmmm....

OK...a 100% crop is simply a crop w/o any pixel interpolation...every original pixel becomes a pixel in the 100% crop image. Yes...this is done with a photo editor..

To show how dumb and meaningless the entire "100% crop" idea is, take a full-size image, say 3888 x 2592, and reduce the size down to 3885 x 2590. It will be indistinguishable from the original. So what did the "100% crop" accomplish?.

Many people who use the term think is has some significance....

Charlie DavisNikon 5700 & Sony R1HomePage: http://www.1derful.infoBridge Blog: http://www.here-ugo.com/BridgeBlog/..

Comment #1

Here are two crops. They both are about 1.9% linear of the original...or 0.017% of the area. One is a 100% crop and the other one isn't:.

Image control:Zoom outZoom 100%Zoom inExpand AllOpen in new window.

They look the same. So what does "100% crop" do for us?.

Charlie DavisNikon 5700 & Sony R1HomePage: http://www.1derful.infoBridge Blog: http://www.here-ugo.com/BridgeBlog/..

Comment #2

SoCalStev1 wrote:.

I hear this talked about when people are showing their photo's. Ihave a feeling it has something to do with Post Processing, just notsure EXACTLY what this means..

Please explain..

A 100% is just an non-resized section (crop) of your photo. It is used to show the image quality of the entire picture without the need to post the full sized photo..

Here is an example of a photo resized for the web (originally 8MP, resampled to 1024x683).

Image control:Zoom outZoom 100%Zoom inExpand AllOpen in new window.

Here is a 100% crop of the same photo (a 553x342 section).

Image control:Zoom outZoom 100%Zoom inExpand AllOpen in new window..

Comment #3

I'm not sure chuxter has got it right, I'll have a go myself..

Yes, the term is badly expressed/defined. It helps to forget about "100% crop" as a term and just talk about what it is supposed to mean..

So - take an image and view it at 100% on your monitor. By whatever means your viewing or editing software provides..

This means you are looking at the picture with a 1:1 correspondence between the pixels in the image, and the pixels on your monitor..

It also means the picture will be very large - unless you've got a really rubbish 0.5 megapixel camera or something .

The alternative, and what people often refer to as a "100% crop", is to crop out a section from the image to a defined number of pixels, without any interpolation, upsizing, downsizing or whatever. You just extract, say, an 800x600 section from the image. And then view it on your monitor at 100%..

These two things are effectively the same, of course - it's just a different way of achieveing the same result. The latter (crop) method is commonly used on the internet because it keeps the image size down..

The key thing is, there's no interpolation or resizing involved - it's all original pixels..

So why do people do it? It's part of the culture of pixel peeping - the idea that you can only properly assess the quality of an image, or the equipment that produced it, with a 100% view..

Despite the fact that this is a view that is never used in real life..

Looking at a 100% "crop" is like sticking your nose up against a 16x20 inch print that has been printed at about 96 dpi (which is a typical monitor resolution)..

100% crop (or view) can be useful / interesting while you're editing. it will also show up flaws in the image that are not visible in any realistic view. it is (IMHO) not a realistic way of assessing image quality or equipment quality - unless you're doing laboratory tests..

Image control:Zoom outZoom 100%Zoom inExpand AllOpen in new window..

Comment #4

I still think I'm correct...that "100% crop" means, as you stated:.

"The key thing is, there's no interpolation or resizing involved - it's all original pixels.".

However, there is no requirement to first view a picture at 100% on your screen. Doing so does not change the subsequent "100% crop" file in any way. It is also difficult to get viewers of the "100% crop" file to do this at 100% on their monitor..

I think you understand that, as you stated:.

"These two things are effectively the same, of course - it's just a.

Different way of achieveing the same result. The latter (crop)method is commonly used on the internet because it keeps the imagesize down..

My point is and was that there is nothing special about a "100% crop" file, other than it is just a small part of the original picture, w/o any changes. It is not magically displayed at 100% on each viewers screen, as many believe..

A proper name might be "a small crop of the original, intended to be viewed at 100% so that you can look at pixels, instead of the picture"?.

We should tell people how to view these little crops at 100%. For example, in PSE5, I click on the "Actual Pixels" button....

Is there a way to view a "100% crop" image in a dpr post at 100% (w/o copying it and pasting it into a viewer/editor)?.

Arrowman wrote:.

I'm not sure chuxter has got it right, I'll have a go myself..

Yes, the term is badly expressed/defined. It helps to forget about"100% crop" as a term and just talk about what it is supposed to mean..

So - take an image and view it at 100% on your monitor. By whatevermeans your viewing or editing software provides..

This means you are looking at the picture with a 1:1 correspondencebetween the pixels in the image, and the pixels on your monitor..

It also means the picture will be very large - unless you've got areally rubbish 0.5 megapixel camera or something .

The alternative, and what people often refer to as a "100% crop", isto crop out a section from the image to a defined number of pixels,without any interpolation, upsizing, downsizing or whatever. Youjust extract, say, an 800x600 section from the image. And then viewit on your monitor at 100%..

These two things are effectively the same, of course - it's just adifferent way of achieveing the same result. The latter (crop)method is commonly used on the internet because it keeps the imagesize down..

The key thing is, there's no interpolation or resizing involved -it's all original pixels..

So why do people do it? It's part of the culture of pixel peeping -the idea that you can only properly assess the quality of an image,or the equipment that produced it, with a 100% view..

Despite the fact that this is a view that is never used in real life..

Looking at a 100% "crop" is like sticking your nose up against a16x20 inch print that has been printed at about 96 dpi (which is atypical monitor resolution)..

100% crop (or view) can be useful / interesting while you're editing.it will also show up flaws in the image that are not visible in anyrealistic view. it is (IMHO) not a realistic way of assessing imagequality or equipment quality - unless you're doing laboratory tests..

Image control:Zoom outZoom 100%Zoom inExpand AllOpen in new window.

Charlie DavisNikon 5700 & Sony R1HomePage: http://www.1derful.infoBridge Blog: http://www.here-ugo.com/BridgeBlog/..

Comment #5

Chuxter wrote:.

My point is and was that there is nothing special about a "100% crop"file, other than it is just a small part of the original picture, w/oany changes..

Which is the whole point... the term "100% crop" is applied mostly to web-sized images, which are drastically smaller than the originals, to distinguish those that were cropped from those that were resized..

It is not magically displayed at 100% on each viewers screen, as many believe..

The default in a web browser is to display images at 100% unless otherwise specified..

Is viewing at 100% unrealistic? Maybe... but then a resized image is somewhat unrealistic too, because a print of that size would have much higher resolution..

The biggest problem is when images compared at 100% have different numbers of megapixels. That's like printing one photo at 8x10 and another at 11x14, and then comparing them under a loupe to decide which camera has better image quality!.

Alan Martin..

Comment #6

Chuxter wrote:.

"The key thing is, there's no interpolation or resizing involved -it's all original pixels.".

I don't see this as being true, you could for example, be showing a 100% crop before and after some post processing. The only requisite for a 100% crop is that it is a crop of the image displayed (or posted, attached, etc) with each pixel on the screen representing a pixel from the image..

Whether it is resampled or resized is generally expressed in a modification of the statement, as in: "a 100% crop of the original", "100% crops before and after sharpening", etc..

My point is and was that there is nothing special about a "100% crop"file, other than it is just a small part of the original picture, w/oany changes. It is not magically displayed at 100% on each viewersscreen, as many believe..

Certainly not magically, but most, if not all browsers will display at two default settings: 100%, or if that is too large to fit in the pane, then at a reduced is so that it will fit in the pane..

We should tell people how to view these little crops at 100%. Forexample, in PSE5, I click on the "Actual Pixels" button....

Yes, and "actual pixels" would be a better name for it. The term 100% crop seems to have drifted into photography from graphic design..

Is there a way to view a "100% crop" image in a dpr post at 100% (w/ocopying it and pasting it into a viewer/editor)?.

It does this automatically in my browser when I click on the image..

Brian A...

Comment #7

Hugowolf wrote:.

Whether it is resampled or resized is generally expressed in amodification of the statement, as in: "a 100% crop of the original","100% crops before and after sharpening", etc..

While it would be reasonable to do some post-processing, for example noise reduction, or sharpening, I would consider the term "100%" expressly disallows either resizing or resampling..

Regards,Peter..

Comment #8

Sherwoodpete wrote:.

Hugowolf wrote:.

Whether it is resampled or resized is generally expressed in amodification of the statement, as in: "a 100% crop of the original","100% crops before and after sharpening", etc..

While it would be reasonable to do some post-processing, for examplenoise reduction, or sharpening, I would consider the term "100%"expressly disallows either resizing or resampling..

Perhaps after the crop, but not before. Consider a discussion of the effects of compression on image quality, as in: "here is a 100% crop of the image before compression and here is 100% crop after compression"..

Clearly the 100% refers to something other than the cropping. A 40% crop could either be 40% of the image removed or 40% remaining, but 100% makes no sense in this use. So 100% could imply a lack of resizing and resampling, but it is still a very awkward term, not that photographical discussion isn't full of other such misleading terms..

Brian A...

Comment #9

The full-size file is very large on the monitor. So, those crops are made for easy uploading, viewing, testing and side-by-side comparisons. If you open your picture file in a viewing program, like ACDSee, for example, you can set it to 100% magnification - or what you call VIEW - ACTUAL PIXELS in the Photoshop. Then you'd only see a wee part of the whole image on your monitor. If you crop a certain detail out of that magnification to, say, compare resolution between 2 lenses or cameras, that will be a 100% crop. You could also print it as a standart size photo, which would show you how a poster-size photo from the same original file would look in terms of image quality..

Http://lordofthelens.smugmug.com/..

Comment #10

The term 100% crop is digital photographer's slang which I had never seen until I started reading dpreview - and that's from someone who has been in the graphic design business since 1990. It's a nonsensical term, but one quick glance at Photoshop shows where it comes from, since the same wrong-thinking term is used (the 100% bit, that is - I'm not arguing with 'crop'!)..

'1:1 crop' is much better - if everyone who reads this starts using it, maybe we can supplant the other less accurate term ..

Comment #11

Let's use as our example a 6megapixel camera with an image made up of 3000 pixels from east to west, and 2000 pixels from north to south..

And, to make the math easier, lets look at this picture on a monitor that is 1000 pixels wide..

Software in the computer usually automatically reduces the 3000 x 2000 pixels in the photo so that they fit on the 1000 pixel-wide screen..

Depending on your software, you may see some number somewhere on the screen..

In Photoshop Elements for instance, there may be 12.5 per cent or 50% or 66.7% in the title of the image at the top of the picture in the Elements editing window..

And down in the lower left corner, you may see some indication of size, such as 30 x 45 inches..

OBviously your screen is not that big, so if the whole picture is on the screen, something is being electronically altered..

IbOn Windows machines, pressing CTRL and + makes the center of your picture get bigger and bigger, with each push. Going the other way, ctrl and - makes your shot smaller..

At some point, what you'll get on your screen is part of the picture, blown up big, so that it's the same size as the picture dimensions down in the corner of your screen..

So if the dimensionas are 30 x 45 inches, and you had a 30 x 45 inch print, the image on the screen would be the same size as the center of the picture. Say you had a car in the shot, and it was 8 inches long on your screen after pressingctrl + a few times, and it was also 8 inches on the real print you're holding right behind the monitor..

That's 100 percent. The crop part is when you use the cropping tool on your software to chop out a convenient sized picece of this image. You might chop off the front wheel, front fendr, and hood, which takes up 5 inches of the paper print and five inches of the on-screen image..

This 5 inch wide image is small enough to send as an e-mail, post on DPR, etc. And by being 100%, you get a fairly decent idea of how sharp the image is without the pixels being squished to fit on the screen (where the tiotle bar says 50% or 33%, or stretched, at, say 200%..

BAK..

Comment #12

Unfortunately, BAK, your reply doesn't deliver what was promised in the subject line..

The term "100% crop" and the 'zoom' percentages given in Photoshop have *absolutely nothing whatsoever* to do with inches. It refers *only* to the pixel size and takes no account of print size, resolution or anything else...

Comment #13

BAK wrote:.

Let's use as our example a 6megapixel camera with an image made up of3000 pixels from east to west, and 2000 pixels from north to south..

And, to make the math easier, lets look at this picture on a monitorthat is 1000 pixels wide..

Software in the computer usually automatically reduces the 3000 x2000 pixels in the photo so that they fit on the 1000 pixel-widescreen..

Depending on your software, you may see some number somewhere on thescreen..

In Photoshop Elements for instance, there may be 12.5 per cent or 50%or 66.7% in the title of the image at the top of the picture in theElements editing window..

And down in the lower left corner, you may see some indication ofsize, such as 30 x 45 inches..

OBviously your screen is not that big, so if the whole picture is onthe screen, something is being electronically altered..

IbOn Windows machines, pressing CTRL and + makes the center of yourpicture get bigger and bigger, with each push. Going the other way,ctrl and - makes your shot smaller..

At some point, what you'll get on your screen is part of the picture,blown up big, so that it's the same size as the picture dimensionsdown in the corner of your screen..

So if the dimensionas are 30 x 45 inches, and you had a 30 x 45 inchprint, the image on the screen would be the same size as the centerof the picture. Say you had a car in the shot, and it was 8 incheslong on your screen after pressingctrl + a few times, and it was also8 inches on the real print you're holding right behind the monitor..

That's 100 percent. The crop part is when you use the cropping toolon your software to chop out a convenient sized picece of this image.You might chop off the front wheel, front fendr, and hood, whichtakes up 5 inches of the paper print and five inches of the on-screenimage..

This 5 inch wide image is small enough to send as an e-mail, post onDPR, etc. And by being 100%, you get a fairly decent idea of howsharp the image is without the pixels being squished to fit on thescreen (where the tiotle bar says 50% or 33%, or stretched, at, say200%..

BAK.

Using your example image dimensions of 3000 x 2000 pixels that corresponds to 66.7 pixels per inch (PPI)..

So you are saying the image is viewed at 100% size when the image dimensions in inches agrees with the image size based on the 66.7 PPI figure. What happens if the PPI setting is changed to 300 PPI? The image size in inches would change from the example 45 x 30 inches to 10 x 6.7 inches. So you'd have to zoom in or out depending on the PPI setting..

I'm not aware of 100% crop being used in this way. I'd always understood it to mean something very specific and not dependent on a purely arbitrary PPI setting. That is to say, it relates specifically to "Actual Pixels".Regards,Peter..

Comment #14

Alan Martin wrote:.

Chuxter wrote:.

My point is and was that there is nothing special about a "100% crop"file, other than it is just a small part of the original picture, w/oany changes..

Which is the whole point... the term "100% crop" is applied mostly toweb-sized images, which are drastically smaller than the originals,to distinguish those that were cropped from those that were resized..

It is not magically displayed at 100% on each viewers screen, as many believe..

The default in a web browser is to display images at 100% unlessotherwise specified..

Yes, that's true and a good point. I was thinking of other software. Duh!.

Is viewing at 100% unrealistic? Maybe... but then a resized image issomewhat unrealistic too, because a print of that size would havemuch higher resolution..

The biggest problem is when images compared at 100% have differentnumbers of megapixels. That's like printing one photo at 8x10 andanother at 11x14, and then comparing them under a loupe to decidewhich camera has better image quality!.

Alan Martin.

Charlie DavisNikon 5700 & Sony R1HomePage: http://www.1derful.infoBridge Blog: http://www.here-ugo.com/BridgeBlog/..

Comment #15

Hugowolf wrote:.

Chuxter wrote:.

"The key thing is, there's no interpolation or resizing involved -it's all original pixels.".

I don't see this as being true, you could for example, be showing a100% crop before and after some post processing. The only requisitefor a 100% crop is that it is a crop of the image displayed (orposted, attached, etc) with each pixel on the screen representing apixel from the image..

Whether it is resampled or resized is generally expressed in amodification of the statement, as in: "a 100% crop of the original","100% crops before and after sharpening", etc..

My point is and was that there is nothing special about a "100% crop"file, other than it is just a small part of the original picture, w/oany changes. It is not magically displayed at 100% on each viewersscreen, as many believe..

Certainly not magically, but most, if not all browsers will displayat two default settings: 100%, or if that is too large to fit in thepane, then at a reduced is so that it will fit in the pane..

We should tell people how to view these little crops at 100%. Forexample, in PSE5, I click on the "Actual Pixels" button....

Yes, and "actual pixels" would be a better name for it. The term 100%crop seems to have drifted into photography from graphic design..

Is there a way to view a "100% crop" image in a dpr post at 100% (w/ocopying it and pasting it into a viewer/editor)?.

It does this automatically in my browser when I click on the image..

Yes, Alan pointed out my error. Thanks....

Charlie DavisNikon 5700 & Sony R1HomePage: http://www.1derful.infoBridge Blog: http://www.here-ugo.com/BridgeBlog/..

Comment #16

Put together from one of our Oly Forum members...

Http://www.pbase.com/otfchallenge/100_crop.

I hope you'll find it helpful..

LucyE- 510 w/2 lens kit!U ZI owner!Olympus C30-20Zhttp://www.pbase.com/lucyFCAS Member #98, Oly Division'Photography is the art of seeing what others do not.'.

Image control:Zoom outZoom 100%Zoom inExpand AllOpen in new window..

Comment #17

Well no, excpet if you've invented your own dictionary of incorrect terms..

No point in misleading the poor guy..

BAK..

Comment #18

RE>Using your example image dimensions of 3000 x 2000 pixels that corresponds to 66.7 pixels per inch (PPI).<.

Where?.

3000 pixels is only 67 ppi when theres a 40 inch, or so, image..

3000 pixels is ten inches at 300 ppi.

3000 pixels is 100 inches wide at 30 ppi..

BAK..

Comment #19

BAK wrote:.

RE>Using your example image dimensions of 3000 x 2000 pixels thatcorresponds to 66.7 pixels per inch (PPI)..

Where?.

Here:.

BAK wrote:.

And down in the lower left corner, you may see some indication ofsize, such as 30 x 45 inches...

Comment #20

BAK wrote:.

Well no, excpet if you've invented your own dictionary of incorrectterms..

It is certainly true that '100% crop' is an invented term, and one which was quite possibly invented on this forum or another like it. But invented or not it does have a meaning, and it is not as you explained it..

No point in misleading the poor guy..

I didn't understand that comment...

Comment #21

"A one hundred percent crop" is a confusing phrase, expressed as it normally is..

Forget the "crop" for a moment, and let's see what the 100% means. It's actually quite simple, and it refers to *the display of* an image such that one pixel on the viewing device typically your computer monitor is allocated to one recorded image pixel. When using an image editor or viewer you'll typically find the screen "magnification" (for want of a better term) quoted numerically (in the window title bar, status bar, or elsewhere) as a percentage, and in this case it's when that reads 100%. But the base unit for comparison remains 1 display pixel per 1 image pixel, i.e. Steve Balcombe has it exactly right with his "1:1" reference, which is immediately and completely meaningful, and would make a much better descriptive term for the world to adopt. This "100%" expression is really a secondary, roundabout way of saying the same thing, is indeed jargon bordering on slang, and quite unnecessary..

What use is a 1:1 display? Well if you want to view the whole image at once, the only answer to that is "Home Theatre". A typical 8-megapixel consumer camera's recorded image has pixel dimensions of around 3264 x 2448 (width x height). A just-as-typical (these days) LCD desktop display has native pixel dimensions of 1600 x 1024 pixels, so obviously we can't fit the entire 1:1 image on it at once and we have to scroll around if we want to progressively examine that whole image. Nevertheless, that full 1:1 image is available to us at that setting, and is effectively several feet in width, with our monitor able to display only a portion of it at one time..

This is where the "crop" now comes in. There will be occasional legitimate reasons (forgetting "pixel peeping" in it's more cynical sense) for letting people see that 1:1 image, but it's only a very rare requirement that the *entire* image be available at that screen "magnification". So, for purposes of close examination and subsequent discussion, it's usual to take (crop) one or more meaningful, representative chunks from that full image and post them on their own, omitting material that's extraneous to the discussion..

In the end, all we've done is translate that rather strange "100% crop" expression to read "representative crop from a 1:1 image". Takes a bit longer to roll off the tongue in this form, but at least it makes a degree of sense. CAUTION: as others have rightly pointed out it still, and always, remains incumbent upon the viewer to arrange that their system (including monitor and browser (or other software) settings) does actually display a given image at 1:1 (or "100%") when it's the poster's intention that it be viewed that way. The first and obvious possibility for deviation from this is the "Image control" bar provided, in these columns, above every embedded image..

SoCalStev1 wrote:.

Hi all,.

I hear this talked about when people are showing their photo's. Ihave a feeling it has something to do with Post Processing, just notsure EXACTLY what this means..

Not Post-Processing per se. Just viewing..

MikeMelbourne.

Image control:Zoom outZoom 100%Zoom inExpand AllOpen in new window..

Comment #22

Let me take a stab at this from a different angle....

Imagine a printed photograph, say an 8x10. Now, take your scissors and cut out a 1x1 inch square from one of the corners. Or right from the middle, doesn't matter..

You now have a 100% crop..

The pixels, resolution, DPI, whatever in the resulting 1x1 inch piece has not changed. It's taken, unaltered, from the original..

Now, imagine the same thing using your computer. Take your cropping tool in Photoshop or whatever, set it to do NO "resize" crops, and chop out a little piece of the photo..

This little piece is a "100% crop". The 100% just means that you've not performed any resizing on the post-crop result..

This is generally useful if you want to show others a technical problem with an image. Posting the ENTIRE image is problematic due to size, and resizing the image to make it smaller may obscure whatever it was you wanted to show to others. The answer is to make a "100% crop" of the area in questions.

I agree with the others, though. It's a bad term. I like 1:1 crop. Or native resolution crop..

Dpreview & pbase supporterhttp://www.pbase.com/digirob..

Comment #23

Mike Fitzgerald wrote:.

... A typical8-megapixel consumer camera's recorded image has pixel dimensions ofaround 3264 x 2448 (width x height). A just-as-typical (these days)LCD desktop display has native pixel dimensions of 1600 x 1024pixels, so obviously we can't fit the entire 1:1 image on it at once.

More likely screen dimensions would be 1600 x 1200 or 1280 x 1024 pixels, but you get the idea... a 1:1 (100%) display of that 8-mP image would, on any such monitor, be largely virtual, extending well beyond the physical boundaries of the actual screen and requiring a great deal of scrolling in order to view progressively..

MikeMelbourne.

Image control:Zoom outZoom 100%Zoom inExpand AllOpen in new window..

Comment #24

BAK wrote:.

Let's use as our example a 6megapixel camera with an image made up of3000 pixels from east to west, and 2000 pixels from north to south..

And, to make the math easier, lets look at this picture on a monitorthat is 1000 pixels wide..

Software in the computer usually automatically reduces the 3000 x2000 pixels in the photo so that they fit on the 1000 pixel-widescreen..

Depending on your software, you may see some number somewhere on thescreen..

In Photoshop Elements for instance, there may be 12.5 per cent or 50%or 66.7% in the title of the image at the top of the picture in theElements editing window..

And down in the lower left corner, you may see some indication ofsize, such as 30 x 45 inches..

OBviously your screen is not that big, so if the whole picture is onthe screen, something is being electronically altered..

True, but quoting dimensions like those (30 x 45 inches) is getting dangerously misleading. It is totally dependent on the value of the Resolution tag that happens to have been assigned by the camera manufacturer or else (in the absence of that) by Photoshop. And for the purpose of this discussion or, in fact, of anything other than printing (and rather specialised printing requirements at that) it is utterly meaningless..

The last thing we want to be doing is pulling resolution into this dialogue. We're already in the second-largest can of worms that exists in the understanding of digital image display. Let's not make things even worse by jumping into the biggest of the lot! .

So if the dimensionas are 30 x 45 inches, and you had a 30 x 45 inchprint, the image on the screen would be the same size as the centerof the picture. Say you had a car in the shot, and it was 8 incheslong on your screen after pressingctrl + a few times, and it was also8 inches on the real print you're holding right behind the monitor..

The software doesn't know (or need to know) the physical dimensions of the display device. It observes the Resolution tag by assigning real-world dimensions to the image (unnecessary for our discussion), and lets it go at that. Those dimensions that you're quoting sound typical for a Res. of 72 ppi but, wherever they've come from, "belong" to the image file not to the monitor, and the first thing to notice is that they don't change when you change the screen zoom..

Secondly, let's say your example of that 8-inch wide rendering of the car happens to hold true for a given monitor let's say it's a 17" diagonal, 1280 x 1024 pixel LCD. So far so good. But now let's take the same image file and display it, likewise at "100%", on the screen of a physically smaller sub-notebook computer that also has native resolution of 1280 x 1024. Nothing changes, pixel wise, but the whole real-world image size (in inches) will be correspondingly smaller, as will that 8-inch car contained in it..

At which point the notion of inch-for-inch, 1:1 equality falls completely in a heap..

It's been said a thousand times, but obviously needs reiterating once more: Real-world (inch, centimetre, etc.) dimensions have NO PLACE OR MEANING in the understanding of digital image display issues..

That's 100 percent..

Nope. 100 percent is simply the allocation of monitor resources such that one display pixel = one image pixel, with no scaling applied..

MikeMelbourne.

Image control:Zoom outZoom 100%Zoom inExpand AllOpen in new window..

Comment #25

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This question was taken from a support group/message board and re-posted here so others can learn from it.

 

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